Pros

  • Mind altering acceleration
  • Beautiful minimalist interior design
  • Near silent cabin
  • Immense levels of tech and safety

Cons

  • Build quality can vary enormously
  • Expensive repair costs
  • Touch screen and interface is intuitive but can be frustrating
  • Range anxiety for those on long trips

Despite the long list of quality issues and possibly very annoying idiosyncrasies the Model 3 clearly has, it’s still a very enjoyable car.

The simple fact is, EV’s are the future and the Model 3 has arguably set the standard for every other manufacturer to follow.

If you just need...

Publish: December 23, 2022

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last few years, you’ll most likely know that the Model 3 is the smaller and more affordable of Tesla’s actual cars (The Model S being the larger car and Model X and Y representing the SUV loosely category).

Technically the Model 3 has been available since 2017 however here in Australia, we had to wait until 2019 which may have been a good thing as early Model 3’s apparently suffered from quite a few issues in terms of quality, however more on that shortly.

In terms of variants, although all Model 3s look incredibly similar, here in Australia the range is split across three. The rear wheel drive Standard Range Plus, the dual motor all-wheel drive Long Range and dual motor all-wheel drive Performance.

While that three tier line-up may seem very simple, thanks to the regularity that Tesla updates their vehicles, the intricacies and specific specifications can vary depending on when and where the Model 3 you’re looking at was made.

We’re not just talking about what features each trim spec may include but even to the point that within that trim spec, the levels of range and performance, what brand of battery, what variant of motors and so much more have altered constantly.

Unlike the majority of manufactures that generally update a specific model of car for each new year model, Tesla have subtly altered and updated the Model 3 all the way through its lifecycle.

Therefore it’s not

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last few years, you’ll most likely know that the Model 3 is the smaller and more affordable of Tesla’s actual cars (The Model S being the larger car and Model X and Y representing the SUV loosely category).

Technically the Model 3 has been available since 2017 however here in Australia, we had to wait until 2019 which may have been a good thing as early Model 3’s apparently suffered from quite a few issues in terms of quality, however more on that shortly.

In terms of variants, although all Model 3s look incredibly similar, here in Australia the range is split across three. The rear wheel drive Standard Range Plus, the dual motor all-wheel drive Long Range and dual motor all-wheel drive Performance.

While that three tier line-up may seem very simple, thanks to the regularity that Tesla updates their vehicles, the intricacies and specific specifications can vary depending on when and where the Model 3 you’re looking at was made.

We’re not just talking about what features each trim spec may include but even to the point that within that trim spec, the levels of range and performance, what brand of battery, what variant of motors and so much more have altered constantly.

Unlike the majority of manufactures that generally update a specific model of car for each new year model, Tesla have subtly altered and updated the Model 3 all the way through its lifecycle.

Therefore it’s not as critical to focus on buying, say a 2020 Model 3, instead, check what features you require and then if the Model 3 you’re looking at has those features.

However, the Model 3 has received quite a significant update for the 2021 model year. We’re talking a number of substantial technical changes plus notable improvements to the car’s trim and features.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last few years, you’ll most likely know that the Model 3 is the smaller and more affordable of Tesla’s actual cars (The Model S being the larger car and Model X and Y representing the SUV loosely category).

Technically the Model 3 has been available since 2017 however here in Australia, we had to wait until 2019 which may have been a good thing as early Model 3’s apparently suffered from quite a few issues in terms of quality, however more on that shortly.

In terms of variants, although all Model 3s look incredibly similar, here in Australia the range is split across three. The rear wheel drive Standard Range Plus, the dual motor all-wheel drive Long Range and dual motor all-wheel drive Performance.

While that three tier line-up may seem very simple, thanks to the regularity that Tesla updates their vehicles, the intricacies and specific specifications can vary depending on when and where the Model 3 you’re looking at was made.

We’re not just talking about what features each trim spec may include but even to the point that within that trim spec, the levels of range and performance, what brand of battery, what variant of motors and so much more have altered constantly.

Unlike the majority of manufactures that generally update a specific model of car for each new year model, Tesla have subtly altered and updated the Model 3 all the way through its lifecycle.

