Pros

  • Exudes character and charm.
  • Old school muscle car vibes with very few of the drawbacks.
  • Wide range of examples available on the used market.
  • Showing very good reliability.

Cons

  • The fit and finish does not match the asking price.
  • Safety rating concerns.
  • Not the most practical performance car out there.
  • V8 fuel consumption when you flex that right foot.

Verdict

We’re going to take a wild guess here, if you’re seriously considering buying a Mustang, no matter what this Cheat Sheet says about it, you’re probably just going to buy one regardless, aren’t you? Thought so.

Obviously, there’s no valid reason you should ever buy a Mustang, the build quality...

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What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

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Publish: February 10, 2023

The Ford Mustang has been around since 1964, spanning 6 generations but this cheat sheet is focussing on the 2015 to 2023 S550

Available as a rear-wheel drive, 2-door coupe or convertible, here in Australia packing either a 5.0-litre V8 (with the majority of these being naturally aspirated, however a couple of variants have been assisted by supercharges) or a turbocharged 2.3-litre 4 cylinder engine.

Many of you will may your noses up at the 4-cylinder Mustang but that engine is ostensibly the same as found in the hottest of Ford’s hot hatches. So to make the 4-cylinder Mustang far more appealing, just think of it as a rear-wheel drive Focus RS, only it’s ditched the hatchback body and replaced it with some retro-inspired 2-door coolness.

The vast majority of Mustangs on the used market will be badged either the V8-powered GT or simply the Mustang (packing that 4-cylinder engine), but there have been a smattering of special editions here locally like the Steve McQueen-inspired and tastefully enhanced ‘Bullitt’, followed by the 4-cylinder ‘High Performance’, the fire breathing supercharged ‘R-Spec’ and finally the honed and improved ‘Mach 1’, all the specific details are below.

However, this doesn’t include the plethora of special editions that have been available internationally, some of which are available here via private or grey imports here in Australia, for example, the Shelby GT350 and 500 but, you’ll be paying quite the premium to get your hands on one of these. Think in the order of north

The Ford Mustang has been around since 1964, spanning 6 generations but this cheat sheet is focussing on the 2015 to 2023 S550

Available as a rear-wheel drive, 2-door coupe or convertible, here in Australia packing either a 5.0-litre V8 (with the majority of these being naturally aspirated, however a couple of variants have been assisted by supercharges) or a turbocharged 2.3-litre 4 cylinder engine.

Many of you will may your noses up at the 4-cylinder Mustang but that engine is ostensibly the same as found in the hottest of Ford’s hot hatches. So to make the 4-cylinder Mustang far more appealing, just think of it as a rear-wheel drive Focus RS, only it’s ditched the hatchback body and replaced it with some retro-inspired 2-door coolness.

The vast majority of Mustangs on the used market will be badged either the V8-powered GT or simply the Mustang (packing that 4-cylinder engine), but there have been a smattering of special editions here locally like the Steve McQueen-inspired and tastefully enhanced ‘Bullitt’, followed by the 4-cylinder ‘High Performance’, the fire breathing supercharged ‘R-Spec’ and finally the honed and improved ‘Mach 1’, all the specific details are below.

However, this doesn’t include the plethora of special editions that have been available internationally, some of which are available here via private or grey imports here in Australia, for example, the Shelby GT350 and 500 but, you’ll be paying quite the premium to get your hands on one of these. Think in the order of north of $200,000.

The Mustang also received a mid-cycle update available from 2018 that featured more power thanks to a host of mechanical improvements, extra options when it comes to the chassis, improved tech and features, and some new exterior and interior trim.

The easiest way to spot a pre or post-update Mustang is the headlight design, pre-update the headlights sweep up, looking all tough and angry, post update they swoop down, and look a bit sad, poor thing.

The Ford Mustang has been around since 1964, spanning 6 generations but this cheat sheet is focussing on the 2015 to 2023 S550

Available as a rear-wheel drive, 2-door coupe or convertible, here in Australia packing either a 5.0-litre V8 (with the majority of these being naturally aspirated, however a couple of variants have been assisted by supercharges) or a turbocharged 2.3-litre 4 cylinder engine.

