Pros

  • Plenty to love, if you want those big, hefty SUV vibes.
  • Great driving experience.
  • There’s a Grand Cherokee to suit nearly every budget (just be careful of the really cheap ones).

Cons

  • Jeep don’t have a great track record for after sales service.
  • Jeep don’t have a great track record with reliability, either.
  • High chance of things going ‘bang’.

Verdict

Well you know what, for all of the Jeep horror stories and for as much criticism as the Grand Cherokee receives, there are these almost unicorn examples out there and owners that genuinely have never had an issue, but.

Buying a Grand Cherokee comes with an enormous warning, you absolutely...

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2020

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For over a decade the due-for-retirement WK Grand Cherokee pulled its weight in changing Aussie perception that Jeeps were antiquated, unreliable and old hat. Here was an SUV range offering big comfort, lots of room, with solid capabilities worthy of a proper Jeep and a lot of kit and goodies for less money than the European family haulers it would inevitably be compared with. I drew critical praise and won over a lot of fans in the ownership experience.

This fourth-generation Grand Cherokee was different kind of Jeep and felt as much in the experience. The secret sauce was that it was twinned off a platform shared with the Mercedes- Benz ML-Class, with quality core DNA and riding on fully independent suspension. This generation would spawn buck-banging V6 rear-drive petrols, all-purpose diesel versions and some thumping high-performance wagons such as the thunderous, supercharged SRT Trackhawk.

The WK first lobbed in 2011 in no fewer than ten guises, from the cheapy 3.6L petrol V6 Laredo ($45k) to high-spec Limited in six ($55k) and 5.7-litre V8 ($60k) power, to the flagship Overland ($70k) as well as a number of 3.0L turbodiesel variants at all variant tiers. All were five-speed autos with constant all-wheel drive. The first proper muscle version, the SRT8, lobbed in 2012, powered by a 344kW/624Nm 6.4L naturally aspirated V8, its stunning sub-five-second 0-100km/h matched with extraordinary 14.1L/100km claimed thirst that was worse in practice. But for its $76k ask there was nothing else on sale quite like it. Not

For over a decade the due-for-retirement WK Grand Cherokee pulled its weight in changing Aussie perception that Jeeps were antiquated, unreliable and old hat. Here was an SUV range offering big comfort, lots of room, with solid capabilities worthy of a proper Jeep and a lot of kit and goodies for less money than the European family haulers it would inevitably be compared with. I drew critical praise and won over a lot of fans in the ownership experience.

This fourth-generation Grand Cherokee was different kind of Jeep and felt as much in the experience. The secret sauce was that it was twinned off a platform shared with the Mercedes- Benz ML-Class, with quality core DNA and riding on fully independent suspension. This generation would spawn buck-banging V6 rear-drive petrols, all-purpose diesel versions and some thumping high-performance wagons such as the thunderous, supercharged SRT Trackhawk.

The WK first lobbed in 2011 in no fewer than ten guises, from the cheapy 3.6L petrol V6 Laredo ($45k) to high-spec Limited in six ($55k) and 5.7-litre V8 ($60k) power, to the flagship Overland ($70k) as well as a number of 3.0L turbodiesel variants at all variant tiers. All were five-speed autos with constant all-wheel drive. The first proper muscle version, the SRT8, lobbed in 2012, powered by a 344kW/624Nm 6.4L naturally aspirated V8, its stunning sub-five-second 0-100km/h matched with extraordinary 14.1L/100km claimed thirst that was worse in practice. But for its $76k ask there was nothing else on sale quite like it. Not that regular guises lacked poke. Outputs are 259kW/590Nm for the 5.7 petrol and 177kW/550Nm for the 3.0 diesel. In late 2012, some variants migrated to six-speed autos. The Overland’s Quadra-trak II four-wheel drive also proved quite capable across a variety of terrains and off-road chops remained a Grand Cherokee hallmark, though serious 4×4 punters could option eLSD-functional Quadra-Drive II on some examples. The Quadra-Lift air suspension package could even be optioned (for $2500) on the base Laredo.

The Trailhawk badge arrived for MY13, essentially a more off-road oriented diesel spin, at $68k and featuring similar features to the Limited long considered the sweet spot in the range. For MY14, eight-speed autos became he staple transmission choice and the Laredo could now be had as a buck-banging rear-driver for $45k driveaway. Around here, the diesel choice upped outputs to 184kW and 570Nm, which is rated for 3500kg of braked towing. Sporadic special editions, such as the Summit ($75k), Blackhawk ($50k-$55k) and SRT8 Alpine ($82k) expanded what had become a dizzying choice of variations offered throughout the WK’s lifecycle. MY18 brought a mild revision to front end styling, new wheels and measures to make the breed quieter in cabin, though the wider range continued to mix familiar badge tiers and powertrains, though features did get pusher as the lifecycle drew on. Then the SRT Trackhawk arrived, oh so quickly…

With a ludicrous 522kW and 868Nm of 6.2-litres of supercharged V8 stonk, the SRT Trackhawk’s wild 3.7sec 0-100km/h prowess made it one of the quickest vehicles on sale in Oz when it lobbed in 2017 for MY18. And at $135k-$140k, it remained the pinnacle of the breed, for sheer excess, through to 2021.

The WK survives in its final days – as a slimmed-down three-variant range – in Jeep showrooms alongside a new, fifth-generation ‘WL’ Grand Cherokee L seven-seater, to be finally phased out when five-seat versions of the newbie arrives later this year.

