Pros

  • Class-leading levels of ride, road-holding and driving experience
  • Barra 6-cyl has become an iconic engine for a reason
  • Excellent practicality
  • Robust construction and showing good signs of wear and tear

Cons

  • Diesel engine models can become reliability nightmares
  • Long lists of common faults
  • Many on the used market have seen far better days
  • Petrol 6 does love a drink, especially when driven hard

We desperately want to say yes because as Australians we should be bloody proud of the Ford Territory.

It was designed, engineered, developed and built here in Australia and when new, ended up being genuinely one of the best SUVs in the world, especially when it comes to driving.

However,...

Publish: January 6, 2023

Firstly, if you are not sure of what a Ford Territory even is, think of what the BMW X5 SUV is to the 5 Series, that is in a way, what the Territory is to Australia’s iconic Ford Falcon.

In fact, the Territory initially shared its engine, transmission and rear suspension with the BA Series Ford Falcon although the SUV has a unique front suspension setup and a completely different underbody structure.

The Territory was available for 12 years from 2004 to 2016 and in that time, much changed.

Over this period the Territory has had the ability to seat 5 or 7 depending on the year and trim spec, and has been available across primarily three iterations, the 2004 to 2005 SX, the 2005 to 2011 SY and the 2011 to 2016 SZ.

While all generations of Territory look very similar short of a subtle visual update here and there, under the skin, there’s more than meets the eye.

Initially powered by a naturally aspirated version of the iconic 4.0-litre straight six Barra engine, the SX, and SX Series 2 were available across three trim specs, the TX, TS and Ghia, all with a choice of rear or permanent four-wheel-drive.

The SY introduced a couple of limited trim specs but most notably, two Turbocharged four-wheel-drive variants, the Turbo and Turbo Ghia.

Plus, the crazy kids over at Ford Performance Vehicles or FPV got their hands on the Territory and created the bonkers F6X but that deserves its very own

Firstly, if you are not sure of what a Ford Territory even is, think of what the BMW X5 SUV is to the 5 Series, that is in a way, what the Territory is to Australia’s iconic Ford Falcon.

In fact, the Territory initially shared its engine, transmission and rear suspension with the BA Series Ford Falcon although the SUV has a unique front suspension setup and a completely different underbody structure.

The Territory was available for 12 years from 2004 to 2016 and in that time, much changed.

Over this period the Territory has had the ability to seat 5 or 7 depending on the year and trim spec, and has been available across primarily three iterations, the 2004 to 2005 SX, the 2005 to 2011 SY and the 2011 to 2016 SZ.

While all generations of Territory look very similar short of a subtle visual update here and there, under the skin, there’s more than meets the eye.

Initially powered by a naturally aspirated version of the iconic 4.0-litre straight six Barra engine, the SX, and SX Series 2 were available across three trim specs, the TX, TS and Ghia, all with a choice of rear or permanent four-wheel-drive.

The SY introduced a couple of limited trim specs but most notably, two Turbocharged four-wheel-drive variants, the Turbo and Turbo Ghia.

Plus, the crazy kids over at Ford Performance Vehicles or FPV got their hands on the Territory and created the bonkers F6X but that deserves its very own cheat sheet.

These turbocharged Territory’s feature the same Barra turbo engine that is now something of a holy grail to those hunting insane power figures.

Finally this the SZ (and to a lesser extent SZ Series 2), not only featured the most substantial visual and equipment changes to the Territory but introduced a rear or all-wheel-drive 2.7-litre turbo-diesel V6 to the range, but unfortunately at the cost of dropping the Barra Turbo models,

Also it should be noted, the diesels all-wheel-drive system is completely different to the previous four-wheel-drive setups.

Also the petrol powered 4.0-litre 6 became a rear drive only option and the SZ, and SZ series 2, also shook up the trim, equipment and mechanical packages a little with the Ghia becoming the Titanium.

Firstly, if you are not sure of what a Ford Territory even is, think of what the BMW X5 SUV is to the 5 Series, that is in a way, what the Territory is to Australia’s iconic Ford Falcon.

In fact, the Territory initially shared its engine, transmission and rear suspension with the BA Series Ford Falcon although the SUV has a unique front suspension setup and a completely different underbody structure.

The Territory was available for 12 years from 2004 to 2016 and in that time, much changed.