Many of you will may your noses up at the 4-cylinder Mustang but that engine is ostensibly the same as found in the hottest of Ford’s hot hatches. So to make the 4-cylinder Mustang far more appealing, just think of it as a rear-wheel drive Focus RS, only it’s ditched the hatchback body and replaced it with some retro-inspired 2-door coolness.

The vast majority of Mustangs on the used market will be badged either the V8-powered GT or simply the Mustang (packing that 4-cylinder engine), but there have been a smattering of special editions here locally like the Steve McQueen-inspired and tastefully enhanced ‘Bullitt’, followed by the 4-cylinder ‘High Performance’, the fire breathing supercharged ‘R-Spec’ and finally the honed and improved ‘Mach 1’, all the specific details are below.

However, this doesn’t include the plethora of special editions that have been available internationally, some of which are available here via private or grey imports here in Australia, for example, the Shelby GT350 and 500 but, you’ll be paying quite the premium to get your hands on one of these. Think in the order of north of $200,000.

The Mustang also received a mid-cycle update available from 2018 that featured more power thanks to a host of mechanical improvements, extra options when it comes to the chassis, improved tech and features, and some new exterior and interior trim.

The easiest way to spot a pre or post-update Mustang is the headlight design, pre-update the headlights sweep up, looking all tough and angry, post update they swoop down, and look a bit sad, poor thing.

Exterior:

The most common complaint from owners is underwhelming build quality.

Misaligned or poorly fitting body panels, paint colours not matching across panels and doors dropping in alignment have been reported.

With the doors being so long, be sure to check for missing paint on the outer edge of the door and that the doors haven’t been scraping up against anything solid too often too.

Also, there have been reports of water leaking through the rear window due to poorly sealed holes.

Also, with plenty of Mustangs being modified, be on the lookout for cheap dodgy body kits and accessories and poorly repaired accident damage.

Inside:

Some owners have had dramas with the Sync 2 infotainment systems, complaining of glitchy or slow operations. Sometimes just a software or firmware update will sort it out.

However, if the radio or infotainment system is on the fritz, check to see if the rear window-mounted brake light and reverse camera are working as the issue might actually be related to a wiring harness issue.

Although, that rear camera failing might just be a loose connector.

There are plenty of reports that the older the Mustangs get, the more rattles and squeaks and alarming noises occur.

Also thanks to some of the dodgy panel gaps, water can get into the doors but it can then create issues with the electronics for the window and door locks so just make sure the windows go up and down and the locks don’t have a mind of their own.

Also, check if the windows slightly lowering and lifting when the door is opened and closed, doesn’t occur randomly when driving.

On 2015 to 2017 Mustangs, check that the sat nav and speedo actually work, there have been reports these can fail on earlier models.

Then there are complaints of issues with the air conditioning, compressors and evaporators have quite the reputation and fixing them can quickly add up financially. If you’re in the market, make sure the air-con works on every setting.

Aside from that for the interior, there are plenty of reports of sporadic electronic issues and again, just poor overall build quality.

Mechanically:

Focussing on the 2.3-litre 4-cylinder Ecoboost first. It features direct fuel injection and is ostensibly the same engine as in the hot hatch Focus RS.

The Focus did have some head gasket issues early on, which were typically covered by warranty, although in the Mustang, in standard engines (without performance modifications) the head gaskets are not a common problem.

However, when modified with more boost and therefore more load, the head gasket can become a problem.

High mileage examples do suffer from clogged-up inlets (thanks to no port injection) but other than

Exterior:

The most common complaint from owners is underwhelming build quality.

Misaligned or poorly fitting body panels, paint colours not matching across panels and doors dropping in alignment have been reported.

With the doors being so long, be sure to check for missing paint on the outer edge of the door and that the doors haven’t been scraping up against anything solid too often too.

Also, there have been reports of water leaking through the rear window due to poorly sealed holes.

Also, with plenty of Mustangs being modified, be on the lookout for cheap dodgy body kits and accessories and poorly repaired accident damage.

Inside:

Some owners have had dramas with the Sync 2 infotainment systems, complaining of glitchy or slow operations. Sometimes just a software or firmware update will sort it out.