For over a decade the due-for-retirement WK Grand Cherokee pulled its weight in changing Aussie perception that Jeeps were antiquated, unreliable and old hat. Here was an SUV range offering big comfort, lots of room, with solid capabilities worthy of a proper Jeep and a lot of kit and goodies for less money than the European family haulers it would inevitably be compared with. I drew critical praise and won over a lot of fans in the ownership experience.

This fourth-generation Grand Cherokee was different kind of Jeep and felt as much in the experience. The secret sauce was that it was twinned off a platform shared with the Mercedes- Benz ML-Class, with quality core DNA and riding on fully independent suspension. This generation would spawn buck-banging V6 rear-drive petrols, all-purpose diesel versions and some thumping high-performance wagons such as the thunderous, supercharged SRT Trackhawk.

The WK first lobbed in 2011 in no fewer than ten guises, from the cheapy 3.6L petrol V6 Laredo ($45k) to high-spec Limited in six ($55k) and 5.7-litre V8 ($60k) power, to the flagship Overland ($70k) as well as a number of 3.0L turbodiesel variants at all variant tiers. All were five-speed autos with constant all-wheel drive. The first proper muscle version, the SRT8, lobbed in 2012, powered by a 344kW/624Nm 6.4L naturally aspirated V8, its stunning sub-five-second 0-100km/h matched with extraordinary 14.1L/100km claimed thirst that was worse in practice. But for its $76k ask there was nothing else on sale quite like it. Not that regular guises lacked poke. Outputs are 259kW/590Nm for the 5.7 petrol and 177kW/550Nm for the 3.0 diesel. In late 2012, some variants migrated to six-speed autos. The Overland’s Quadra-trak II four-wheel drive also proved quite capable across a variety of terrains and off-road chops remained a Grand Cherokee hallmark, though serious 4×4 punters could option eLSD-functional Quadra-Drive II on some examples. The Quadra-Lift air suspension package could even be optioned (for $2500) on the base Laredo.

The Trailhawk badge arrived for MY13, essentially a more off-road oriented diesel spin, at $68k and featuring similar features to the Limited long considered the sweet spot in the range. For MY14, eight-speed autos became he staple transmission choice and the Laredo could now be had as a buck-banging rear-driver for $45k driveaway. Around here, the diesel choice upped outputs to 184kW and 570Nm, which is rated for 3500kg of braked towing. Sporadic special editions, such as the Summit ($75k), Blackhawk ($50k-$55k) and SRT8 Alpine ($82k) expanded what had become a dizzying choice of variations offered throughout the WK’s lifecycle. MY18 brought a mild revision to front end styling, new wheels and measures to make the breed quieter in cabin, though the wider range continued to mix familiar badge tiers and powertrains, though features did get pusher as the lifecycle drew on. Then the SRT Trackhawk arrived, oh so quickly…

With a ludicrous 522kW and 868Nm of 6.2-litres of supercharged V8 stonk, the SRT Trackhawk’s wild 3.7sec 0-100km/h prowess made it one of the quickest vehicles on sale in Oz when it lobbed in 2017 for MY18. And at $135k-$140k, it remained the pinnacle of the breed, for sheer excess, through to 2021.

The WK survives in its final days – as a slimmed-down three-variant range – in Jeep showrooms alongside a new, fifth-generation ‘WL’ Grand Cherokee L seven-seater, to be finally phased out when five-seat versions of the newbie arrives later this year.