Over this period the Territory has had the ability to seat 5 or 7 depending on the year and trim spec, and has been available across primarily three iterations, the 2004 to 2005 SX, the 2005 to 2011 SY and the 2011 to 2016 SZ.

While all generations of Territory look very similar short of a subtle visual update here and there, under the skin, there’s more than meets the eye.

Initially powered by a naturally aspirated version of the iconic 4.0-litre straight six Barra engine, the SX, and SX Series 2 were available across three trim specs, the TX, TS and Ghia, all with a choice of rear or permanent four-wheel-drive.

The SY introduced a couple of limited trim specs but most notably, two Turbocharged four-wheel-drive variants, the Turbo and Turbo Ghia.

Plus, the crazy kids over at Ford Performance Vehicles or FPV got their hands on the Territory and created the bonkers F6X but that deserves its very own cheat sheet.

These turbocharged Territory’s feature the same Barra turbo engine that is now something of a holy grail to those hunting insane power figures.

Finally this the SZ (and to a lesser extent SZ Series 2), not only featured the most substantial visual and equipment changes to the Territory but introduced a rear or all-wheel-drive 2.7-litre turbo-diesel V6 to the range, but unfortunately at the cost of dropping the Barra Turbo models,

Also it should be noted, the diesels all-wheel-drive system is completely different to the previous four-wheel-drive setups.

Also the petrol powered 4.0-litre 6 became a rear drive only option and the SZ, and SZ series 2, also shook up the trim, equipment and mechanical packages a little with the Ghia becoming the Titanium.

With the exterior, there are reports that the door lock actuators are beginning to fail.

The plastic clips that hold the regulator for the electric windows can break, meaning the windows fail to work, you’ll still be able to see in and out, they just won’t go up and down.

On early models, the rubber seals around the tailgate can trap moisture resulting in dreaded rust issues.

Inside, malfunctioning body computers can spontaneously turn on the interior/reading lights and drain the battery.

The window switches themselves can have issues and stop working and so can the door locks. In fact some drivers found that they couldn’t unlock their doors to get out of their cars.

There are some cases of low battery voltage making the gear shift indicators flash, putting the car in “limp home” mode, this just means that the battery needs replacing.

Also, we found a few different reports stating that the Air Conditioning and heating on the SZ (or third gen) Territory can have a range of different issues so, if you’re checking one out, just make sure the air con and heating works on every setting. Also, if it sounds broken, it probably is.

Also, the Territory has unfortunately received quite a few recalls so make sure they’ve been seen to.

Mechanically, we’ve got a lot to get through here.

While the Territory has been available in Australia with a 2.7-litre V6 turbo diesel, or a straight 6 petrol, normally aspirated or turbo, we’re going to

With the exterior, there are reports that the door lock actuators are beginning to fail.

The plastic clips that hold the regulator for the electric windows can break, meaning the windows fail to work, you’ll still be able to see in and out, they just won’t go up and down.

On early models, the rubber seals around the tailgate can trap moisture resulting in dreaded rust issues.

Inside, malfunctioning body computers can spontaneously turn on the interior/reading lights and drain the battery.

The window switches themselves can have issues and stop working and so can the door locks. In fact some drivers found that they couldn’t unlock their doors to get out of their cars.

There are some cases of low battery voltage making the gear shift indicators flash, putting the car in “limp home” mode, this just means that the battery needs replacing.

Also, we found a few different reports stating that the Air Conditioning and heating on the SZ (or third gen) Territory can have a range of different issues so, if you’re checking one out, just make sure the air con and heating works on every setting. Also, if it sounds broken, it probably is.

Also, the Territory has unfortunately received quite a few recalls so make sure they’ve been seen to.

Mechanically, we’ve got a lot to get through here.

While the Territory has been available in Australia with a 2.7-litre V6 turbo diesel, or a straight 6 petrol, normally aspirated or turbo, we’re going to leave the petrol turbo for its very own cheat sheet.

Starting with the V6 diesel first, this engine is the same as found in a variety of Jaguars, Land Rovers, Range Rovers and even Citroens, which may be a red flag immediately.

Overall this diesel engines reliability is average.

They are known for having expensive high pressure fuel pump, turbo & EGR complications, the inlet manifolds are known to split, oil cooler leaks, water pump & thermostat housing leaks, they have a timing belt (not a chain) and a high-pressure fuel pump belt that both absolutely must be changed on time at 165,000kms.