However, if the radio or infotainment system is on the fritz, check to see if the rear window-mounted brake light and reverse camera are working as the issue might actually be related to a wiring harness issue.

Although, that rear camera failing might just be a loose connector.

There are plenty of reports that the older the Mustangs get, the more rattles and squeaks and alarming noises occur.

Also thanks to some of the dodgy panel gaps, water can get into the doors but it can then create issues with the electronics for the window and door locks so just make sure the windows go up and down and the locks don’t have a mind of their own.

Also, check if the windows slightly lowering and lifting when the door is opened and closed, doesn’t occur randomly when driving.

On 2015 to 2017 Mustangs, check that the sat nav and speedo actually work, there have been reports these can fail on earlier models.

Then there are complaints of issues with the air conditioning, compressors and evaporators have quite the reputation and fixing them can quickly add up financially. If you’re in the market, make sure the air-con works on every setting.

Aside from that for the interior, there are plenty of reports of sporadic electronic issues and again, just poor overall build quality.

Mechanically:

Focussing on the 2.3-litre 4-cylinder Ecoboost first. It features direct fuel injection and is ostensibly the same engine as in the hot hatch Focus RS.

The Focus did have some head gasket issues early on, which were typically covered by warranty, although in the Mustang, in standard engines (without performance modifications) the head gaskets are not a common problem.

However, when modified with more boost and therefore more load, the head gasket can become a problem.

High mileage examples do suffer from clogged-up inlets (thanks to no port injection) but other than that, they are showing pretty good reliability, and if well serviced, there is no one serious issue to worry about.

Now the good ol’V8 Coyote. In the earlier (pre-update) FM generation Mustang, this is a 5-litre normally aspirated V8 with port injection while the later versions in the FN (post-update) had port and direct injection, a slightly larger capacity plus there are less common supercharged versions as well.

All of the Mustang V8 engines are widely considered reliable.

There are cases of piston and bore complications which are more common in the supercharged versions and there are different opinions regarding the cause. From an engine fault mechanically to issues with the tune.

There’s a lot of internet talk about a ticking noise coming from the engine. Again there is a lot of speculation about what causes this ticking and if it’s a problem at all. The post-update engines definitely have a direct injection rattle which is totally normal but there’s information that suggests piston slap may be another cause of the ticking sound. There are also theories that it’s just the oil splashing around inside the sump. Typically though, it’s nothing to worry about, they just tick.

The MT82 manual trans does have a few problems. There are some issues with the selector mechanism, both external selector linkages and internal problems with selector forks failing. And some reports of premature clutch failure too, although that one might be more to do with operator technique.

The 6-speed 6R80 and 10-speed 10R80 autos are in a variety of rear and 4WD Fords and because they’re so common, you don’t have to look too hard to find plenty of mechanical and operational issues.

But statistically, a low percentage of these transmissions actually catastrophically fail. They do have a number of valve body, solenoid and clutch pack issues and the service interval on the transmissions is every 200,000km which is ridiculous. If you want the transmission to last, do it every 50-60,000km. That wont guarantee you wont have any problems but it will certainly help.

Recalls:

  • 27 June 2022 – Manufacturing faults were discovered with the rear-view camera, reverse lamps  and other driver assist features. This will cause warning signals to show on the instrument cluster. This recall affected 2,303 vehicles built between 2018 & 2020.
  • 9 March 2017 – There was an issue with clearance between the battery cable wiring loom and the exhaust manifold. It was possible that battery cable could short circuit causing an engine bay fire. There were no reported occurrences of this happening, but the issue affected 1,391 vehicles made between 2016 & 2016.

Exterior:

The most common complaint from owners is underwhelming build quality.

Misaligned or poorly fitting body panels, paint colours not matching across panels and doors dropping in alignment have been reported.

With the doors being so long, be sure to check for missing paint on the outer edge of the door and that the doors haven’t been scraping up against anything solid too often too.

Also, there have been reports of water leaking through the rear window due to poorly sealed holes.

Also, with plenty of Mustangs being modified, be on the lookout for cheap dodgy body kits and accessories and poorly repaired accident damage.

Inside:

Some owners have had dramas with the Sync 2 infotainment systems, complaining of glitchy or slow operations. Sometimes just a software or firmware update will sort it out.