  • There are a few reports that some fuel fillers are either incredibly sensitive to the Grand Cherokees inlet design and just constantly want to shut off, or the complete opposite happens and they can overflow. This is as much an issue with the actual fuel fillers as it is the Jeep, but bloody annoying either way.
  • Oh also, the actual fuel door can apparently break off really easily.
  • There are loads of reports that really anything electronic can glitch out or fail. Make sure you check that all the windows work, the power mirrors work, that the powered tailgate works, that the sunroof works, check all the lights, if it has electricity running to it, does it work.
  • Also, if the Grand Cherokee you’re looking at is fitted with any aftermarket gear, is it high quality stuff, has it been fitted professionally and does it all work?
  • There are some reports of rust and corrosion forming but mainly around coastal areas or in cold climates when roads are covered in salt.
  • There are more and more stories of the seal around the windscreen wearing out and then leaking.
  • Inside, there are loads of reports that leather interiors are not ageing at all well. Leather dashboards are commonly known to crack, peel, wrinkle or fade and especially if not garaged regularly.
  • The U-Connect infotainment screen can glitch out or go blank, sometimes showing different colours like blue or green and it can happen when reversing so the camera is pointless.
  • The “keyless go” system can fail, this is usually due to a faulty receiver antenna that needs replacing.
  • There are many reports of air conditioning problems, specifically the air condenser just failing after a certain amount of time. Fixing this in some circumstances can require the entire dashboard coming out of the car and that will be very expensive.
  • Certain speakers have been known to fail which need replacing, in some instances it’s been the same speaker more than once. Speakers fitted in the door liner can apparently get quite rattly too.
  • And again like the exterior, there are seemingly endless reports of a vast array of electronic gremlins occurring, some just annoying but others being downright terrifying.
  • The 3.0 V6 Turbo diesel by the Italian manufacturer VM motori, has an interesting reputation. There are 2 distinct camps here the ones that have towed a caravan all around the country and never had a problem, and the other whose definition of an off-road vehicle has meant their vehicle has been off the road in a workshop for months on end.
  • But if you stick to the facts and look at the statistics, there’s a good reason they’re at the lower
  • There are a few reports that some fuel fillers are either incredibly sensitive to the Grand Cherokees inlet design and just constantly want to shut off, or the complete opposite happens and they can overflow. This is as much an issue with the actual fuel fillers as it is the Jeep, but bloody annoying either way.
  • Oh also, the actual fuel door can apparently break off really easily.
  • There are loads of reports that really anything electronic can glitch out or fail. Make sure you check that all the windows work, the power mirrors work, that the powered tailgate works, that the sunroof works, check all the lights, if it has electricity running to it, does it work.
  • Also, if the Grand Cherokee you’re looking at is fitted with any aftermarket gear, is it high quality stuff, has it been fitted professionally and does it all work?
  • There are some reports of rust and corrosion forming but mainly around coastal areas or in cold climates when roads are covered in salt.
  • There are more and more stories of the seal around the windscreen wearing out and then leaking.
  • Inside, there are loads of reports that leather interiors are not ageing at all well. Leather dashboards are commonly known to crack, peel, wrinkle or fade and especially if not garaged regularly.
  • The U-Connect infotainment screen can glitch out or go blank, sometimes showing different colours like blue or green and it can happen when reversing so the camera is pointless.
  • The “keyless go” system can fail, this is usually due to a faulty receiver antenna that needs replacing.
  • There are many reports of air conditioning problems, specifically the air condenser just failing after a certain amount of time. Fixing this in some circumstances can require the entire dashboard coming out of the car and that will be very expensive.
  • Certain speakers have been known to fail which need replacing, in some instances it’s been the same speaker more than once. Speakers fitted in the door liner can apparently get quite rattly too.
  • And again like the exterior, there are seemingly endless reports of a vast array of electronic gremlins occurring, some just annoying but others being downright terrifying.
  • The 3.0 V6 Turbo diesel by the Italian manufacturer VM motori, has an interesting reputation. There are 2 distinct camps here the ones that have towed a caravan all around the country and never had a problem, and the other whose definition of an off-road vehicle has meant their vehicle has been off the road in a workshop for months on end.
  • But if you stick to the facts and look at the statistics, there’s a good reason they’re at the lower end of the reliability ranks. Some of the less serious problems they have are the usual EGR and DPF complications that all modern diesels have. A slightly more serious problem though is engine oil cooler failure where the engine oil and coolant get cross contaminated. Which isn’t good for engines or cooling systems.
  • There’s also occasions where the oil pump and bypass valves have failed causing loss of oil pressure and subsequent engine failure.
  • Reports of catastrophic engine failures from camshaft gears slipping on the camshafts. It’s not uncommon in modern engines to have this style of tapered press fit instead of a key. And there’s no preventative maintenance you can do to avoid this problem occurring. It’s just unlucky if it happens.
  • Aside from the long list of potential engine problems, there are transmission complications and plenty of software glitches and electrical gremlins. If you absolutely have to have one (because of the advertised towing capacity or for any other reason) or you already have one, I just really hope you’re one of the lucky ones that tows your caravan all around the country and never has a problem.
  • No start due to brake pedal position switch fault
  • Service interval reminder glitch
  • Weird rattling sound under car when idling from SCR (selective catalyst reduction) system where the heat shields rubs on the supply pipe.
  • There are a few reports that some fuel fillers are either incredibly sensitive to the Grand Cherokees inlet design and just constantly want to shut off, or the complete opposite happens and they can overflow. This is as much an issue with the actual fuel fillers as it is the Jeep, but bloody annoying either way.
  • Oh also, the actual fuel door can apparently break off really easily.
  • There are loads of reports that really anything electronic can glitch out or fail. Make sure you check that all the windows work, the power mirrors work, that the powered tailgate works, that the sunroof works, check all the lights, if it has electricity running to it, does it work.
  • Also, if the Grand Cherokee you’re looking at is fitted with any aftermarket gear, is it high quality stuff, has it been fitted professionally and does it all work?
  • There are some reports of rust and corrosion forming but mainly around coastal areas or in cold climates when roads are covered in salt.
  • There are more and more stories of the seal around the windscreen wearing out and then leaking.
  • Inside, there are loads of reports that leather interiors are not ageing at all well. Leather dashboards are commonly known to crack, peel, wrinkle or fade and especially if not garaged regularly.
  • The U-Connect infotainment screen can glitch out or go blank, sometimes showing different colours like blue or green and it can happen when reversing so the camera is pointless.
  • The “keyless go” system can fail, this is usually due to a faulty receiver antenna that needs replacing.
  • There are many reports of air conditioning problems, specifically the air condenser just failing after a certain amount of time. Fixing this in some circumstances can require the entire dashboard coming out of the car and that will be very expensive.
  • Certain speakers have been known to fail which need replacing, in some instances it’s been the same speaker more than once. Speakers fitted in the door liner can apparently get quite rattly too.
  • And again like the exterior, there are seemingly endless reports of a vast array of electronic gremlins occurring, some just annoying but others being downright terrifying.
  • The 3.0 V6 Turbo diesel by the Italian manufacturer VM motori, has an interesting reputation. There are 2 distinct camps here the ones that have towed a caravan all around the country and never had a problem, and the other whose definition of an off-road vehicle has meant their vehicle has been off the road in a workshop for months on end.
  • But if you stick to the facts and look at the statistics, there’s a good reason they’re at the lower end of the reliability ranks. Some of the less serious problems they have are the usual EGR and DPF complications that all modern diesels have. A slightly more serious problem though is engine oil cooler failure where the engine oil and coolant get cross contaminated. Which isn’t good for engines or cooling systems.
  • There’s also occasions where the oil pump and bypass valves have failed causing loss of oil pressure and subsequent engine failure.
  • Reports of catastrophic engine failures from camshaft gears slipping on the camshafts. It’s not uncommon in modern engines to have this style of tapered press fit instead of a key. And there’s no preventative maintenance you can do to avoid this problem occurring. It’s just unlucky if it happens.
  • Aside from the long list of potential engine problems, there are transmission complications and plenty of software glitches and electrical gremlins. If you absolutely have to have one (because of the advertised towing capacity or for any other reason) or you already have one, I just really hope you’re one of the lucky ones that tows your caravan all around the country and never has a problem.
  • No start due to brake pedal position switch fault
  • Service interval reminder glitch
  • Weird rattling sound under car when idling from SCR (selective catalyst reduction) system where the heat shields rubs on the supply pipe.

