Likes

  • A true motoring icon, yet it is totally useable every day.
  • Standard unmolested examples offer exceptional reliability.
  • Incredible performance abilities, especially on modern tyres.
  • Far more exclusive than many equivalently priced exotics.

Dislikes

  • HUGE asking price for what ostensibly is, a 20-year-old Nissan.
  • Many examples have been abused and damaged.
  • Critical components are becoming rare and expensive.
  • So rare, expensive and potentially fast, how often can you justify really driving it?

Stuff you should know

The Nissan Skyline R34 GT-R, a formidable sports car and Nissan’s flagship performance model born between 1999 and 2002 remains an everlasting symbol of automotive excellence. From its aggressive design to its awe-inspiring performance, the R34 GTR has captivated car enthusiasts worldwide, solidifying its legendary status.

With its muscular and aerodynamic body, highlighted by flared wheel arches and aero-tested bodywork, the R34 GT-R boasts a now timeless design and like many revered JDM performance cars, has been available in a bewildering array of variants and special editions, in fact no less than 15.

Powered by the now iconic 2.6-liter twin-turbocharged inline-six RB26DETT engine, officially stated as producing 206kW (276hp), it is widely believed that the engine produced a significantly higher output. Paired with a 6-speed manual transmission, performance-tuned suspension and brakes, an all-wheel drive system called ATTESA, four-wheel steering, and a host of other performance components, the R34 GTR delivers exhilarating performance and extraordinary grip.

Beyond its performance, the R34 GT-R has achieved cultural significance through its appearances in popular media, including video games such as the renowned Gran Turismo series. The car’s rarity, limited production, and global demand have turned it into a symbol of desire, with collectors and enthusiasts yearning to own a piece of automotive history, hence the now stratospheric asking prices.

While the R34 GT-R continues to captivate hearts and minds, thanks to the majority of examples previously being affordable, combined with the car’s immense tuning possibilities, many used examples have chequered histories, often hiding accident damage and poor tuning and modifications can potentially spell disaster for the mechanicals.

The R34 GT-R in undoubtedly and icon but it is critical to do everything you can to verify the example you’re looking at is the best it can be.

What goes wrong

Exterior:

The big issue is rust. Particularly check underneath the rear of the car around the diff, rear suspension, and ATTESA system, and also the rear arches and the area around the brake light on the steel boot lid. 

Also check for rust under the bonnet particularly the strut towers and the radiator support as well as where the windscreen meets the firewall areas.

Check for pinched or crushed chassis rails where the car has been improperly jacked or hoisted, rust can gather there too.

While you’re looking underneath, some sellers are painting the entire underside of the car black. This is generally done to hide damage and rust and is never a good sign. Our advice in this situation is to run away.

There are quite a few reports of missing parts especially on the more recently imported models. Think fuse box cover, oil cap, rad cap, any carbon fibre bits, or parts like that.

The headlights and taillights are known to build up condensation inside the lens’ quite easily, this is usually down to cracks or splits in the housing.

This may seem obvious but have the car inspected for crash damage and dodgy repairs. Many GT-R’s have had trips into the scenery so check if the paint is all original.

Also on the paint, after 20 years, sometimes the paint has seen better days, and some cars are resprayed purely to fix the faded paint, but with how collectible the R34 is, any paint job needs to be of a premium standard.

 

Interior:

There are reports of random electrical problems. Some owners have complained of the gauges being faulty or the warning lights malfunctioning and certain buttons or switches failing. This can sometimes be down to problems related to the wiring harness.

The dashboard or door inserts and trim can fade if it they have seen some extra attention from the sun.

With how well-bolstered the seats are, the outer bolster can cop some serious wear and tear and become overly squidgy.

There can be a tiny flex between the centre screen and the module that controls it. This is becoming common so best to check that the screen is fully operational and has no lines across or up or down.

There are unfortunately a few reports of odometers being doctored or rolled back by swapping gauge clusters, it is critical to make sure any example you’re looking at features the vehicles original odometer cluster.

With sometimes overly firm suspension, rattles and squeaks can quickly form, generally within the dash. Finding the troublesome rattle or noise can be a nightmare to find and fix.

 

Mechanical:

When heavily modified and poorly tuned, you can expect

Exterior:

The big issue is rust. Particularly check underneath the rear of the car around the diff, rear suspension, and ATTESA system, and also the rear arches and the area around the brake light on the steel boot lid. 

Also check for rust under the bonnet particularly the strut towers and the radiator support as well as where the windscreen meets the firewall areas.

Check for pinched or crushed chassis rails where the car has been improperly jacked or hoisted, rust can gather there too.

While you’re looking underneath, some sellers are painting the entire underside of the car black. This is generally done to hide damage and rust and is never a good sign. Our advice in this situation is to run away.