However, if the radio or infotainment system is on the fritz, check to see if the rear window-mounted brake light and reverse camera are working as the issue might actually be related to a wiring harness issue.

Although, that rear camera failing might just be a loose connector.

There are plenty of reports that the older the Mustangs get, the more rattles and squeaks and alarming noises occur.

Also thanks to some of the dodgy panel gaps, water can get into the doors but it can then create issues with the electronics for the window and door locks so just make sure the windows go up and down and the locks don’t have a mind of their own.

Also, check if the windows slightly lowering and lifting when the door is opened and closed, doesn’t occur randomly when driving.

On 2015 to 2017 Mustangs, check that the sat nav and speedo actually work, there have been reports these can fail on earlier models.

Then there are complaints of issues with the air conditioning, compressors and evaporators have quite the reputation and fixing them can quickly add up financially. If you’re in the market, make sure the air-con works on every setting.

Aside from that for the interior, there are plenty of reports of sporadic electronic issues and again, just poor overall build quality.

Mechanically:

Focussing on the 2.3-litre 4-cylinder Ecoboost first. It features direct fuel injection and is ostensibly the same engine as in the hot hatch Focus RS.

The Focus did have some head gasket issues early on, which were typically covered by warranty, although in the Mustang, in standard engines (without performance modifications) the head gaskets are not a common problem.

However, when modified with more boost and therefore more load, the head gasket can become a problem.

High mileage examples do suffer from clogged-up inlets (thanks to no port injection) but other than that, they are showing pretty good reliability, and if well serviced, there is no one serious issue to worry about.

Now the good ol’V8 Coyote. In the earlier (pre-update) FM generation Mustang, this is a 5-litre normally aspirated V8 with port injection while the later versions in the FN (post-update) had port and direct injection, a slightly larger capacity plus there are less common supercharged versions as well.

All of the Mustang V8 engines are widely considered reliable.

There are cases of piston and bore complications which are more common in the supercharged versions and there are different opinions regarding the cause. From an engine fault mechanically to issues with the tune.

There’s a lot of internet talk about a ticking noise coming from the engine. Again there is a lot of speculation about what causes this ticking and if it’s a problem at all. The post-update engines definitely have a direct injection rattle which is totally normal but there’s information that suggests piston slap may be another cause of the ticking sound. There are also theories that it’s just the oil splashing around inside the sump. Typically though, it’s nothing to worry about, they just tick.

The MT82 manual trans does have a few problems. There are some issues with the selector mechanism, both external selector linkages and internal problems with selector forks failing. And some reports of premature clutch failure too, although that one might be more to do with operator technique.

The 6-speed 6R80 and 10-speed 10R80 autos are in a variety of rear and 4WD Fords and because they’re so common, you don’t have to look too hard to find plenty of mechanical and operational issues.

But statistically, a low percentage of these transmissions actually catastrophically fail. They do have a number of valve body, solenoid and clutch pack issues and the service interval on the transmissions is every 200,000km which is ridiculous. If you want the transmission to last, do it every 50-60,000km. That wont guarantee you wont have any problems but it will certainly help.

Recalls:

  • 27 June 2022 – Manufacturing faults were discovered with the rear-view camera, reverse lamps  and other driver assist features. This will cause warning signals to show on the instrument cluster. This recall affected 2,303 vehicles built between 2018 & 2020.
  • 9 March 2017 – There was an issue with clearance between the battery cable wiring loom and the exhaust manifold. It was possible that battery cable could short circuit causing an engine bay fire. There were no reported occurrences of this happening, but the issue affected 1,391 vehicles made between 2016 & 2016.