Body style:
5-door SUV

Engines:
Series I (2011-13) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, 70th Anniversary Edition, Limited, Overland)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, Limited, Overland, Trailhawk)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (Limited, 70th Anniversary Edition, Overland)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT8, SRT8 Alpine, SRT8 Vapor)

Series II (2013-16) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, 75th Anniversary Edition, Blackhawk, Limited, Overland)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, 75th Anniversary Edition, Blackhawk, Limited, Overland, Summit, Summit Platinum)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (Limited, Overland)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT, SRT Night)

Series III (2016 – 2022) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, Limited)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, Limited, Trailhawk, Overland, S-Overland)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (S-Limited)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT)
  • 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Trackhawk)

Power:

Series I (2011-13) engines:

  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 177kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series II (2013-16) engines:

  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 184kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series III (2016 – 2022) engines:

  • 213kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (RWD)
  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (4WD)
  • 184kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol
  • 522kW – 6.2 litre supercharged V8

Body style:
5-door SUV

Engines:
Series I (2011-13) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, 70th Anniversary Edition, Limited, Overland)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, Limited, Overland, Trailhawk)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (Limited, 70th Anniversary Edition, Overland)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT8, SRT8 Alpine, SRT8 Vapor)

Series II (2013-16) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, 75th Anniversary Edition, Blackhawk, Limited, Overland)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, 75th Anniversary Edition, Blackhawk, Limited, Overland, Summit, Summit Platinum)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (Limited, Overland)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT, SRT Night)

Series III (2016 – 2022) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, Limited)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, Limited, Trailhawk, Overland, S-Overland)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (S-Limited)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT)
  • 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Trackhawk)

Power:

Series I (2011-13) engines:

  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 177kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series II (2013-16) engines:

  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 184kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series III (2016 – 2022) engines:

  • 213kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (RWD)
  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (4WD)
  • 184kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol
  • 522kW – 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol

Torque:

Series I (2011-13) engines:

  • 347Nm – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 550Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 520Nm – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 624Nm – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series II (2013-16) engines:

  • 347Nm – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 570Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 520Nm – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 624Nm – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series III (2016 – 2022) engines:

  • 347Nm – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (RWD)
  • 347Nm – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (4WD)
  • 570Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 520Nm – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 624Nm – 6.4 litre V8 petrol
  • 868Nm – 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol

Transmission & drivetrains:

Series I (2011-13) drivelines:

  • 5-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)
  • 6-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD) – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 engine from MY12

Series II (2013-16) drivelines:

  • 8-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Laredo RWD (3.6 litre petrol V6)
  • 8-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)

Series III (2016 – 2022) drivelines:

  • 8-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Laredo RWD (3.6 litre petrol V6)
  • 8-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)

Fuel consumption:
7.5 – 16.8L/100km

Length:
4822 – 4846mm

Width:
1943 – 1954mm

Height:
1749 – 1802mm

Kerb weight:
2191 – 2424kg

Towing (braked/unbreaked):

  • 1600/750kg (3.6 litre V6 petrol – rear-wheel drive)
  • 2949/750kg (6.4 litre V8 petrol, 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol)
  • 2500/750kg (3.6 litre V6 petrol)
  • 3500/750kg (3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel, 5.7 litre V8 petrol)

Body style:
5-door SUV

Engines:
Series I (2011-13) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, 70th Anniversary Edition, Limited, Overland)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, Limited, Overland, Trailhawk)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (Limited, 70th Anniversary Edition, Overland)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT8, SRT8 Alpine, SRT8 Vapor)

Series II (2013-16) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, 75th Anniversary Edition, Blackhawk, Limited, Overland)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, 75th Anniversary Edition, Blackhawk, Limited, Overland, Summit, Summit Platinum)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (Limited, Overland)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT, SRT Night)

Series III (2016 – 2022) engines:

  • 3.6 litre V6 petrol (Laredo, Limited)
  • 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (Laredo, Limited, Trailhawk, Overland, S-Overland)
  • 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol (S-Limited)
  • 6.4 litre V8 petrol (SRT)
  • 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Trackhawk)

Power:

Series I (2011-13) engines:

  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 177kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series II (2013-16) engines:

