Likes

  • All the charm and image you could ever want.
  • Superb driving experience.
  • Fantastic owners community.
  • Later models showing good reliability.

Dislikes

  • Shocking turning circle.
  • Ergonomics are incredibly challenging.
  • Lacks real practicality.
  • Can feel like a cheap econobox, until you drive it.

Stuff you should know

Navigating the Abarth range can be a bit perplexing, so let’s break down the essence of the Abarth 500, 595, and 695 along with their siblings.

Fundamentally, the Abarth lineup is an upgraded version of the Fiat 500, a popular budget-friendly city car in Italy. Interestingly, these Abarths are not manufactured in Italy but rather originate from Poland.

Introduced in Australia in 2011, the Abarth models are still considered current, and depending on the year and trim, they are available as either a hardtop hatchback or a soft-top convertible.

It’s crucial to note that Fiat and Abarth have continually updated and improved the entire range, organizing them into different series.

When it comes to the models, things can become a bit intricate. Abarth offers three primary flavors: the 500, 595, and 695, all equipped with variations of the same turbocharged 1.4-liter engine. Generally, as you move up the model hierarchy, the power output increases.

Transmission options vary depending on the model, including a 5-speed manual, a 5-speed automated manual, an automatic, or, for those prioritizing lap times and possessing the financial means, a Competizione transmission.

The trim specifications can be intricate, but in Australia, the Abarth 500 comes in two flavors: the Abarth 500 and Abarth 500 Esseesse. The 595 has five versions: the 595, 50th Anniversary, Competizione, Scorpioneoro, and the Turismo. The 695 is available in six versions: the 70 Anniversario, Biposto, Competizione, Edizione Maserati, Rivale, and Tributo Ferrari.

While there are even more international variants, it’s safe to say that, no matter how deeply you wish to immerse yourself in Italian charm and passion on four wheels, there should be an Abarth to suit your preferences.

Despite the allure of Abarth, it’s worth considering that Italian cars, especially performance variants, can have a less-than-stellar reputation for build quality and reliability. To determine if this holds true for Abarth, read on.

What goes wrong

Exterior:

Regrettably, as reported by numerous owners, the Abarth occasionally sheds parts of its alluring body kit. Fortunately, most owners notice the loose components before they detach, but it’s advisable to verify that all elements are securely attached.

Additionally, there are observations that the badges on the car can blister or detach, a situation more prevalent in hotter climates, such as Australia.

Soft-top convertibles have been known to develop leaks as the rubber seals and fabric roof age. If considering purchasing a convertible, it’s recommended to test it with water to ensure it remains watertight.

Abarths equipped with sunroofs have also been reported to experience leaks, and finding replacement parts for roof mechanisms in Australia is reportedly challenging.

The paint on certain models, particularly red and black ones, is susceptible to marking and chipping, with reports of fading if not properly cared for or garaged.

Graphics on the vehicle may peel off if the car has not been adequately maintained, and obtaining genuine OEM replacements can be costly.

Typical Fiat 500 issues, such as loose door handles or handles prone to self-destruction, are present. Door lock actuators and wiring may malfunction, causing issues with locking or unlocking the car.

The wiring flex point boot in the tailgate can split with age, requiring attention to prevent cable wear. Door mirrors are reportedly fragile, and non-Xenon headlights are criticized for poor performance.

Inconsistent build quality, ranging from perfect panel gaps to notable variances, is a recurring concern. Electronic malfunctions are common, affecting various components that rely on electricity.

Pre-facelift models may experience condensation inside lights, and earlier series cars might go through bulbs prematurely. Windscreen washer motors can fail, and jets may become clogged.

 

Interior:

Similar to the exterior, be cautious of random electronic issues that not only affect controls but can also drain the battery.

Check for signs of drink spillages near the USB port, as replacing a unit can be costly and inconvenient.