Body Style:

2-door coupé (Mustang, High Performance, GT, BULLITT, Mach 1, R-Spec)
2-door convertible (Mustang, High Performance, GT)

Engines:

2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang, High Performance)
5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT, BULLITT, Mach 1)
5.0-litre supercharged V8 petrol (R-Spec)

Power:

233kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang)
224kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang) – from MY18
236kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (High Performance)
303kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT)
339kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT) – MY18
345kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (BULLITT, Mach 1)
552kW – 5.0-litre supercharged V8 petrol (R-Spec)

Torque:

432Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang)
441Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang) – MY18
448Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (High Performance)
525Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT)
556Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT) – MY18
556Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (BULLITT, Mach 1)

Transmission & drivetrains:

6-speed manual, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang coupé, High Performance coupé, GT coupé, BULLITT, Mach 1, R-Spec
6-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang, Mustang convertible, GT coupé, GT convertible
10-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang coupé, Mustang convertible, High Performance coupé, High Performance convertible, GT coupé , GT convertible, Mach 1

Fuel Consumption:

8.5 – 14.0L/100km

Length:

4789mm

Width:

1916mm

Height:

1387mm

Kerb weight:

1716 – 1840kg

Body Style:

2-door coupé (Mustang, High Performance, GT, BULLITT, Mach 1, R-Spec)
2-door convertible (Mustang, High Performance, GT)

Engines:

2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang, High Performance)
5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT, BULLITT, Mach 1)
5.0-litre supercharged V8 petrol (R-Spec)

Power:

233kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang)
224kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang) – from MY18
236kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (High Performance)
303kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT)
339kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT) – MY18
345kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (BULLITT, Mach 1)
552kW – 5.0-litre supercharged V8 petrol (R-Spec)

Torque:

432Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang)
441Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang) – MY18
448Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (High Performance)
525Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT)
556Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT) – MY18
556Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (BULLITT, Mach 1)

Transmission & drivetrains:

6-speed manual, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang coupé, High Performance coupé, GT coupé, BULLITT, Mach 1, R-Spec
6-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang, Mustang convertible, GT coupé, GT convertible
10-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang coupé, Mustang convertible, High Performance coupé, High Performance convertible, GT coupé , GT convertible, Mach 1

Fuel Consumption:

8.5 – 14.0L/100km

Length:

4789mm

Width:

1916mm

Height:

1387mm

Kerb weight:

1716 – 1840kg

Body Style:

2-door coupé (Mustang, High Performance, GT, BULLITT, Mach 1, R-Spec)
2-door convertible (Mustang, High Performance, GT)

Engines:

2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang, High Performance)
5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT, BULLITT, Mach 1)
5.0-litre supercharged V8 petrol (R-Spec)

Power:

233kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang)
224kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang) – from MY18
236kW – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (High Performance)
303kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT)
339kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT) – MY18
345kW – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (BULLITT, Mach 1)
552kW – 5.0-litre supercharged V8 petrol (R-Spec)

Torque:

432Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang)
441Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (Mustang) – MY18
448Nm – 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol (High Performance)
525Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT)
556Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (GT) – MY18
556Nm – 5.0-litre V8 petrol (BULLITT, Mach 1)

Transmission & drivetrains:

6-speed manual, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang coupé, High Performance coupé, GT coupé, BULLITT, Mach 1, R-Spec
6-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang, Mustang convertible, GT coupé, GT convertible
10-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Mustang coupé, Mustang convertible, High Performance coupé, High Performance convertible, GT coupé , GT convertible, Mach 1

Fuel Consumption:

8.5 – 14.0L/100km

Length:

4789mm

Width:

1916mm

Height:

1387mm

Kerb weight:

1716 – 1840kg

Warranty:

3 years/100,000kms
5 years/unlimited kms (from May 2018)

Servicing:

12-months/15,000kms

Model range, pricing & features

Ford Mustang-8

Mustang / Mustang EcoBoost

Price when new: $45,990 - $59,490

Price used: $28,300 - $58,000

The base Mustang model (also referred to as the EcoBoost) was introduced in late 2015 with deliveries following in the second quarter of 2016. It features a 2.3 litre turbocharged 4-cylinder petrol engine, mated to either six-speed manual or optional six-speed automatic; and available in either the 2-door coupé (fastback) or 2-door convertible (auto-only).

The Mustang received several updates through model years 2017, 2018 and 2019 including SYNC 3 infotainment system, AED, lane departure warning, lane keeping assist, adaptive cruise control, digital cockpit, Brembo brakes, 12-speaker B&O play sound system and LED headlights.

The Mustang / Mustang EcoBoost was eventually replaced in November 2017 by the EcoBoost High Performance.