  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 184kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series III (2016 – 2022) engines:

  • 213kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (RWD)
  • 210kW – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (4WD)
  • 184kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 259kW – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 344kW – 6.4 litre V8 petrol
  • 522kW – 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol

Torque:

Series I (2011-13) engines:

  • 347Nm – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 550Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 520Nm – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 624Nm – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series II (2013-16) engines:

  • 347Nm – 3.6 litre V6 petrol
  • 570Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 520Nm – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 624Nm – 6.4 litre V8 petrol

Series III (2016 – 2022) engines:

  • 347Nm – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (RWD)
  • 347Nm – 3.6 litre V6 petrol (4WD)
  • 570Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel
  • 520Nm – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 petrol
  • 624Nm – 6.4 litre V8 petrol
  • 868Nm – 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol

Transmission & drivetrains:

Series I (2011-13) drivelines:

  • 5-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)
  • 6-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD) – 5.7 litre HEMI V8 engine from MY12

Series II (2013-16) drivelines:

  • 8-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Laredo RWD (3.6 litre petrol V6)
  • 8-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)

Series III (2016 – 2022) drivelines:

  • 8-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Laredo RWD (3.6 litre petrol V6)
  • 8-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)

Fuel consumption:
7.5 – 16.8L/100km

Length:
4822 – 4846mm

Width:
1943 – 1954mm

Height:
1749 – 1802mm

Kerb weight:
2191 – 2424kg

Towing (braked/unbreaked):

  • 1600/750kg (3.6 litre V6 petrol – rear-wheel drive)
  • 2949/750kg (6.4 litre V8 petrol, 6.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol)
  • 2500/750kg (3.6 litre V6 petrol)
  • 3500/750kg (3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel, 5.7 litre V8 petrol)

Warranty:

3 years/100,000kms

5 years/100,000kms (MY17 models)

Servicing:

12 months/12,000kms

Model range, pricing & features

Jeep Grand Cherokee-1

Laredo

Price when new: $43,000 - $59,000

Price used: $8,100 - $52,000

Released in January 2011, the Laredo model is the base model of the Grand Cherokee range, available with either a 3.6 litre Penstar V6 engine or a 3.0 litre turbocharged V6 diesel engine.

Initially available with a 5-speed automatic, this was upgraded to an 8-speed automatic with Series II models. Furthermore the Laredo models were available in a rear-wheel drive (RWD) variant in Series II and III models.

Series II brought a revised design, larger LED tail lights, new alloy wheel designs and steering wheel paddle shifters.

The Series III update also brought a cosmetic refresh in addition to stop/start for the 3.6 V6 petrol engine, front and rear parking sensors, a larger UConnect infotainment screen and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Standard features:

  • 18-inch alloy wheels
  • Roof rails
  • Separate opening for rear glass
  • Quadra-Trac II full-time 4WD
  • Selec-Terrain System (5x traction control settings: Automatic, Sport, Snow, Sand/Mud, Rock)
  • Solar control tinted glass
  • 5-star ANCAP safety rating (tested 2014)
  • 4-star ANCAP safety rating (tested 2011 – diesel variants only)
  • 7x airbags: driver and front passenger, driver’s knee, side impact and full-length curtain airbags
  • Three point seatbelts for all passengers
  • Height adjustable front seatbelts with pretensioners and load limiters
  • Rear seatbelt load limiters
  • Seatbelt reminder – front seats
  • Adjustable head restraints for all seats
  • Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
  • Electronic brake force distribution (EBD)
  • Electronic brake assist (EBA)
  • Electronic stability control (ESC)
  • Traction control
  • Rollover stability control
  • Trailer sway control
  • Hill descent control (HDC)
  • Hill start assist (HSA)
  • Tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS)
  • Reversing camera
  • Alarm system
  • Bi-xenon headlights
  • Front and rear fog lights
  • Daytime running lights
  • Auto on/off headlights
  • Auto dipping high and low beam
  • Rain-sensing wipers with intermittent settings and speed-sensitive
  • Electrochromatic rear view mirror
  • Cruise control
  • Dual-zone climate control
  • Electric folding and heated side mirrors
  • Electric windows – front and rear with driver and front passenger auto up/down function
  • Electric door locks
  • Leather-wrapped multi-functional steering wheel
  • Steering wheel manual adjustment – tilt and telescopic reach adjust
  • Audio and cruise control buttons on steering wheel
  • Fabric seat upholstery
  • Heated front seats
  • 8-way electric seat adjustment of front seats
  • 4-way electric lumbar adjustment of front seats
  • 6-speaker sound system
  • 6.5-inch touch screen infotainment system (Uconnect)
  • AM/FM radio
  • CD player
  • Bluetooth connectivity – calling and music streaming
  • 30GB hard drive
  • Voice command
  • USB input
  • AUX input
  • 12V auxiliary power socket
  • Interior lights: LED map lamps, two dome lamps, glove box lamp, courtesy door lamps and rear-passenger overhead reading/courtesy lamps
  • Sunglasses compartment
  • 60:40 rear folding seat
  • Carpeted luggage area
  • Removable waterproof load floor panel
  • Rear storage tray
  • 4x cargo tie down hooks
  • 2 utility hooks

Series II (2013-16) updates:

  • New bumpers, headlight design and daytime running light cluster
  • Larger LED tail-lights
  • New alloy wheel designs
  • Steering wheel paddle-shifters

Series III (2016-22) updates:

  • Stop/start system for 3.6 V6 petrol engine
  • Electric power steering
  • Slimmer redesigned grille
  • Unique front fascia and fog lamps
  • Front and rear parking sensors
  • 8.4-inch touchscreen infotainment system (4×4 models only)

2017 updates:

  • 7.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system (all Laredo models)
  • Wired Apple CarPlay
  • Wired Android Auto

70th Anniversary Edition

Price when new: $58,500 - $63,500

Price used: $11,700 - $20,100

Released in May 2011, the 70th Anniversary Edition commemorated Jeep’s 70th Anniversary and was based on the base Laredo model.