HVAC systems may encounter glitches, from control malfunctions to air-con blower failures. Replacing the blower involves labor-intensive removal of the entire dashboard, resulting in significant expenses.

Test all air con functions and be alert for squealing or odd noises, which could indicate potential problems.

Issues like a flashing aircon temp gauge may arise, attributed to vent motor faults requiring resetting by a dealer.

The boost gauge may not function in extremely cold weather, but a simple fix involves turning the car off and on again.

The airbag sensor may display a fault, but it can often be resolved by restarting the car.

Reports of odd build quality problems, including internal squeaks in the door cards and plastics rattling, are prevalent. It seems that Abarths exhibit varying

Exterior:

Regrettably, as reported by numerous owners, the Abarth occasionally sheds parts of its alluring body kit. Fortunately, most owners notice the loose components before they detach, but it’s advisable to verify that all elements are securely attached.

Additionally, there are observations that the badges on the car can blister or detach, a situation more prevalent in hotter climates, such as Australia.

Soft-top convertibles have been known to develop leaks as the rubber seals and fabric roof age. If considering purchasing a convertible, it’s recommended to test it with water to ensure it remains watertight.

Abarths equipped with sunroofs have also been reported to experience leaks, and finding replacement parts for roof mechanisms in Australia is reportedly challenging.

The paint on certain models, particularly red and black ones, is susceptible to marking and chipping, with reports of fading if not properly cared for or garaged.

Graphics on the vehicle may peel off if the car has not been adequately maintained, and obtaining genuine OEM replacements can be costly.

Typical Fiat 500 issues, such as loose door handles or handles prone to self-destruction, are present. Door lock actuators and wiring may malfunction, causing issues with locking or unlocking the car.

The wiring flex point boot in the tailgate can split with age, requiring attention to prevent cable wear. Door mirrors are reportedly fragile, and non-Xenon headlights are criticized for poor performance.

Inconsistent build quality, ranging from perfect panel gaps to notable variances, is a recurring concern. Electronic malfunctions are common, affecting various components that rely on electricity.

Pre-facelift models may experience condensation inside lights, and earlier series cars might go through bulbs prematurely. Windscreen washer motors can fail, and jets may become clogged.

 

Interior:

Similar to the exterior, be cautious of random electronic issues that not only affect controls but can also drain the battery.

Check for signs of drink spillages near the USB port, as replacing a unit can be costly and inconvenient.

HVAC systems may encounter glitches, from control malfunctions to air-con blower failures. Replacing the blower involves labor-intensive removal of the entire dashboard, resulting in significant expenses.

Test all air con functions and be alert for squealing or odd noises, which could indicate potential problems.

Issues like a flashing aircon temp gauge may arise, attributed to vent motor faults requiring resetting by a dealer.

The boost gauge may not function in extremely cold weather, but a simple fix involves turning the car off and on again.

The airbag sensor may display a fault, but it can often be resolved by restarting the car.

Reports of odd build quality problems, including internal squeaks in the door cards and plastics rattling, are prevalent. It seems that Abarths exhibit varying build quality, making it a bit of a gamble in terms of potential issues.

 

Mechanically:

Now it is said, that Italian sports cars have questionable reliability. But overall, these things are actually pretty good. The earlier ones were less reliable but newer models did improve.

Engine-wise, they’re actually pretty reliable. The most common issue is turbo failure which, in some cases, can be attributed to oil starvation from restricted oil supply lines. And in some cases that can be attributed to long service intervals. You really should be servicing it more frequently if you’re giving it the beans.

The timing belt recommendation is 120,000km or 5 years I’d say (to be safe) every 100,000/4 years, only because we’ve seen the water pump fail and take out the belt before it’s due.

The cooling system, aside from water pumps failing, the expansion tank and thermostat housing leaks are common too. But I wouldn’t say more common than any other Euro car.

The manual transmissions in these are okay but the clutch master cylinder pushrod tends to fail and the clutch slave cylinder is a weak point too. It’s a concentric slave cylinder too so that means taking the gearbox out.