Then there are plenty of reports of the belts breaking and the tensioners failing and it’s not pretty or cheap. However, the normally aspirated petrol (affectionately known as the Barra) is a different story. This engine is much more reliable and a popular choice for engine swaps and performance applications.

Occasionally we see leaking inlet manifold gaskets or a leaking water pump and they sometimes have auxiliary drive belt and tensioner issues too but overall, a well serviced unit shouldn’t actually give you much trouble.

The ZF 6-speed auto, this family of 6 speed ZF transmissions are overall fairly reliable (if serviced properly) but they can be let down by everything on the outside that supports it.

Things like transmission oil coolers, transmission position switches and selector cables are all common problems. In the all or four-wheel drive versions the transfer case is usually ok but further down the driveline there can be all sorts of nightmares.

Tail shaft centre bearings are a common problem and after replacement, there can be imbalance complications if not performed correctly.

The next in line are front and rear diff bushes and then all the suspension bushes and ball joints that often wear out. In the earlier models, it’s not uncommon for one of these to need a couple of thousand dollars worth of bushes and ball joints to be roadworthy.

It should be noted that even when these bushes and suspension components are at their worst, the vehicle itself may seem to drive near perfectly.

Hence why it is absolutely imperative to have a pre-purchase inspection carried out BEFORE you buy.

With the exterior, there are reports that the door lock actuators are beginning to fail.

The plastic clips that hold the regulator for the electric windows can break, meaning the windows fail to work, you’ll still be able to see in and out, they just won’t go up and down.

On early models, the rubber seals around the tailgate can trap moisture resulting in dreaded rust issues.

Inside, malfunctioning body computers can spontaneously turn on the interior/reading lights and drain the battery.

The window switches themselves can have issues and stop working and so can the door locks. In fact some drivers found that they couldn’t unlock their doors to get out of their cars.

There are some cases of low battery voltage making the gear shift indicators flash, putting the car in “limp home” mode, this just means that the battery needs replacing.

Also, we found a few different reports stating that the Air Conditioning and heating on the SZ (or third gen) Territory can have a range of different issues so, if you’re checking one out, just make sure the air con and heating works on every setting. Also, if it sounds broken, it probably is.

Also, the Territory has unfortunately received quite a few recalls so make sure they’ve been seen to.

Mechanically, we’ve got a lot to get through here.

While the Territory has been available in Australia with a 2.7-litre V6 turbo diesel, or a straight 6 petrol, normally aspirated or turbo, we’re going to leave the petrol turbo for its very own cheat sheet.

Starting with the V6 diesel first, this engine is the same as found in a variety of Jaguars, Land Rovers, Range Rovers and even Citroens, which may be a red flag immediately.

Overall this diesel engines reliability is average.

They are known for having expensive high pressure fuel pump, turbo & EGR complications, the inlet manifolds are known to split, oil cooler leaks, water pump & thermostat housing leaks, they have a timing belt (not a chain) and a high-pressure fuel pump belt that both absolutely must be changed on time at 165,000kms.

Then there are plenty of reports of the belts breaking and the tensioners failing and it’s not pretty or cheap. However, the normally aspirated petrol (affectionately known as the Barra) is a different story. This engine is much more reliable and a popular choice for engine swaps and performance applications.

Occasionally we see leaking inlet manifold gaskets or a leaking water pump and they sometimes have auxiliary drive belt and tensioner issues too but overall, a well serviced unit shouldn’t actually give you much trouble.

The ZF 6-speed auto, this family of 6 speed ZF transmissions are overall fairly reliable (if serviced properly) but they can be let down by everything on the outside that supports it.

Things like transmission oil coolers, transmission position switches and selector cables are all common problems. In the all or four-wheel drive versions the transfer case is usually ok but further down the driveline there can be all sorts of nightmares.

Tail shaft centre bearings are a common problem and after replacement, there can be imbalance complications if not performed correctly.

The next in line are front and rear diff bushes and then all the suspension bushes and ball joints that often wear out. In the earlier models, it’s not uncommon for one of these to need a couple of thousand dollars worth of bushes and ball joints to be roadworthy.

It should be noted that even when these bushes and suspension components are at their worst, the vehicle itself may seem to drive near perfectly.

Hence why it is absolutely imperative to have a pre-purchase inspection carried out BEFORE you buy.