The limited edition model largely consisted of cosmetic additions, 20-inch alloy wheels and leather upholstery.

In addition to the Laredo:

  • 20-inch polished aluminium wheels
  • Stainless steel Mopar grille
  • Dual-pane panoramic sunroof
  • 70th Anniversary badging
  • Black Lacewood’ interior trim/finish
  • Chestnut accents – for seats, steering wheel, door and centre console
  • Leather upholstery
  • Beber floor mats

Blackhawk

Price when new: $50,000 - $62,000

Price used: $14,800 - $48,100

Released in July 2014, the Blackhawk was a ‘rugged” black pack limited edition model that was based on the Laredo model added a black styling pack, heated front seats and a suede/leather upholstery.

In August 2015, the Blackhawk special edition model was released again offering similar features to the 2014 edition.

In addition to the Laredo:

2014 edition:

  • 20-inch gloss black painted alloy wheels
  • Body-coloured grille with gloss black and platinum accents
  • Black ‘Jeep’ and ‘Blackhawk’ badging
  • Deep tinted windows
  • Suede/leather upholstery
  • Heated front seats

2015 edition:

  • 20-inch alloy wheels
  • Black styling pack
  • Black ‘Capri’ leather upholstery with suede inserts
  • Black accent stitching
  • Heated front seats

Night Eagle

Price when new: $58,450 - $66,950

Price used: $39,400 - $67,200

The Night Eagle was a limited edition model based on the Laredo base model, and was released in June 2019 and available with the 3.6L petrol V6 and 3.0L turbocharged V6 diesel engine.

This model could be identified by its 20-inch alloy wheels, black styling pack exterior, ‘Capri’ leather upholstery and 8.4-inch UConnect infotainment system screen.

In addition to the Laredo:

  • 20-inch alloy wheels
  • Black seven-slot grille with silver mesh inserts
  • Black exterior finishes
  • Black ‘Capri’ leather upholstery
  • Power single-pane sunroof
  • 8.4-inch infotainment system

Limited

Price when new: $55,000 - $69,950

Price used: $9,800 - $61,800

The Limited model is the premium/mid-range model in the Grand Cherokee range.

The Limited was available with the 3.6 litre petrol V6, 3.0 litre turbo diesel V6 and the 5.7 litre HEMI V8 engine.

In addition to the Laredo, the Limited received 20-inch alloy wheels, privacy glass, tyre pressure monitoring system, memory functions, electric steering wheel adjustment, Capri leather upholstery and 9-speaker Alpine audio system.

Series II updates gained an 8.4 touchscreen infotainment system and satellite navigation.

In addition to the Laredo:

20-inch alloy wheels
Privacy glass
Front and rear parking sensors
Tyre pressure monitoring display system
“Memory function: radio station presets, last station settings, driver’s seat position, exterior mirrors, power tilt/telescoping steering wheel settings for two drivers, actuated from driver’s door panel for each
unique key fob ”
Electric folding mirrors – heated, memory functions, auto-dimming and side indicators
Steering wheel electric adjustment – tilt and telescopic reach adjust
Capri leather upholstery
Heated second row seats
9-speaker Alpine audio system

Series II (2013-16) updates:
8.4-inch touchscreen infotainment system (Uconnect)
Satellite navigation

Trailhawk

Price when new: $68,000 - $77,450

Price used: $16,000 - $76,700

160x examples for 4×4 enthusiasts, then for 2017 became a permanent model

Based on the Limited model, the Trailhawk was introduced as a special edition in March 2013 with 160-model made available in Australia with the 3.0-litre turbocharged V6 diesel engine.

The main addition to the Trailhawk model is the Quadra-lift 4×4 system and air suspension, as well as a heated steering wheel, Trailhawk logos and badging, heated seats and satellite navigation.

In 2016, the Series III update was released and with it, the Trailhawk model became a permanent addition to the range and featured black and gun-metal styling cues, Nappa leather upholstery and the Quadra-lift 4×4 system and air suspension.

In addition to the Limited:

  • Quadra-lift 4×4 system
  • Quadra-lift air suspension
  • Heated steering wheel
  • Leather/suede upholstery
  • Trailhawk logos and badging
  • Heated seats
  • Satellite navigation
  • Mopar slush mats

Series III permanent model:

  • In addition to the Limited:
  • Quadra-lift 4×4 system
  • Quadra-lift air suspension
  • Nappa leather upholstery with perforated suede inserts
  • Red accent stitching (for seats, doors and console)
  • Piano black appliques
  • Gun-metal finish for painted interior parts
  • Trailhawk badge on the steering wheel

75th Anniversary edition

Price when new: $64,500 - $71,500

Price used: $27,400 - $40,800

The 75th Anniversary Edition was a limited edition model based on the Limited spec model in the Grand Cherokee range. It was released in 2016 to commemorate Jeep’s 75th Anniversary in Australia.