The auto… well, automated manual, does have its fair share of issues. Not as bad as the internet would have you believe though.

They do occasionally have clutch and selector actuation issues and software glitches. Not really considered unreliable but definitely more unreliable and more expensive to fix than the manual.

Otherwise, the CV shafts are a bit flimsy and can be a weak point, especially if tuned. Plus, the rear wheel bearings often wear prematurely… especially with wider wheels.

Actually, just on the tuned and modified thing, these are a popular tuner platform, but this is where these do become unreliable. That said, all cars do become less reliable when modified, but these do tend to break if leaned on too hard. But with common sense and/or a healthy budget, you’ll be fine.

 

Recalls:

  • December 2021 – The compliance label on some Fiat Abarth 595 (2021, 32 units affected) may incorrectly state a seating capacity of five instead of four, potentially leading to non-compliance with Australian Design Rule 61/02 and the risk of transporting excess occupants.

Exterior:

Regrettably, as reported by numerous owners, the Abarth occasionally sheds parts of its alluring body kit. Fortunately, most owners notice the loose components before they detach, but it’s advisable to verify that all elements are securely attached.

Additionally, there are observations that the badges on the car can blister or detach, a situation more prevalent in hotter climates, such as Australia.

Soft-top convertibles have been known to develop leaks as the rubber seals and fabric roof age. If considering purchasing a convertible, it’s recommended to test it with water to ensure it remains watertight.

Abarths equipped with sunroofs have also been reported to experience leaks, and finding replacement parts for roof mechanisms in Australia is reportedly challenging.

The paint on certain models, particularly red and black ones, is susceptible to marking and chipping, with reports of fading if not properly cared for or garaged.

Graphics on the vehicle may peel off if the car has not been adequately maintained, and obtaining genuine OEM replacements can be costly.

Typical Fiat 500 issues, such as loose door handles or handles prone to self-destruction, are present. Door lock actuators and wiring may malfunction, causing issues with locking or unlocking the car.

The wiring flex point boot in the tailgate can split with age, requiring attention to prevent cable wear. Door mirrors are reportedly fragile, and non-Xenon headlights are criticized for poor performance.

Inconsistent build quality, ranging from perfect panel gaps to notable variances, is a recurring concern. Electronic malfunctions are common, affecting various components that rely on electricity.

Pre-facelift models may experience condensation inside lights, and earlier series cars might go through bulbs prematurely. Windscreen washer motors can fail, and jets may become clogged.

 

Interior:

Similar to the exterior, be cautious of random electronic issues that not only affect controls but can also drain the battery.

Check for signs of drink spillages near the USB port, as replacing a unit can be costly and inconvenient.

HVAC systems may encounter glitches, from control malfunctions to air-con blower failures. Replacing the blower involves labor-intensive removal of the entire dashboard, resulting in significant expenses.

Test all air con functions and be alert for squealing or odd noises, which could indicate potential problems.

Issues like a flashing aircon temp gauge may arise, attributed to vent motor faults requiring resetting by a dealer.

The boost gauge may not function in extremely cold weather, but a simple fix involves turning the car off and on again.

The airbag sensor may display a fault, but it can often be resolved by restarting the car.

Reports of odd build quality problems, including internal squeaks in the door cards and plastics rattling, are prevalent. It seems that Abarths exhibit varying build quality, making it a bit of a gamble in terms of potential issues.

 

Mechanically:

Now it is said, that Italian sports cars have questionable reliability. But overall, these things are actually pretty good. The earlier ones were less reliable but newer models did improve.

Engine-wise, they’re actually pretty reliable. The most common issue is turbo failure which, in some cases, can be attributed to oil starvation from restricted oil supply lines. And in some cases that can be attributed to long service intervals. You really should be servicing it more frequently if you’re giving it the beans.