Body style:

5-door SUV

Engines:

2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia, Titanium)
4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo, F6X) – 2006-09 (SY)

Power:

140kW – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)
182kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
190kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia, SR, SR2) – From 2005 (SY)
195kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
245KW – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo)
270kW – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (F6X)

Torque:

440Nm – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)
380Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
383Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia, SR, SR2) – From 2005 (SY)
391Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
480Nm – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo)
550Nm – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (F6X)

Transmission & drivetrains:

4-speed automatic, rear wheel drive (RWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia)
4-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
6-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia)
6-speed automatic, rear wheel drive (RWD) – 4.0 litre

Body style:

5-door SUV

Engines:

2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia, Titanium)
4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo, F6X) – 2006-09 (SY)

Power:

140kW – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)
182kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
190kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia, SR, SR2) – From 2005 (SY)
195kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
245KW – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo)
270kW – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (F6X)

Torque:

440Nm – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)
380Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
383Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia, SR, SR2) – From 2005 (SY)
391Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
480Nm – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo)
550Nm – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (F6X)

Transmission & drivetrains:

4-speed automatic, rear wheel drive (RWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia)
4-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
6-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia)
6-speed automatic, rear wheel drive (RWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Titanium)
6-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo, F6X)
6-speed automatic, rear wheel drive (RWD) – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)
6-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)

Fuel consumption:

12.2 – 14.9L/100km

Length:

4856mm

Width:

1898mm

Height:

1714mm

Kerb weight:

1995 – 2095kg

Towing (braked/unbraked):

2300kg / 750kg

Body style:

5-door SUV

Engines:

2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia, Titanium)
4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo, F6X) – 2006-09 (SY)

Power:

140kW – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)
182kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
190kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia, SR, SR2) – From 2005 (SY)
195kW – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
245KW – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo)
270kW – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (F6X)

Torque:

440Nm – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)
380Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
383Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia, SR, SR2) – From 2005 (SY)
391Nm – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Titanium) – From 2011 (SZ)
480Nm – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo)
550Nm – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (F6X)

Transmission & drivetrains:

4-speed automatic, rear wheel drive (RWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia)
4-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Ghia)
6-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, SR, SR2, Limited Edition, TS, Ghia)
6-speed automatic, rear wheel drive (RWD) – 4.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (TX, TS, Titanium)
6-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 4.0 litre turbocharged 6-cylinder petrol (Turbo, Ghia Turbo, F6X)
6-speed automatic, rear wheel drive (RWD) – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)
6-speed automatic, all wheel drive (AWD) – 2.7 litre turbocharged V6 diesel (TX, TS, Titanium)

Fuel consumption:

12.2 – 14.9L/100km

Length:

4856mm

Width:

1898mm

Height:

1714mm

Kerb weight:

1995 – 2095kg

Towing (braked/unbraked):

2300kg / 750kg

Warranty:

3 year/100,000kms

Servicing:

12-months/15,000kms

Model range, pricing & features

TX

Price when new: $36,990 - $48,240

Price used: $3,500 - $35,000

The TX is the base version of the Territory, available in rear-wheel drive or all-wheel drive with a six cylinder engine.

From 2011, the TX was also available with a 2.7-litre V6 turbo-diesel.

Standard Features:

17-inch steel wheels
4-star ANCAP safety rating (tested 2006)
Driver and front passenger airbags
3-point (lap sash) seatbelt for all occupants
Height adjustable seatbelts for driver and front passenger
Seat pretensioners for for driver and front passenger
Child seat anchor points
Headrests for driver and front passenger
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD)
Traction control
Rear vision mirror
Electric side mirrors
Electric windows – front and rear with driver’s auto up/down function
Projector headlights
Intermittent wipers
Rear wiper
Remote central locking
Engine immobiliser
Tachometer
Fuel gauge
Electrically adjustable pedals
Manual handbrake
Power steering
Multi-functional sterring wheel
Manual air conditioning
Cloth upholstery
4-Way electrically adjustable driver’s seat
Manual lumbar support adjustment for driver
4-speaker sound system
AM/FM radio
CD player
12V power outlet
Centre console storage
Glovebox
60:40 rear folding seats

2005 (SY) update:

Automatic headlights
Cup holders (front and rear)
Reading lamps (front and rear)

2007 (SY) update:

Electronic stability program (ESP)
Rear parking sensors

2009 (SY Mk II) update:

17-inch alloy wheels
Body coloured bumpers
Body-coloured door handles and mirrors
Full-length curtain airbags
Leather wrapped steering wheel
Leather wrapped gearshift selector
Cruise control