Therefore it’s not as critical to focus on buying, say a 2020 Model 3, instead, check what features you require and then if the Model 3 you’re looking at has those features.

However, the Model 3 has received quite a significant update for the 2021 model year. We’re talking a number of substantial technical changes plus notable improvements to the car’s trim and features.

The most common complaint is just appalling build quality with major panel gap inconsistencies and certain panels not lining up at all.

However, this is apparently improving over time and according to many Tesla experts out there, the Chinese made Model 3’s are a massive improvement over the American produced examples.

In terms of exterior issues, firstly, rust. This is very much a location based issue, we don’t see much of it here in Australia but roads covered in salt can cause some serious corrosion.

The problem is actually so serious that in 2019 Tesla issued a warning to rinse away road salt from the underside, wheel wells and brakes to prevent corrosion.

There are loads of reports of paint runs, over sprays, fading and flaking all being on the common side and even to the point where some people that have had their cars wrapped, when the wrap is removed, it can peel the paint off with it, obviously requiring a full and very expensive respray.

Condensation can build in the rear lights on early models requiring the entire rear light assembly to be replaced

It is critical to take a good look at the glass roof. If it is scratched or cracked it will need to be replaced and that is extremely expensive. Also, if you’re shopping for a Model 3, make sure the roof is washed as dirt and grime can cover up some tell tale signs.

Make sure to check the windows for any scratches as

The most common complaint is just appalling build quality with major panel gap inconsistencies and certain panels not lining up at all.

However, this is apparently improving over time and according to many Tesla experts out there, the Chinese made Model 3’s are a massive improvement over the American produced examples.

In terms of exterior issues, firstly, rust. This is very much a location based issue, we don’t see much of it here in Australia but roads covered in salt can cause some serious corrosion.

The problem is actually so serious that in 2019 Tesla issued a warning to rinse away road salt from the underside, wheel wells and brakes to prevent corrosion.

There are loads of reports of paint runs, over sprays, fading and flaking all being on the common side and even to the point where some people that have had their cars wrapped, when the wrap is removed, it can peel the paint off with it, obviously requiring a full and very expensive respray.

Condensation can build in the rear lights on early models requiring the entire rear light assembly to be replaced

It is critical to take a good look at the glass roof. If it is scratched or cracked it will need to be replaced and that is extremely expensive. Also, if you’re shopping for a Model 3, make sure the roof is washed as dirt and grime can cover up some tell tale signs.

Make sure to check the windows for any scratches as dirt and sand can make its way into the mechanism and cause damage.

On some early models, there were issues with the under tray. Everything from the tray basically disintegrating when it became wet through to the tray collecting kilos of rocks and dirt and road grime. This should have been sorted but be sure to check that the undertray is the improved version.

There are multiple reports of the door handles failing to work, both inside and out.

Unfortunately (and this might be exclusive to Australia), thanks to a lack of certified repairers, especially outside capital cities, the Model 3 is proving to be quite expensive to repair. Some repairers are honest with the prices they charge although we came across far too many stories of some repairers charging ridiculous amounts for the smallest of bodywork issues.

Inside, like the exterior, the interior can also suffer from a vast array of quality control issues and especially on early models.

We’re talking about missing or broken trim pieces, missing bolts, weird squeaks and rattles, unfortunately the list of reported interior issues goes on and on and seems to be ever increasing as the Model 3 ages.

There are also reports that the screen can begin to drop or miss pixels or yellow around the edges.

Be sure to check what version of hardware (in terms of the computer system) the Model 3 has. Newer models with the latest hardware have more processing capabilities but in the same way an old mobile phone can become slow and clunky with new software updates, the same can happen for the car. It’s not a major issue yet and the hardware can be upgraded however this will come at a cost.

Be sure to check every function works like the air conditioning, cameras, infotainment systems, the drive modes. On a test drive, this will take time but it is critical to check as there are plenty of reports of certain functions failing.

In terms of overall mechanical or electronic reliability, the Model 3 is simply very reliable.

In fact, the percentage of vehicles that have experienced catastrophic motor, driveline or battery failure is less than 5 percent and considering (in Australia) all the model 3’s are still under warranty it’s not something you need to worry about, yet.

Long term, the motors & drivelines just have way fewer moving parts and there is just less to go wrong.