It largely was fitted with cosmetic additions such as bronze 20-inch alloy wheels, unique front fascia, gloss black painted body accents, Tangerine stitching accents on the seats, centre console and armrests along with Moroccan Sun painted interior elements.

In addition to the Limited:

  • Bronze 20-inch alloy wheels and roof rails, a bronze rear step pad applique, grille throats and lower basic surround and bronze 75th Anniversary badging
  • Unique front fascia, grille and headlamps
  • Gloss black painted body accents
  • Debossed’ 75th Anniversary front seat back logos
  • Tangerine stitching accents on the seats, centre console and armrests along with Moroccan Sun painted interior elements
  • Morocco Black cloth trim with ‘Linen to Black’ ombre mesh cloth seat inserts.

S-Limited

Price when new: $71,450 - $74,450

Price used: $47,700 - $75,300

Released in April 2019, a limited run S-Limited was released offering a variety of cosmetic additions and a dual-pane panoramic sunroof.

In addition to the Limited:

  • 20-inch ‘Granite Crystal’ alloy wheels
  • Dark lens tail lamps
  • Black chrome trapezoidal exhaust tips
  • Heritage’ leather upholstery
  • Liquid Titanium accents
  • Dual-pane panoramic sunroof

Overland

Price when new: $65,000 - $80,000

Price used: $12,600 - $71,000

The Overland is the next model in the range above the Limited, and featured the Quadra-Drive II full-time 4WD system, air suspension, front and rear electronic limited slip differentials, adaptive cruise control, additional safety equipment (blind spot monitoring, rear cross traffic alert), nappa leather upholstery, ventilated front seats and satellite navigation.

Series II models added forward collision warning plus with mitigation.

In addition to the Limited:

  • Quadra-Drive II full-time 4WD
  • Front and rear electronic limited slip differentials
  • Air suspension
  • Adaptive cruise control
  • Blind spot monitoring
  • Rear cross traffic alert
  • Front collision warning
  • Power tailgate
  • Dual pane panoramic sunroof
  • Nappa leather upholstery
  • Ventilated front seats
  • Satellite navigation

Series II (2013-16) updates:

  • Forward collision warning plus (FCW+) with mitigation

Summit

Price when new: $75,000 - $79,000

Price used: $23,200 - $76,700

The Summit was a limited edition model based on the Overland and released on November 2013 – available with the 3.0 litre turbocharged V6 diesel engine.

The Summit model was aimed to be a more luxury-oriented and refined version of the Overland sporting luxury-orientated styling features, 19-speaker Harmon Kardon sound system, ‘NaturaPlus’ leather upholstery, suede-like headlining and open-pore wood interior trim.

In addition to the Overland:

  • 20-inch satin finish alloy wheels
  • Unique lower front facia with chrome bar
  • Body-coloured wheel arch flares
  • Chrome lower door finishers
  • Summit’ tailgate badge
  • 19-speaker Harman Hardon surround sound system
  • NaturaPlus’ leather upholstery
  • Suede-like headlining
  • Open-pore wood interior trim

Summit Platinum

Price when new: $81,000 - $87,000

Price used: $80,000 - $86,000

The Summit Platinum was a limited edition model based on the Overland and released on February 2015 – available with the 3.0 litre turbocharged V6 diesel engine.

The Summit Platinum model was also aimed to be a more refined and luxury-orientated model with features like laminated windscreens and active noise cancellation in addition to the 19-speaker Harmon Kardon sound system and Berge carpet cargo compartment floor mats.

In addition to the Overland:

  • 20-inch chrome alloy wheels
  • Platinum styling cues (grille, front fog lamp bezels, side sills, rear boot step pad)
  • Laminated windscreens (front and rear)
  • Active noise cancellation
  • 19-speaker Harman Hardon surround sound system
  • Berger carpet cargo compartment floor mat

S-Overland

Price when new: $82,950 - $84,450

Price used: $75,000 - $87,000

Released in April 2019, a limited run S-Overland was released offering a variety of cosmetic additions, Nappa leather upholstery and a 19-speaker Harmon Kardon sound system.

In addition to the Overland:

  • 20-inch ‘Granite Crystal’ alloy wheels
  • Dark lens tail lamps
  • Black chrome trapezoidal exhaust tips
  • Nappa leather upholstery with perforated suede inserts
  • Suede door bolsters
  • 19-speaker Harman Hardon surround sound system

SRT-8

Price when new: $76,000

Price used: $26,100 - $36,700

The SRT-8 was the Series I performance model of the Grand Cherokee range, and offered a 6.4 litre V8 engine as a standard in addition to 20-inch alloy wheels and Nappa leather upholstery with suede trim.

In addition to the Limited:

  • 20-inch forged alloy wheels
  • Nappa leather upholstery with suede trim

SRT

Price when new: $77,000 - $97,450

Price used: $33,600 - $107,300

The SRT replaced the SRT-8 with the Series II update. For the most part, the SRT kept the same specifications and features, whilst adding forward collision warning plus and adaptive headlights.

In addition to the SRT-8:

  • Forward collision warning plus (FCW+) with mitigation
  • Adaptive headlights

SRT-8 Alpine and SRT-8 Vapor

Price when new: $81,900

Price used: $29,000 - $39,400

The SRT-8 Alpine and SRT-8 Vapor were two special editions based on the SRT-8 model, and offered a black styling pack, 19-speaker sound system and dual pane panoramic sunroof.