The timing belt recommendation is 120,000km or 5 years I’d say (to be safe) every 100,000/4 years, only because we’ve seen the water pump fail and take out the belt before it’s due.

The cooling system, aside from water pumps failing, the expansion tank and thermostat housing leaks are common too. But I wouldn’t say more common than any other Euro car.

The manual transmissions in these are okay but the clutch master cylinder pushrod tends to fail and the clutch slave cylinder is a weak point too. It’s a concentric slave cylinder too so that means taking the gearbox out.

The auto… well, automated manual, does have its fair share of issues. Not as bad as the internet would have you believe though.

They do occasionally have clutch and selector actuation issues and software glitches. Not really considered unreliable but definitely more unreliable and more expensive to fix than the manual.

Otherwise, the CV shafts are a bit flimsy and can be a weak point, especially if tuned. Plus, the rear wheel bearings often wear prematurely… especially with wider wheels.

Actually, just on the tuned and modified thing, these are a popular tuner platform, but this is where these do become unreliable. That said, all cars do become less reliable when modified, but these do tend to break if leaned on too hard. But with common sense and/or a healthy budget, you’ll be fine.

 

Recalls:

  • December 2021 – The compliance label on some Fiat Abarth 595 (2021, 32 units affected) may incorrectly state a seating capacity of five instead of four, potentially leading to non-compliance with Australian Design Rule 61/02 and the risk of transporting excess occupants.

Should you buy it?

Well, it all hinges on your preferred style of relationships.

If you lean towards the safe, stable, and committed type of long-term relationship, where disagreements are resolved diplomatically, and passionate behaviour tends to be more on the vanilla side of spice, then the Abarth may not be the right choice for you.

On the other hand, if you fancy a spirited partner who prioritises passion and emotion over logic and responsibility, someone who may occasionally threaten to leave you and abscond with your wallet and the dog – but you find that sort of relationship thrilling because, when it’s good, it’s exceptionally good – then absolutely, go ahead and invest in an Abarth.

It’s a ridiculous car that makes very little sense but like plenty of Italian delicacies, no matter how bad it is for you, it just makes the world a better place.

Well, it all hinges on your preferred style of relationships.

If you lean towards the safe, stable, and committed type of long-term relationship, where disagreements are resolved diplomatically, and passionate behaviour tends to be more on the vanilla side of spice, then the Abarth may not be the right choice for you.

On the other hand, if you fancy a spirited partner who prioritises passion and emotion over logic and responsibility, someone who may occasionally threaten to leave you and abscond with your wallet and the dog – but you find that sort of relationship thrilling because, when it’s good, it’s exceptionally good – then absolutely, go ahead and invest in an Abarth.

It’s a ridiculous car that makes very little sense but like plenty of Italian delicacies, no matter how bad it is for you, it just makes the world a better place.

Should you buy it?

Well, it all hinges on your preferred style of relationships.

If you lean towards the safe, stable, and committed type of long-term relationship, where disagreements are resolved diplomatically, and passionate behaviour tends to be more on the vanilla side of spice, then the Abarth may not be the right choice for you.

On the other hand, if you fancy a spirited partner who prioritises passion and emotion over logic and responsibility, someone who may occasionally threaten to leave you and abscond with your wallet and the dog – but you find that sort of relationship thrilling because, when it’s good, it’s exceptionally good – then absolutely, go ahead and invest in an Abarth.

It’s a ridiculous car that makes very little sense but like plenty of Italian delicacies, no matter how bad it is for you, it just makes the world a better place.

Need help with finance?