With the batteries, Teslas have a very efficient liquid cooling system to manage battery heat (unlike a Nissan Leaf with air cooling) so even in a hot climate they should be ok.

Another comparison to the Nissan leaf, unlike the Leaf the Model 3 doesn’t have a quick and easy way of checking battery health (specifically the current % of charge or the actual condition of the battery). The Model 3 has drawn out process where you have to be plugged in and go into service mode and takes hours to do a self-assessment. Not something you’ll need to worry about now, but in the future when they are 10 years old and out of battery warranty, it could make it difficult to know what you’re getting.

In terms of servicing, they still have tyres and suspension components that wear like everything else, wipers, cabin filters, the brakes wear less thanks to regenerative braking but overall much cheaper and less often than conventional cars.

Fun fact, apart from the main high voltage battery, they also have a regular small 12V battery just like everything else that’ll need changing every 3 or 4 years.

The most common complaint is just appalling build quality with major panel gap inconsistencies and certain panels not lining up at all.

However, this is apparently improving over time and according to many Tesla experts out there, the Chinese made Model 3’s are a massive improvement over the American produced examples.

In terms of exterior issues, firstly, rust. This is very much a location based issue, we don’t see much of it here in Australia but roads covered in salt can cause some serious corrosion.

The problem is actually so serious that in 2019 Tesla issued a warning to rinse away road salt from the underside, wheel wells and brakes to prevent corrosion.

There are loads of reports of paint runs, over sprays, fading and flaking all being on the common side and even to the point where some people that have had their cars wrapped, when the wrap is removed, it can peel the paint off with it, obviously requiring a full and very expensive respray.

Condensation can build in the rear lights on early models requiring the entire rear light assembly to be replaced

It is critical to take a good look at the glass roof. If it is scratched or cracked it will need to be replaced and that is extremely expensive. Also, if you’re shopping for a Model 3, make sure the roof is washed as dirt and grime can cover up some tell tale signs.

Make sure to check the windows for any scratches as dirt and sand can make its way into the mechanism and cause damage.

On some early models, there were issues with the under tray. Everything from the tray basically disintegrating when it became wet through to the tray collecting kilos of rocks and dirt and road grime. This should have been sorted but be sure to check that the undertray is the improved version.

There are multiple reports of the door handles failing to work, both inside and out.

Unfortunately (and this might be exclusive to Australia), thanks to a lack of certified repairers, especially outside capital cities, the Model 3 is proving to be quite expensive to repair. Some repairers are honest with the prices they charge although we came across far too many stories of some repairers charging ridiculous amounts for the smallest of bodywork issues.

Inside, like the exterior, the interior can also suffer from a vast array of quality control issues and especially on early models.

We’re talking about missing or broken trim pieces, missing bolts, weird squeaks and rattles, unfortunately the list of reported interior issues goes on and on and seems to be ever increasing as the Model 3 ages.

There are also reports that the screen can begin to drop or miss pixels or yellow around the edges.

Be sure to check what version of hardware (in terms of the computer system) the Model 3 has. Newer models with the latest hardware have more processing capabilities but in the same way an old mobile phone can become slow and clunky with new software updates, the same can happen for the car. It’s not a major issue yet and the hardware can be upgraded however this will come at a cost.

Be sure to check every function works like the air conditioning, cameras, infotainment systems, the drive modes. On a test drive, this will take time but it is critical to check as there are plenty of reports of certain functions failing.

In terms of overall mechanical or electronic reliability, the Model 3 is simply very reliable.

In fact, the percentage of vehicles that have experienced catastrophic motor, driveline or battery failure is less than 5 percent and considering (in Australia) all the model 3’s are still under warranty it’s not something you need to worry about, yet.

Long term, the motors & drivelines just have way fewer moving parts and there is just less to go wrong.

With the batteries, Teslas have a very efficient liquid cooling system to manage battery heat (unlike a Nissan Leaf with air cooling) so even in a hot climate they should be ok.

Another comparison to the Nissan leaf, unlike the Leaf the Model 3 doesn’t have a quick and easy way of checking battery health (specifically the current % of charge or the actual condition of the battery). The Model 3 has drawn out process where you have to be plugged in and go into service mode and takes hours to do a self-assessment. Not something you’ll need to worry about now, but in the future when they are 10 years old and out of battery warranty, it could make it difficult to know what you’re getting.