Alpine models were available in Bright White and the Vapor models were available in Brilliant Black.

In addition to the SRT8:

  • Alpine edition offered in Bright White
  • Vapor edition offered in Brilliant Black
  • Black alloy wheels
  • Gloss black grille inserts
  • Gloss black grille surrounds and finishes
  • Gloss black lettering for ‘Jeep’ bonnet and ‘Grand Cherokee’ door badges
  • 19-speaker sound system with 825-watt amplifier
  • Dual pane panoramic sunroof

SRT Night

Price when new: $97,000

Price used: $53,700 - $67,100

The SRT night was a limited edition model, limited to 120 vehicles and based on the Series III SRT model.

In addition to the SRT, the SRT night also added 20-inch satin black ‘5Ten’ alloy wheels, black styling pack, ‘Black Laguna’ leather upholstery, 19-speaker Harmon Kardon sound system and a dual pane sunroof.

In addition to the SRT:

  • 20-inch satin black ‘5Ten’ alloy wheels
  • Black grille, lower front fascia, side window surrounds, roof and badging
  • Black Laguna’ leather upholstery with silver accent stitching
  • Black chrome and anodised silver bezels
  • 19-speaker Harmon Kardon sound system with 825-watt amplifier
  • Dual pane panoramic sunroof

Trackhawk

Price when new: $134,900 - $140,450

Price used: $89,100 - $161,900

The Trackhawk model was released in December 2017, with an initial 62 vehicles allocated to the Australian market and featured a 6.2 litre supercharged V8 engine.

The Trackhawk model featured 20-inch alloy wheels, larger front air dams, flared wheel arches, ‘Trackhawk badging’, 19-speaker Harmon Kardon sound system and a dual pane panoramic sunroof.

In addition to the SRT:

  • 20-inch titanium-finish alloy wheels
  • Larger front air dams
  • Unique bonnet with dual vents
  • Flared wheel arches
  • Gloss black rear valance
  • Black chrome quad exhaust tips
  • Trackhawk’ badging
  • 19-speaker Harmon Kardon sound system with 825-watt amplifier
  • Dual pane panoramic sunroof

Well you know what, for all of the Jeep horror stories and for as much criticism as the Grand Cherokee receives, there are these almost unicorn examples out there and owners that genuinely have never had an issue, but.

Buying a Grand Cherokee comes with an enormous warning, you absolutely must make sure any Grand Cherokee you’re looking at has a full and thorough service history, has had every factory recall taken care of and it is imperative to have it thoroughly checked over for a pre-purchase inspection before you buy.

Even then, stick with the best condition, lowest possible kilometre and most recent examples that you can afford. and we’d be opting for the petrol engines over the diesels as the money you save in fuel cost may get eaten up in repairs and maintenance.

The problem with the Grand Cherokee is that it seems that no two examples are ever the same, buying one is genuinely a gamble.

Should you buy one? Look, I personally wouldn’t because I’m not a gambling man and these just don’t grab me enough to warrant the levels of stress I’d feel waiting for something to go bang,

But like my mate that bought this one, if you love the Grand Cherokee and you’ve found an incredibly well cared for example like this one, I get it, ok buy it but you’ve been warned.

Well you know what, for all of the Jeep horror stories and for as much criticism as the Grand Cherokee receives, there are these almost unicorn examples out there and owners that genuinely have never had an issue, but.

Buying a Grand Cherokee comes with an enormous warning, you absolutely must make sure any Grand Cherokee you’re looking at has a full and thorough service history, has had every factory recall taken care of and it is imperative to have it thoroughly checked over for a pre-purchase inspection before you buy.

Even then, stick with the best condition, lowest possible kilometre and most recent examples that you can afford. and we’d be opting for the petrol engines over the diesels as the money you save in fuel cost may get eaten up in repairs and maintenance.

The problem with the Grand Cherokee is that it seems that no two examples are ever the same, buying one is genuinely a gamble.

Should you buy one? Look, I personally wouldn’t because I’m not a gambling man and these just don’t grab me enough to warrant the levels of stress I’d feel waiting for something to go bang,

But like my mate that bought this one, if you love the Grand Cherokee and you’ve found an incredibly well cared for example like this one, I get it, ok buy it but you’ve been warned.

Well you know what, for all of the Jeep horror stories and for as much criticism as the Grand Cherokee receives, there are these almost unicorn examples out there and owners that genuinely have never had an issue, but.

Buying a Grand Cherokee comes with an enormous warning, you absolutely must make sure any Grand Cherokee you’re looking at has a full and thorough service history, has had every factory recall taken care of and it is imperative to have it thoroughly checked over for a pre-purchase inspection before you buy.

Even then, stick with the best condition, lowest possible kilometre and most recent examples that you can afford. and we’d be opting for the petrol engines over the diesels as the money you save in fuel cost may get eaten up in repairs and maintenance.

The problem with the Grand Cherokee is that it seems that no two examples are ever the same, buying one is genuinely a gamble.

Should you buy one? Look, I personally wouldn’t because I’m not a gambling man and these just don’t grab me enough to warrant the levels of stress I’d feel waiting for something to go bang,

But like my mate that bought this one, if you love the Grand Cherokee and you’ve found an incredibly well cared for example like this one, I get it, ok buy it but you’ve been warned.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of June 24, 2022.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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