2011 (SZ) update:

17-inch alloy wheels
Electric steering (EPAS)
Self-adjusting park brake
Driver’s knee airbag
Rollover mitigation
Hill decent control
Single-zone climate control air conditioning
5.8-inch monochromatic screen with Interior Command Centre
Bluetooth connectivity
MP3 connectivity
USB connectivity

2014 (SZ Mk.II) update:

Front and rear parking sensors
Reversing camera with guidelines
SYNC2 infotainment system
8.0-inch infotainment system
SYNC2 Emergency assistance
Digital DAB+ radio
Voice control
Wi-Fi hotspot

April 2015 update:

Satellite navigation

SR

Price when new: $36,990 - $45,490

Price used: $3,500 - $20,000

Introduced in February 2006, the limited edition SR added alloy wheels, running boards, cruise control, leather-wrapped steering wheel and gearshift selector.

Additional Features:

17-inch alloy wheels
Ford iDesign running boards
Cruise control
Leather wrapped steering wheel
Leather wrapped gearshift selector

SR2

Price when new: $36,990 - $42,990

Price used: $4,000 - $21,000

The SR2 limited edition model was introduced in October 2008 adding 17-inch alloy wheels, cruise control, leather wrapped steering wheel and gearshift selector; as well as an Alphie DVD player with remote control and wireless headphones.

Additional Features:

17-inch alloy wheels
Cruise control
Leather wrapped steering wheel
Leather wrapped gearshift selector
Alpine DVD player with 10.2-inch rear screen
DVD remote control
Wireless headphones

TX Limited Edition

Price when new: $41,990 - $49,990

Price used: $11,000 - $18,000

The TX Limited Edition was introduced in July 2012. Compared to the TX model, the limited edition added 18-inch alloy wheels, unique colour accents, “Limited Edition” badging, side steps, third row seats and floor seats.

Additional Features:

18-inch alloy wheels
Unique colour accents
“Limited Edition” badging
Side steps
Third row seats
Floor mats

Turbo

Price when new: $53,990

Price used: $7,500 - $15,500

The Turbo was based on the TX model but added 18-inch alloy wheels, diamond pattern mesh grille, twin exhausts, sports multi-functional steering wheel and black suede-style upholstery.

Additional Features:

18-inch alloy wheels
Diamond pattern mesh grille
Twin exhausts
Sports multi-functional steering wheel
Black suede-style upholstery

TS

Price when new: $41,740 - $55,990

Price used: $3,000 - $30,000

The TS was the next model up in the Territory range and added a variety of features like alloy wheels, cruise control, 7-speaker system and dual zone climate control.

Additional Features:

17-inch alloy wheels
Front curtain airbags
Electronic stability program (ESP)
Hill descent control (HDC) – AWD models
Cruise control
Dual-zone climate control
Interior Command System with Colour TFT screen
7-speaker sound system
6-disc in-dash CD player
Load area cargo shelf

2005 (SY) update:

Automatic headlights
Cup holders (front and rear)
Reading lamps (front and rear)
Premium 100-watt audio system

2007 (SY) update:

Electronic stability program (ESP)
Rear parking sensors

2009 (SY Mk II) update:

Front fog lamps
Reversing camera
Leather-wrapped steering wheel
Leather-wrapped gear shifter and handbrake

2011 (SZ) update:

18-inch alloy wheels
Front fog lights
8.0-inch colour touch screen with Premium Interior Command Centre

2014 (SZ Mk.II) update:

Rear privacy glass
Cloth upholstery with leather-bolsters
150-watt amplifier

TS Limited Edition

Price when new: $41,990 - $46,990

Price used: $9,500 - $15,000

In October 2010, the TS Limited Edition was released and added partial leather upholstery, bluetooth connectivity, side steps and roof bars.

Additional Features:

Partial leather upholstery
Bluetooth connectivity
Side steps
Roof bars

Ghia

Price when new: $49,490 - $57,890

Price used: $4.000 - $18,000

The top-of-the-range Ghia added body coloured bumpers, body coloured side mirrors, rear parking sensors, automatic headlights, front fog lights and a variety of comfort features such as leather upholstery and memory function. The Ghia was replaced by the Titanium model with the SZ series.