In terms of servicing, they still have tyres and suspension components that wear like everything else, wipers, cabin filters, the brakes wear less thanks to regenerative braking but overall much cheaper and less often than conventional cars.

Fun fact, apart from the main high voltage battery, they also have a regular small 12V battery just like everything else that’ll need changing every 3 or 4 years.

Body style:
4-door sedan

Electric motors:

  • Single electric motor with a 54kWh battery pack (Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive)
  • Dual electric motor with a 79.5kWh battery pack (Long Range AWD and Performance AWD)

Power:

  • 211kW – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 147kW (front motor) & 188kW (rear motor) – Long Range AWD
  • 147kW (front motor) & 211kW (rear motor) – Performance AWD

Torque:

  • 450Nm – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 510Nm – Long Range AWD
  • 639Nm – Performance AWD

Transmission & drivetrains:

  • 1-speed gearbox, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 1-speed gearbox, all-wheel drive (AWD) – Long Range AWD and Performance AWD

Range:

  • 470km range (Standard Range Plus RWD)
  • 490km range (Standard Range Plus RWD) – From October 2020
  • 556km range (Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive) – From November 2021
  • 620km range (Long Range AWD)
  • 657km range (Long Range AWD) – From October 2020
  • 694km range (Long Range AWD) – From November 2021
  • 681km range (Long Range AWD) – From January 2022
  • 595km range (Performance AWD)
  • 628km range (Performance AWD) – From October 2020

Length:
4694mm

Width:
1849mm

Height:
1443mm

Kerb weight:
1611 – 1847kg

Body style:
4-door sedan

Electric motors:

  • Single electric motor with a 54kWh battery pack (Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive)
  • Dual electric motor with a 79.5kWh battery pack (Long Range AWD and Performance AWD)

Power:

  • 211kW – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 147kW (front motor) & 188kW (rear motor) – Long Range AWD
  • 147kW (front motor) & 211kW (rear motor) – Performance AWD

Torque:

  • 450Nm – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 510Nm – Long Range AWD
  • 639Nm – Performance AWD

Transmission & drivetrains:

  • 1-speed gearbox, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 1-speed gearbox, all-wheel drive (AWD) – Long Range AWD and Performance AWD

Range:

  • 470km range (Standard Range Plus RWD)
  • 490km range (Standard Range Plus RWD) – From October 2020
  • 556km range (Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive) – From November 2021
  • 620km range (Long Range AWD)
  • 657km range (Long Range AWD) – From October 2020
  • 694km range (Long Range AWD) – From November 2021
  • 681km range (Long Range AWD) – From January 2022
  • 595km range (Performance AWD)
  • 628km range (Performance AWD) – From October 2020

Length:
4694mm

Width:
1849mm

Height:
1443mm

Kerb weight:
1611 – 1847kg

Body style:
4-door sedan

Electric motors:

  • Single electric motor with a 54kWh battery pack (Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive)
  • Dual electric motor with a 79.5kWh battery pack (Long Range AWD and Performance AWD)

Power:

  • 211kW – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 147kW (front motor) & 188kW (rear motor) – Long Range AWD
  • 147kW (front motor) & 211kW (rear motor) – Performance AWD

Torque:

  • 450Nm – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 510Nm – Long Range AWD
  • 639Nm – Performance AWD

Transmission & drivetrains:

  • 1-speed gearbox, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • 1-speed gearbox, all-wheel drive (AWD) – Long Range AWD and Performance AWD

Range:

  • 470km range (Standard Range Plus RWD)
  • 490km range (Standard Range Plus RWD) – From October 2020
  • 556km range (Standard Range Plus RWD, Rear-Wheel Drive) – From November 2021
  • 620km range (Long Range AWD)
  • 657km range (Long Range AWD) – From October 2020
  • 694km range (Long Range AWD) – From November 2021
  • 681km range (Long Range AWD) – From January 2022
  • 595km range (Performance AWD)
  • 628km range (Performance AWD) – From October 2020

Length:
4694mm

Width:
1849mm

Height:
1443mm

Kerb weight:
1611 – 1847kg

Warranty:

4 years/80,000kms

Servicing:

No regular service intervals – service is required only when the car indicates it requires it

Model range, pricing & features

Standard Range Plus RWD / Rear-Wheel Drive RWD

Price when new: $59,900 - $73,900

Price used: $48,000 - $100,000

The Standard Range Plus RWD / Rear-Wheel Drive model is the base model on the Model 3, comprising of a single electric motor attached to the rear-wheels with a 54kWh battery pack.