What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

Per week*

8.49%

Comparison rate p.a#

Models, pricing & features

Abarth 595-1

50th Anniversary

Price when new: $45,000

Price used: $16,900 - $19,500

Equipment

  • 17″ Alloy Wheels
  • 6 Speaker Stereo
  • ABS (Antilock Brakes)
  • Active Torque Transfer System
  • Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt only
  • Air Cond. – Climate Control
  • Air Conditioning – Pollen Filter
  • Airbag – Driver
  • Airbag – Knee Driver
  • Airbag – Passenger
  • Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
  • Airbags – Head for 2nd Row Seats
  • Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
  • Amplifier – 1 Separate
  • Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
  • Audio – MP3 Decoder
  • Bluetooth System
  • Body Colour – Bumpers
  • Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Partial
  • Brake Assist
  • CD Player
  • Calipers – Painted Front
  • Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
  • Chrome Door Handles – Exterior
  • Chrome Door Handles – Interior
  • Chrome Exhaust Tip(s)
  • Control – Electronic Stability
  • Control – Park Distance Rear
  • Control – Traction
  • Decals
  • Diffuser – Rear
  • Disc Brakes Front Vented Drilled/Grooved
  • Disc Brakes Rear Vented Drilled/Grooved
  • EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
  • Engine Immobiliser
  • Exhaust System – Dual
  • Fog Lamps – Front
  • Gauge – Boost
  • Headlamps – Bi-Xenon (for low & high beam)
  • Headlamps – See me home
  • Hill Holder
  • Leather Gear Knob
  • Leather Seats – Two Tone
  • Multi-function Control Screen
  • Multi-function Steering Wheel
  • Pedals – Sports
  • Performance Brakes
  • Power Door Mirrors
  • Power Steering – Electric Assist
  • Power Windows – Front only
  • Premium Sound System
  • Rear View Mirror – Electric Anti Glare
  • Rear Wiper/Washer
  • Seat – Height Adjustable Driver
  • Seatbelt – Load Limiters 1st Row (Front)
  • Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
  • Seats – 2nd Row Split Fold
  • Side Skirts
  • Spare Wheel – Space Saver/Temporary
  • Spoiler – Rear Roof Mounted
  • Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
  • Steering Wheel – Sports
  • Subwoofer
  • Sunroof
  • Suspension – Lowered
  • Suspension – Sports
  • Trip Computer
  • Tyre Pressure Monitoring – with logging/display
  • Voice Recognition

Turismo

Price when new: $33,500

Price used: $15,200 - $17,500

Adds

  • Air Conditioning
  • Audio – Aux Input Socket (MP3/CD/Cassette)
  • Body Colour – Interior Inserts
  • Calipers – Painted Rear
  • Cargo Cover
  • Digital Instrument Display – Full
  • Disc Brakes Rear Solid
  • Driving Mode – Selectable
  • Exhaust – Stainless Steel Dual System
  • Floor Mats
  • Leather Steering Wheel
  • Leather Trim – Partial
  • Metallic Finish Fuel Filler Cap
  • Metallic Finish Gear Knob
  • Rear Windows – Extra Dark/Privacy
  • Scuff Plates (on door sills)
  • Sports Exhaust

Competizione

Price when new: $34,250 - $36,500

Price used: $16,000 - $31,700

Adds

  • Carbon Fibre – Scuff Plates
  • Matt Black – Exterior Highlights
  • Trim – Cloth

MY21 update

  • Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
  • Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)

595

Price when new: $27,500

Price used: $16,300 - $18,400

Adds

  • 16″ Alloy Wheels
  • Brake Emergency Display – Hazard/Stoplights
  • Central Locking
  • Coloured Door Mirrors
  • Control – Electronic Damper
  • Daytime Running Lamps
  • Decals – Stripes on body
  • Demister – Rear Windscreen with Timer
  • Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
  • Drive By Wire (Electronic Throttle Control)
  • Headlamps – Electric Level Adjustment
  • Painted – Wheels
  • Power Door Mirrors – Heated
  • Power Steering
  • Tyre Pressure Sensor

Scorpioneoro

Price when new: $30,950

Price used: $26,800 - $29,500

Adds

  • 7 Speaker Stereo
  • Cup Holders – 1st Row
  • Decals – Bonnet
  • Decals – Roof
  • Gloss Finish Inserts in Dash Board
  • Matt Black – Interior Highlights
  • Metallic Finish Door Handles – Interior
  • Smart Device App Display/Control
  • Smart Device Integration – Android Auto
  • Smart Device Integration – Apple CarPlay
  • Wheel Centre Cap with Logo