There are quite a few reports of missing parts especially on the more recently imported models. Think fuse box cover, oil cap, rad cap, any carbon fibre bits, or parts like that.

The headlights and taillights are known to build up condensation inside the lens’ quite easily, this is usually down to cracks or splits in the housing.

This may seem obvious but have the car inspected for crash damage and dodgy repairs. Many GT-R’s have had trips into the scenery so check if the paint is all original.

Also on the paint, after 20 years, sometimes the paint has seen better days, and some cars are resprayed purely to fix the faded paint, but with how collectible the R34 is, any paint job needs to be of a premium standard.

 

Interior:

There are reports of random electrical problems. Some owners have complained of the gauges being faulty or the warning lights malfunctioning and certain buttons or switches failing. This can sometimes be down to problems related to the wiring harness.

The dashboard or door inserts and trim can fade if it they have seen some extra attention from the sun.

With how well-bolstered the seats are, the outer bolster can cop some serious wear and tear and become overly squidgy.

There can be a tiny flex between the centre screen and the module that controls it. This is becoming common so best to check that the screen is fully operational and has no lines across or up or down.

There are unfortunately a few reports of odometers being doctored or rolled back by swapping gauge clusters, it is critical to make sure any example you’re looking at features the vehicles original odometer cluster.

With sometimes overly firm suspension, rattles and squeaks can quickly form, generally within the dash. Finding the troublesome rattle or noise can be a nightmare to find and fix.

 

Mechanical:

When heavily modified and poorly tuned, you can expect everything from Turbo failures, camshaft issues, valve guides falling out, oil starvation, oil pumps breaking into pieces, cylinder blocks just spontaneously breaking in half, clutch issues, differential failure, the list just goes on and on.

However, in standard road-going form, the R34 GT-R is bloody reliable. The R34 was built when Nissan’s reliability was at its absolute peak, resulting in (when maintained correctly) still superb reliability.

Although it’s important to remember, these are 20-year-old cars now so issues can still arise.

Everything made of rubber will be getting a bit soft and or brittle. Things like vacuum lines, brake, and fuel lines, all the coolant hoses, and critically the timing belt.

Given the current value of the R34, it is hard to imagine that any examples are being neglected and many of them probably aren’t even being driven, but time still takes its toll on all of these components even when not being used. 

Other things to be mindful of are the ATTESA & HICAS systems. ATTESA (Advanced Total Traction Engineering System) is the hydraulically actuated all-wheel-drive torque biasing system and it is somewhat complicated. The pumps can play up, there’s solenoids and electronics that can occasionally be problematic. 

The HICAS (High Capacity Actively Controlled Steering) also has hydraulics and a host of complicated components. In some cases, owners install a delete kit instead of repairing it and some say the cars are better for it. 

Another thing that goes wrong and probably the saddest is failures from terrible modifications and bad tunes.

You can usually see the terrible modifications and poor workmanship but a bad engine tune, well you might not know about that until it’s too late. 

For example, an extra boost without fuel system upgrades is just a recipe for disaster. That extra boost might have been sustainable 15 years ago when the fuel pump, regulator, and injectors were all relatively new, but if they’re not ok now and the engine leans out for too long, it is going to kill it.

It is imperative that if you are seriously looking to buy a Nissan Skyline R34 GT-R (even with minor mods), you MUST have it inspected by a reputable specialist before you take the plunge. 

Exterior:

The big issue is rust. Particularly check underneath the rear of the car around the diff, rear suspension, and ATTESA system, and also the rear arches and the area around the brake light on the steel boot lid. 

Also check for rust under the bonnet particularly the strut towers and the radiator support as well as where the windscreen meets the firewall areas.

Check for pinched or crushed chassis rails where the car has been improperly jacked or hoisted, rust can gather there too.

While you’re looking underneath, some sellers are painting the entire underside of the car black. This is generally done to hide damage and rust and is never a good sign. Our advice in this situation is to run away.

There are quite a few reports of missing parts especially on the more recently imported models. Think fuse box cover, oil cap, rad cap, any carbon fibre bits, or parts like that.

The headlights and taillights are known to build up condensation inside the lens’ quite easily, this is usually down to cracks or splits in the housing.

This may seem obvious but have the car inspected for crash damage and dodgy repairs. Many GT-R’s have had trips into the scenery so check if the paint is all original.

Also on the paint, after 20 years, sometimes the paint has seen better days, and some cars are resprayed purely to fix the faded paint, but with how collectible the R34 is, any paint job needs to be of a premium standard.

 

Interior:

There are reports of random electrical problems. Some owners have complained of the gauges being faulty or the warning lights malfunctioning and certain buttons or switches failing. This can sometimes be down to problems related to the wiring harness.