The Standard Range Plus RWD provides 470km of range, which was upgraded to 490km (from October 2020), and with the rear-wheel drive model replacing the Standard Range Plus RWD providing more range at 556km.

Standard features:

  • 18-inch alloy wheels
  • Body coloured bumper bars
  • Body coloured side mirrors
  • Tinted glass roof
  • Stop/start system
  • Electric sterring system
  • Regenerative braking system
  • 5-star ANCAP safety rating (tested 2019)
  • Driver and front passenger airbags
  • Front side airbags
  • Full-length curtain airbags
  • 3-point (lap sash) seatbelt for all occupants
  • Height adjustable seatbelts for driver and front passenger
  • Seat pretensioners and load limiters for for driver and front passenger
  • ISOFIX points for rear outboard seats
  • Child seat anchor points
  • Seatbelt reminder for all seats
  • Headrests for all occupants
  • Active head restraints for driver and front passenger
  • Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
  • Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD)
  • Brake assist
  • Electronic stability program (ESP)
  • Traction control
  • Hill start assist (HSA)
  • Autonomous emergency braking (AEB) – low, high speed and pedestrian
  • Blind spot monitoring (BSM)
  • Lane keeping assist
  • Front and rear parking sensors
  • Reversing camera with grid lines
  • 360 degree camera
  • Electrochromatic rear vision mirror
  • Heated side mirrors
  • Electrically folding side mirrors
  • Electric windows – front and rear with auto up/down function for all windows
  • LED headlights
  • Automatic headlights
  • Auto high-beam (also known as high beam assist)
  • Rain sensing (auto) wipers
  • Remote central locking with keyless entry (via button on door handle)
  • Push button start
  • Engine immobiliser
  • Proximity alarm
  • Speed sensitive door locking
  • Trip computer
  • Electromechnical handbrake
  • Handbrake auto hold function
  • Memory functions (side mirrors, seat memory, infotainment preferences)
  • Steering wheel – tilt (up/down) and telescopic (reach) adjust
  • Leather steering wheel
  • Dual-zone climate control
  • Rear air vents
  • Alcantara interior trim
  • Leather-like upholstery
  • 12-Way electrically adjustable driver and front passenger’s seat
  • Electric lumbar support adjustment for driver and front passenger
  • Driver’s seat memory function
  • Front passenger’s seat memory function
  • Seat heating: driver and front passenger
  • 15-inch touchscreen infotainment system
  • DAB+ digital radio
  • Bluetooth connectivity – phone and audio streaming
  • Satellite navigation
  • Internet connectivity
  • AUX input
  • Wireless charging
  • Front USB inputs
  • Rear USB inputs
  • Front and rear cup holders
  • Centre console storage
  • Glovebox
  • Front seat map pockets
  • Sunglasses holder
  • Vanity mirror for driver and front passenger
  • 60:40 rear folding seats
  • Luggage/load divider

Long Drive AWD

Price when new: $73,200 - $92,069

Price used: $61,000 - $105,000

The Long Range AWD features a dual electric motor with a 79.5kWh good for an estimated 620km of range, which was upgraded to 657km in October 2020, 694km from November 2021 and then downrated to 681km on models produced from January 2022.

The Long-Range also has additional luxury features such as a premium audio system, live traffic updates, heated rear seats and interior floor mats. 2021 updates also added 19-inch alloys and LED fog lights.

Additional features:

  • Heated rear seats
  • Premium audio system
  • Live traffic updates
  • In-car music/media streaming (through infotainment system)
  • Interior floor mats

2021 updates:

  • 19-inch alloy wheels
  • LED fog lights

Performance AWD

Price when new: $86,472 - $102,469

Price used: $75,000 - $115,000

The Performance AWD is the most powerful version of the Model 3 coupled with the same dual motor setup as the Long-Range AWD. It features more power delivered to the rear motor/wheels.