Tech specs

Body Styles

  • 3 door Hatchback
  • 2 door Convertible

Engine Specs

  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 132kW / 250Nm (50th Anniversary 2013 – 2014, Competizione 2016 – 2021)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 118kW / 230Nm (Turismo 2014 – 2016, Competizione 2014 – 2016)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 103kW / 206Nm (595 2016)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 107kW / 206Nm (595 2017 – 2021)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 121kW / 230Nm (Scorpioneoro 2021)

Transmission

  • 5-speed Manual (50th Anniversary, Turismo, Competizione, 595, Scorpioneoro)
  • 5-speed Sports Automatic Single Clutch (50th Anniversary, Turismo, Competizione, 595, Scorpioneoro)

Fuel Consumption

  • 5.4 – 8.4 / 100km (50th Anniversary)
  • 5.4 – 8.5 / 100km (Turismo)
  • 4.7 – 7.6 / 100km (Competizione, 595)

Length

  • 3657mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1627mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1485mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2300mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • Unknown kg – 1035kg (3 door Hatchback)
  • Unknown kg (2 door Convertible)

Towing

  • Unknown kg (unbraked) – 800kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Body Styles

  • 3 door Hatchback
  • 2 door Convertible

Engine Specs

  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 132kW / 250Nm (50th Anniversary 2013 – 2014, Competizione 2016 – 2021)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 118kW / 230Nm (Turismo 2014 – 2016, Competizione 2014 – 2016)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 103kW / 206Nm (595 2016)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 107kW / 206Nm (595 2017 – 2021)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 121kW / 230Nm (Scorpioneoro 2021)

Transmission

  • 5-speed Manual (50th Anniversary, Turismo, Competizione, 595, Scorpioneoro)
  • 5-speed Sports Automatic Single Clutch (50th Anniversary, Turismo, Competizione, 595, Scorpioneoro)

Fuel Consumption

  • 5.4 – 8.4 / 100km (50th Anniversary)
  • 5.4 – 8.5 / 100km (Turismo)
  • 4.7 – 7.6 / 100km (Competizione, 595)

Length

  • 3657mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1627mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1485mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2300mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • Unknown kg – 1035kg (3 door Hatchback)
  • Unknown kg (2 door Convertible)

Towing

  • Unknown kg (unbraked) – 800kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Body Styles

  • 3 door Hatchback
  • 2 door Convertible

Engine Specs

  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 132kW / 250Nm (50th Anniversary 2013 – 2014, Competizione 2016 – 2021)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 118kW / 230Nm (Turismo 2014 – 2016, Competizione 2014 – 2016)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 103kW / 206Nm (595 2016)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 107kW / 206Nm (595 2017 – 2021)
  • 1.4 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 121kW / 230Nm (Scorpioneoro 2021)

Transmission

  • 5-speed Manual (50th Anniversary, Turismo, Competizione, 595, Scorpioneoro)
  • 5-speed Sports Automatic Single Clutch (50th Anniversary, Turismo, Competizione, 595, Scorpioneoro)

Fuel Consumption

  • 5.4 – 8.4 / 100km (50th Anniversary)
  • 5.4 – 8.5 / 100km (Turismo)
  • 4.7 – 7.6 / 100km (Competizione, 595)

Length

  • 3657mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1627mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1485mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2300mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • Unknown kg – 1035kg (3 door Hatchback)
  • Unknown kg (2 door Convertible)

Towing

  • Unknown kg (unbraked) – 800kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Warranty & servicing

Warranty

  • 3 years / 150,000 km (All Models)

Servicing

  • 15,000 km / 12 months (All Models)

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Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of Dec 07, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

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