Additional Features:

Body coloured bumpers
Partial body coloured side mirrors
Rear parking sensors
Automatic headlights
Front fog lights
Front and rear door courtesy lamps
Electrochromatic rear vision mirror
Leather wrapped multi-functional steering wheel
Leather wrapped gear shift
Leather upholstery
6-way electrically adjustable driver’s seat
Memory function – driver’s seat
Manualy adjustable front passengers lumbar support
Vanity mirror for driver and front passenger – illuminated
Cargo net

2005 (SY) update:

Reversing camera
Cup holders (front and rear)

2009 (SY Mk II) update:

Integrated side indicators into side mirrors
Alpine DVD player with 10.2-inch rear screen
DVD remote control
Wireless headphones

Ghia Turbo

Price when new: $65,490 - $66,820

Price used: $7,000 - $29,000

The Ghia Turbo is based on the Ghia but adds twin exhausts and a sports steering wheel.

Additional Features:

18-inch alloy wheels
Diamond pattern mesh grille
Twin exhausts
Sports multi-functional steering wheel

2007 (SY) update:

Electrochromatic rear vision mirror
Memory function – driver’s seat

2009 (SY Mk II) update:

Alpine DVD player with 10.2-inch rear screen
DVD remote control
Wireless headphones

Titanium

Price when new: $48,490 - $63,240

Price used: $10,500 - $37,000

The Titanium model was introduced with the SZ series of Territory range and replaced the Ghia model as the top-of-the-range.

Additional Features:

18-inch alloy wheels
Unique bumper
Chrome grille
Leather upholstery
6-way electrically adjustable driver’s seat
Memory function – driver’s seat
Front LED lamps
Satellite navigation with traffic alerts
Alpine DVD player with 10.2-inch rear screen
DVD remote control
Wireless headphones

2014 (SZ Mk.II) update:

Rear privacy glass
150-watt amplifier

FPV F6X

Price when new: $77,190

Price used: $37,000 - $55,000

The F6X was based on the Territory, adding a turbocharged six-cylinder engine as well as unique FPV mechanical enhancements like FPV springs, dampers, larger Brembo brakes, FPV badging and front sports seats.

Additional Features:

Unique FPV oil cooler
FPV springs and dampers
High-performance 6-speed automatic transmission
Larger Brembo brakes
18-inch “Alpine Silver” alloy wheels
FPV badging
F6X build number badge with unique identifier
FPV sports instrument cluster
Front sports seats
Two-toned leather upholstery
FPV floor mats

We desperately want to say yes because as Australians we should be bloody proud of the Ford Territory.

It was designed, engineered, developed and built here in Australia and when new, ended up being genuinely one of the best SUVs in the world, especially when it comes to driving.

However, taking off the rose coloured glasses and focusing on used examples, unfortunately these days, thanks to careless previous owners, many Territories have seen far better days.

Plus, at the time these were being produced, Ford didn’t exactly represent the epitome of mechanical excellence and if not maintained and serviced fastidiously, early Territory’s often feature a long list of problems and issues.

The good news is these dramas can be averted by sticking with later models, especially the Series 1 SZ’s and while finding a good one may require some serious hunting to find, they are out there.

We desperately want to say yes because as Australians we should be bloody proud of the Ford Territory.

It was designed, engineered, developed and built here in Australia and when new, ended up being genuinely one of the best SUVs in the world, especially when it comes to driving.

However, taking off the rose coloured glasses and focusing on used examples, unfortunately these days, thanks to careless previous owners, many Territories have seen far better days.

Plus, at the time these were being produced, Ford didn’t exactly represent the epitome of mechanical excellence and if not maintained and serviced fastidiously, early Territory’s often feature a long list of problems and issues.

The good news is these dramas can be averted by sticking with later models, especially the Series 1 SZ’s and while finding a good one may require some serious hunting to find, they are out there.

We desperately want to say yes because as Australians we should be bloody proud of the Ford Territory.

It was designed, engineered, developed and built here in Australia and when new, ended up being genuinely one of the best SUVs in the world, especially when it comes to driving.

However, taking off the rose coloured glasses and focusing on used examples, unfortunately these days, thanks to careless previous owners, many Territories have seen far better days.

Plus, at the time these were being produced, Ford didn’t exactly represent the epitome of mechanical excellence and if not maintained and serviced fastidiously, early Territory’s often feature a long list of problems and issues.

The good news is these dramas can be averted by sticking with later models, especially the Series 1 SZ’s and while finding a good one may require some serious hunting to find, they are out there.

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Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of January 06, 2022.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

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