In addition to more power, the Performance AWD also gains 20-inch alloy wheels, performance brakes, a carbon fibre rear spoiler, lowered/sportier suspension and track mode. 2022 models also gained metal finished pedals.

The Performance AWD is good for a range of 595km, which was upgraded to an estimated 628km of range from October 2020.

Additional features:

  • 20-inch alloy wheels
  • Performance brakes
  • Carbon fibre rear spoiler
  • Lowered/sportier suspension
  • Track mode

2022 updates:

  • Metal finished pedals

Despite the long list of quality issues and possibly very annoying idiosyncrasies the Model 3 clearly has, it’s still a very enjoyable car.

The simple fact is, EV’s are the future and the Model 3 has arguably set the standard for every other manufacturer to follow.

If you just need an EV right now, and you’re happy to ignore the potential problems, and you’ve found an example that is as close to perfect as you can get, yes, buy one, it’s such an impressive thing, most of the time.

However, we worry with how incredibly impressive the equivalently priced EVs are from the likes of Hyundai, Kia, Polestar and Genesis, the Model 3’s lofty position in the market might be coming to an end, and with other manufacturers easily matching if not outdoing Tesla for tech, features and ownership experience, the question is, is buying a used Model 3 becoming similar to buying an old laptop?

Sure an older Model 3 will still work and do pretty much everything you need it to do, but now that cars are becoming as much a piece of personal technology as they are a form of transport, the shiny new things coming from all of the other manufactures may quickly make the Model 3 look and feel very old fashioned.

Finally, if you do buy one, can we ask a favour, don’t be a dick about it. Yes it’s a great car but you owning one doesn’t make you a better human than

Despite the long list of quality issues and possibly very annoying idiosyncrasies the Model 3 clearly has, it’s still a very enjoyable car.

The simple fact is, EV’s are the future and the Model 3 has arguably set the standard for every other manufacturer to follow.

If you just need an EV right now, and you’re happy to ignore the potential problems, and you’ve found an example that is as close to perfect as you can get, yes, buy one, it’s such an impressive thing, most of the time.

However, we worry with how incredibly impressive the equivalently priced EVs are from the likes of Hyundai, Kia, Polestar and Genesis, the Model 3’s lofty position in the market might be coming to an end, and with other manufacturers easily matching if not outdoing Tesla for tech, features and ownership experience, the question is, is buying a used Model 3 becoming similar to buying an old laptop?

Sure an older Model 3 will still work and do pretty much everything you need it to do, but now that cars are becoming as much a piece of personal technology as they are a form of transport, the shiny new things coming from all of the other manufactures may quickly make the Model 3 look and feel very old fashioned.

Finally, if you do buy one, can we ask a favour, don’t be a dick about it. Yes it’s a great car but you owning one doesn’t make you a better human than the rest of us.

Despite the long list of quality issues and possibly very annoying idiosyncrasies the Model 3 clearly has, it’s still a very enjoyable car.

The simple fact is, EV’s are the future and the Model 3 has arguably set the standard for every other manufacturer to follow.

If you just need an EV right now, and you’re happy to ignore the potential problems, and you’ve found an example that is as close to perfect as you can get, yes, buy one, it’s such an impressive thing, most of the time.

However, we worry with how incredibly impressive the equivalently priced EVs are from the likes of Hyundai, Kia, Polestar and Genesis, the Model 3’s lofty position in the market might be coming to an end, and with other manufacturers easily matching if not outdoing Tesla for tech, features and ownership experience, the question is, is buying a used Model 3 becoming similar to buying an old laptop?

Sure an older Model 3 will still work and do pretty much everything you need it to do, but now that cars are becoming as much a piece of personal technology as they are a form of transport, the shiny new things coming from all of the other manufactures may quickly make the Model 3 look and feel very old fashioned.

Finally, if you do buy one, can we ask a favour, don’t be a dick about it. Yes it’s a great car but you owning one doesn’t make you a better human than the rest of us.

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Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of December 23, 2022.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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