Standard features:

9-inch alloy wheels
4-spot ventilated brakes
Body-coloured bumper bars
Body-coloured side mirrors
Front spoiler
Rear diffuser
Sports body kit
Stop/start system
Electric steering system
Sports suspension
Dual exhaust
Driver and front passenger airbags
Front side airbags
Front curtain airbags
Driver’s knee airbag
ISOFIX points for all rear seats
Child seat anchor points
Headrests for driver and front passenger
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD)
Brake assist
Electronic stability program (ESP)
Traction control
Tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS)
Reversing camera – in the infotainment system
Electrochromatic rear vision mirror
Electric side mirrors
Heated side mirrors
Electric windows – front only with auto up/down function for all windows
HID headlights
LED side indicators integrated into side mirrors
Automatic headlights
Daytime running lights (DRL)
LED tail lights
Interior ambient lighting
Rain-sensing (auto) wipers
Remote central locking with keyless entry (via a button on the door handle)
Push button start
Engine immobiliser
Tachometer
Fuel gauge
Trip computer
Colour driver’s display
Manual handbrake
Steering wheel – tilt (up/down) and telescopic (reach) adjust
Leather steering wheel
Leather gear knob and handbrake
Dual-zone climate control
Sports seats
Leather upholstery
6-Way electrically adjustable driver’s seat
Electric lumbar support adjustment for the driver
Seat heating: driver and front passenger
Seat ventilation: driver and front passenger
8.0-inch SYNC-2 touchscreen
9-speaker sound system
AM/FM radio
Bluetooth connectivity – phone and audio streaming
Satellite navigation
iPod connectivity
USB connectivity
2x cup holders – front
Centre console storage
Glovebox
Vanity mirror for driver and front passenger

MY17 updates:

SYNC3 infotainment system

MY18 updates:

New shock absorbers
New cross-axis joint in rear suspension
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB) with pedestrian detection
Lane departure warning
Lane keeping assist
Adaptive cruise control
12.4-inch digital instrument display

MY19 updates:

Brembo brakes
Quad tail pipe finishers
LED headlights
12-speaker B&O Play sound system

High Performance

Price when new: $50,990 - $61,890

Price used: $42,350 - $66,500

Introduced in November 2017, the High Performance brought more power to the 2.3-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder engine, as well as a limited-slip differential, variable sports exhaust system and stiffer stabiliser bars.

Additional features:

Limited-slip differential
Brembo brakes
Variable sports exhaust system
Stiffer stabiliser bars

GT

Price when new: $57,490 - $75,990

Price used: $36,150 - $81,950

The GT is the flagship V8 model of the Mustang range sporting a 5.0 naturally-aspirated V8 engine, mated to either a six-speed manual or an optional six-speed automatic transmission, and was available in either a coupé or convertible (auto only). The GT adds six-pot ventilated Brembo brakes, rear parking sensors and quad tailpipe finishers.

Updates later in the model life included an optional 10-speed automatic transmission, SYNC3 infotainment system, AED, lane keeping assist, lane departure warning, adaptive cruise control, LED headlights and B&O play sound system.

Additional features:

6-spot ventilated Brembo brakes
Rear parking sensors
Quad tail pipe finishers

MY17 updates:

SYNC3 infotainment system

MY18 updates:

New shock absorbers
New cross-axis joint in the rear suspension
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB) with pedestrian detection
Lane-departure warning
Lane-keeping assist
Adaptive cruise control
LED headlights
High-beam assist
12-inch digital instrument display
12-speaker B&O play sound system

BULLITT

Price when new: $73,688

Price used: $64,300 - $78,800

Taken after the 1968 classic, the BULLITT Mustang is a special edition model commemorating the original 1968 BULLITT Mustang.

The model could be identified by its “Dark Highland Green” and “Shadow Black” paint jobs with 19-inch “Torque Thrust” alloy wheels, red brake callipers and Recaro Sports seats with BULLITT embroidery and green stitching.

Additional Features:

19-inch “Torque Thrust” alloy wheels
Red-painted Brembo brakes
MagneRide adaptive suspension
Heated steering wheel
Recaro sports seats

Mach 1

Price when new: $83,365

Price used: $69,600 - $82,400

The heritage-inspired Mach 1 was introduced in the second quarter of 2021 and features the same uprated V8 engine in the BULLITT, as well as GT500 rear axle cooler, lower diffuser, intake manifold and engine oil cooler.