The dashboard or door inserts and trim can fade if it they have seen some extra attention from the sun.

With how well-bolstered the seats are, the outer bolster can cop some serious wear and tear and become overly squidgy.

There can be a tiny flex between the centre screen and the module that controls it. This is becoming common so best to check that the screen is fully operational and has no lines across or up or down.

There are unfortunately a few reports of odometers being doctored or rolled back by swapping gauge clusters, it is critical to make sure any example you’re looking at features the vehicles original odometer cluster.

With sometimes overly firm suspension, rattles and squeaks can quickly form, generally within the dash. Finding the troublesome rattle or noise can be a nightmare to find and fix.

 

Mechanical:

When heavily modified and poorly tuned, you can expect everything from Turbo failures, camshaft issues, valve guides falling out, oil starvation, oil pumps breaking into pieces, cylinder blocks just spontaneously breaking in half, clutch issues, differential failure, the list just goes on and on.

However, in standard road-going form, the R34 GT-R is bloody reliable. The R34 was built when Nissan’s reliability was at its absolute peak, resulting in (when maintained correctly) still superb reliability.

Although it’s important to remember, these are 20-year-old cars now so issues can still arise.

Everything made of rubber will be getting a bit soft and or brittle. Things like vacuum lines, brake, and fuel lines, all the coolant hoses, and critically the timing belt.

Given the current value of the R34, it is hard to imagine that any examples are being neglected and many of them probably aren’t even being driven, but time still takes its toll on all of these components even when not being used. 

Other things to be mindful of are the ATTESA & HICAS systems. ATTESA (Advanced Total Traction Engineering System) is the hydraulically actuated all-wheel-drive torque biasing system and it is somewhat complicated. The pumps can play up, there’s solenoids and electronics that can occasionally be problematic. 

The HICAS (High Capacity Actively Controlled Steering) also has hydraulics and a host of complicated components. In some cases, owners install a delete kit instead of repairing it and some say the cars are better for it. 

Another thing that goes wrong and probably the saddest is failures from terrible modifications and bad tunes.

You can usually see the terrible modifications and poor workmanship but a bad engine tune, well you might not know about that until it’s too late. 

For example, an extra boost without fuel system upgrades is just a recipe for disaster. That extra boost might have been sustainable 15 years ago when the fuel pump, regulator, and injectors were all relatively new, but if they’re not ok now and the engine leans out for too long, it is going to kill it.

It is imperative that if you are seriously looking to buy a Nissan Skyline R34 GT-R (even with minor mods), you MUST have it inspected by a reputable specialist before you take the plunge. 

Should you buy it?

If you’re seriously in the financial position that buying an R34 GT-R is an option, find the right example and take the plunge.

The R34 GT-R isn’t just a car, it’s an iconic piece of motoring history that offers not only incredible levels of performance, but also genuine practicality and more street credibility than you’ll know what to do with.

Plus well cared for and stock examples are immensely reliable and the right example may very well be a sound investment.

We don’t deny that for the current asking prices you could buy any number of modern exotic supercars but with the ever increasing numbers of said exotica on our roads, cars wearing premium badges are all started to become quite passe.

Within the majority of populated cities and on any given sunny weekend you may see any number of various Ferrari’s and Lamborghinis and chances are you’ll lose  count of the amount of Porsches, but an R34 GT-R offers another dimension of exclusivity.

Plus, when compared to many exotic performance cars, many of which now require very large race circuits to experience their physics bending abilities, the arguably more visceral and analogue GT-R provides potentially more driving engagement and potentially fun, more of the time.

This iconic performance car in standard form is certainly not faster than many oil the exotics, but if you prioritise driving enjoyment over stroking your ego, for half a million dollars, the Nissan Skyline R34 GT-R is the car to get.

If you’re seriously in the financial position that buying an R34 GT-R is an option, find the right example and take the plunge.

The R34 GT-R isn’t just a car, it’s an iconic piece of motoring history that offers not only incredible levels of performance, but also genuine practicality and more street credibility than you’ll know what to do with.

Plus well cared for and stock examples are immensely reliable and the right example may very well be a sound investment.

We don’t deny that for the current asking prices you could buy any number of modern exotic supercars but with the ever increasing numbers of said exotica on our roads, cars wearing premium badges are all started to become quite passe.

Within the majority of populated cities and on any given sunny weekend you may see any number of various Ferrari’s and Lamborghinis and chances are you’ll lose  count of the amount of Porsches, but an R34 GT-R offers another dimension of exclusivity.

Plus, when compared to many exotic performance cars, many of which now require very large race circuits to experience their physics bending abilities, the arguably more visceral and analogue GT-R provides potentially more driving engagement and potentially fun, more of the time.