Cosmetically, the Mach 1 features its own tuned active exhaust, bonnet stripes, gloss black front grilles and unique 19-inch alloy wheels.

Additional features:

GT500 rear axle cooler, lower diffuser, intake manifold, engine oil cooler
Bonnet stripes
Gloss black front grilles
MagneRide adaptive suspension
Mach 1 active exhaust

R-Spec

Price when new: $99,980

Price used: $84,050 - $102,100

The R-Spec is a more powerful limited edition version of the V8 Mustang, sporting 552kW of power from a 5.0 litre supercharged V8 engine, mated exclusively to a six-speed manual.

The R-Spec also featured unique 19-inch alloy wheels, Herrod Performance Exhaust System, 20mm lower ride height and MagneRide adaptive suspension.

Only 500 units were produced.

Additional features:

R-Spec 19-inch black alloy wheels
Herrod Performance exhaust system
20mm lower ride height
MagneRide adaptive suspension

We’re going to take a wild guess here, if you’re seriously considering buying a Mustang, no matter what this Cheat Sheet says about it, you’re probably just going to buy one regardless, aren’t you? Thought so.

Obviously, there’s no valid reason you should ever buy a Mustang, the build quality is questionable, the levels of safety even more so, yes it’s pretty quick but not in any nuanced or highly refined or dynamic way, it’s not all that practical, it’s so thirsty when you flex that right foot and it’s all a bit loud and obnoxious.

But, the minute you get into experiencing it, all of that is forgotten, actually, it’s more ignored than forgotten but that’s why we love the Mustang.

The majority of cars today are sensible and safe, they’ll get from A to B without any hassle or fuss and honestly, they’re just so bloody dull.

The Mustang isn’t, it just makes you feel good, it’s fun, it has character and charm and of course, it’s so far from perfect but thank god because perfect is boring.

Should you buy one? Of course not, but you should so buy one.

Just get the most recent example you can and please have it thoroughly inspected before you hand over your cash.

We’re going to take a wild guess here, if you’re seriously considering buying a Mustang, no matter what this Cheat Sheet says about it, you’re probably just going to buy one regardless, aren’t you? Thought so.

Obviously, there’s no valid reason you should ever buy a Mustang, the build quality is questionable, the levels of safety even more so, yes it’s pretty quick but not in any nuanced or highly refined or dynamic way, it’s not all that practical, it’s so thirsty when you flex that right foot and it’s all a bit loud and obnoxious.

But, the minute you get into experiencing it, all of that is forgotten, actually, it’s more ignored than forgotten but that’s why we love the Mustang.

The majority of cars today are sensible and safe, they’ll get from A to B without any hassle or fuss and honestly, they’re just so bloody dull.

The Mustang isn’t, it just makes you feel good, it’s fun, it has character and charm and of course, it’s so far from perfect but thank god because perfect is boring.

Should you buy one? Of course not, but you should so buy one.

Just get the most recent example you can and please have it thoroughly inspected before you hand over your cash.

We’re going to take a wild guess here, if you’re seriously considering buying a Mustang, no matter what this Cheat Sheet says about it, you’re probably just going to buy one regardless, aren’t you? Thought so.

Obviously, there’s no valid reason you should ever buy a Mustang, the build quality is questionable, the levels of safety even more so, yes it’s pretty quick but not in any nuanced or highly refined or dynamic way, it’s not all that practical, it’s so thirsty when you flex that right foot and it’s all a bit loud and obnoxious.

But, the minute you get into experiencing it, all of that is forgotten, actually, it’s more ignored than forgotten but that’s why we love the Mustang.

The majority of cars today are sensible and safe, they’ll get from A to B without any hassle or fuss and honestly, they’re just so bloody dull.

The Mustang isn’t, it just makes you feel good, it’s fun, it has character and charm and of course, it’s so far from perfect but thank god because perfect is boring.

Should you buy one? Of course not, but you should so buy one.

Just get the most recent example you can and please have it thoroughly inspected before you hand over your cash.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of February 10, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

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