This iconic performance car in standard form is certainly not faster than many oil the exotics, but if you prioritise driving enjoyment over stroking your ego, for half a million dollars, the Nissan Skyline R34 GT-R is the car to get.

Should you buy it?

If you’re seriously in the financial position that buying an R34 GT-R is an option, find the right example and take the plunge.

The R34 GT-R isn’t just a car, it’s an iconic piece of motoring history that offers not only incredible levels of performance, but also genuine practicality and more street credibility than you’ll know what to do with.

Plus well cared for and stock examples are immensely reliable and the right example may very well be a sound investment.

We don’t deny that for the current asking prices you could buy any number of modern exotic supercars but with the ever increasing numbers of said exotica on our roads, cars wearing premium badges are all started to become quite passe.

Within the majority of populated cities and on any given sunny weekend you may see any number of various Ferrari’s and Lamborghinis and chances are you’ll lose  count of the amount of Porsches, but an R34 GT-R offers another dimension of exclusivity.

Plus, when compared to many exotic performance cars, many of which now require very large race circuits to experience their physics bending abilities, the arguably more visceral and analogue GT-R provides potentially more driving engagement and potentially fun, more of the time.

This iconic performance car in standard form is certainly not faster than many oil the exotics, but if you prioritise driving enjoyment over stroking your ego, for half a million dollars, the Nissan Skyline R34 GT-R is the car to get.

Need help with finance?

What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

Per week*

8.49%

Comparison rate p.a#

Models, pricing & features

Nissan GT-R R34-2

GT-R

Price when new: $51,000 - $65,000

Price used: $150,000 - $250,000

Standard Features:

18-inch alloy wheels
Body coloured side mirrors
Front spoiler
Side skirts
Rear spoiler
Hydraulic steering system
Sports suspension
BREMBO brakes
Limited slip differential
Anti-roll bar
Quad exhaust
Driver and front passenger airbags
3-point (lap sash) seatbelt for all occupants
Seat pretensioners and load limiters for for driver and front passenger
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Rear vision mirror
Electric side mirrors
Electric windows – front only with auto up/down function for all windows
Headlights with low and high beam
Engine immobiliser
Tachometer
Fuel gauge
Manual handbrake
Power steering
Steering wheel – tilt (up/down) adjust
Leather steering wheel
Leather gear knob and handbrake
Manual air conditioning
Sports seats
5.8-inch multi-function dashboard LCD
4-speaker sound system
AM/FM radio
CD player

V-Spec

Price when new: $68,000 - $75,000

Price used: $200,000 - $550,000

In addition to GT-R:

Firmer suspension
Front and side splitters
Carbon-fibre rear diffuser
Carbon-fibre intercooler intake
Carbon-fibre exhaust temperature sensors

V-Spec II

Price when new: $73,000 -$81,000

Price used: $280,000 - $600,000

In addition to GT-R:

Stiffer suspension (compared to the V-Spec)
300mm rear disc brakes
Carbon-fibre bonnet
Iridium centre console
Aluminium pedals

M-Spec

Price when new: $71,000 - $82,000

Price used: $250,000 - $550,000

In addition to GT-R:

Ripple control dampers
Revised suspension setup
Stiffer rear sway bar
Leather upholstery
Heated front seats

V-Spec II Nür

Price when new: $90,000 - $110,000

Price used: $300,000 - $600,000

In addition to V-Spec II:

N1 engine – larger turbochargers
Increased boost pressure and ceramic blades

M-Spec Nür

Price when new: $90,000 - $110,000

Price used: $300,000 - $650,000

In addition to M-Spec:

N1 engine – larger turbochargers
Increased boost pressure and ceramic blades

Tech specs

Body Style:

2-door coupé

Engines:

2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Power:

206kW – 2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Torque:

392Nm – 2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed manual, all-wheel drive (AWD)

Fuel Consumption:

12.2L / 100km

Length:

4600mm

Width:

1785mm

Height:

1360mm

Kerb Weight:

1560kg

Body Style:

2-door coupé

Engines:

2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Power:

206kW – 2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Torque:

392Nm – 2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed manual, all-wheel drive (AWD)

Fuel Consumption:

12.2L / 100km

Length:

4600mm

Width:

1785mm

Height:

1360mm

Kerb Weight:

1560kg

Body Style:

2-door coupé

Engines:

2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Power:

206kW – 2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Torque:

392Nm – 2.6 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed manual, all-wheel drive (AWD)

Fuel Consumption:

12.2L / 100km

Length:

4600mm

Width:

1785mm

Height:

1360mm

Kerb Weight:

1560kg

Warranty & servicing

Warranty:

3 years/100,000km

Servicing:

10,000 km / 6 months

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Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of July 7, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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