Likes

  • Loaded with tech, equipment and features
  • Incredibly safe
  • Wide range of variants to cater for nearly every desire
  • Showing excellent reliability, so far

Dislikes

  • Depending on when you buy it, depreciation can hit very hard
  • Ex-Police Highway Patrol cars will have most likely lived a very hard life
  • Sheer amount of technical features are almost overwhelming
  • Engines, driveline and equipment systems are incredibly complex

Stuff you should know

For seven generations, BMW’s 5 Series has built a reputation is the quintessential large luxury sedan. Like key nemesis Mercedes-Benz E-Class, there has been purple and not so colourful patches in the 5 Series linage and brand loyalists will forever debate which generation is good and which is better.

But if you want the newest, techy-est, most 7 Series-limousine-like experience, the latest version, currently still on sale in facelifted (aka LCI) guise, is your foil.

The latest 5 Series arrived in March 2016 and has been offered in Oz in sedan (G30) and wagon ‘Touring’ (G31) body styles. And while there’s a fairly logical structure to the complete ‘5er’ line-up offered to date, deciding on the right variant for you is large down to personal preferences sympathetic of your available budget. That’s because there are a lot of options and much to unpack.

The range launched with four turbocharged engines. Petrol choices were the 185kW/350Nm 2.0L-four 530i and 250kW/450Nm 3.0L-six 540i. The two diesel options were the 140kW/400 2.0L-four 520d and the 195kW/620Nm 3.0L-six 530d. All eight-speed autos and rear-drive.

Three months after its debut, a (2.0L) petrol-electric hybrid 530e was launched at around $109k, or the same price as the 530i. Initially, at least, the 5 Series range was bookended by the base 520d Luxury Line ($93k) and the tree-topping 540i that could be had in either Luxury Line or M Sport guises ($136k) for the same coin.

In July 2017, a cheapy 520i, with an under-baked 135kW/290Nm low-power 2.0L four, marked a new $90k entry point to the range. Here, the Touring wagons also lobbed, if limited to four-pot 530i and 520d power (from $100k) for the duration of the G31 lifecycle.

Whether you prefer the comfier Luxury Line or more spirited M Sport themes, they could be had up and down the range at different price points. Still, if you wanted fancy features either way, BMW charged extra and handsomely at that. Well-optioned examples are usually good used finds.

Outside of that, the regular 5 Series typical brims with tech, especially as standard on the pricier six-cylinder 540 badged stuff. Of course, the more you spent the more elaborate the spec and equipment. And come 2017 performance and pricing took big leap with the arrival of the M5.

The M5, a proper M-car, is such an animal apart it gets its own F90 model designation. With its hellacious 441kW and 750Nm bi-turbo 4.4L V8 and (switchable) all-wheel drive, the regular M5 Launch Edition ($200k) could dispatch 0-100km/h in 3.4sec. A more potent 460kW M5 Competition was also offered, dropping performance times and raising the entry price ($230-plus).

Something of a sweet spot in range was the 2020 arrival of the (G30) M550 xDrive. In either full-fat ($150k) or stripped-back Pure ($135k) guises, it was the missing link between mainline 5ers and the manic M-cars, fitting a different 390kW/750Nm turbo 4.4L V8 to the M5 if still offering wild, sub-four-second performance via all-paw traction.

The LCI facelift, in July 2020, brought minor styling changes and updates for the 2.0-litre petrol and diesel powertrains. Cabin also got a flashier and more elaborate multimedia system.
To date, the king of heap remains 2021’s “track-focused” 467kW M5 CS, with a 3.0sec 0-100km/h claim and a circa-$306k price tag.

The G30 remains on sale as of June 2022.

What goes wrong?

  • In terms of the exterior, there are reports that the sunroof seals can make a whistling sound or exhibit additional noise due to it apparently not being installed correctly.
  • In-terms of ex-Police patrol cars, make sure any accessories (Lights, bar work, aerials etc) have been removed correctly as chipped or scratched paint on metal panels can result in corrosion and eventually rust.
  • Some scratching and light damage, especially front and rear bars being slightly loose is to be expected with former Police cars also.
  • Inside, there are reports of rattles and squeaks forming around the centre console/armrest, door inserts/trim, under various seats in the car or the a-pillar.
  • There are also reports of the air conditioning fan speed changing by itself randomly, as well as not producing air that’s actually all that cold even when you’ve selected cold.
  • The Head Up Display is known to glitch or flicker and instruments are known to show information that isn’t always correct i.e: seat belt reminders when the seat in question is empty.
  • For ex-patrol cars, check for excessive wear on seat belts, seat bolsters, interior trim and excessive holes that once attached accessories.
  • Mechanically, the B48 and B58 petrol engines are commonly regarded as being quite reliable. So far none of the chronic waste gate rattles and injector failures seen in the likes of the N54 and N55 are commonly apparent.
  • Evidence so far suggests that in terms of oil leaks, cooling system complications and general reliability, the B48 and B58 are a considerable improvement over its predecessors however, we suspect cooling system issues, leaking valve covers, oil filter housings, and oil pan gaskets will be common B48 and B58 engine problems in the future. These are pretty common issues among almost all BMW’s.
  • The less common N63 twin-turbo V8 has something of a reputation for excess oil consumption, occasional timing chain failures, leaking valve stem seals and fast battery drainage issues.
  • In regards to the diesel engines, there are no commonly reported catastrophic failures. Although, typical for late model diesel engines there are reports of EGR and DPF complications.
  • In some cases, this can be attributed to extended condition based service intervals. We highly recommend owners service their 5 Series at least every 10,000kms or every 6 months especially if you plan on keeping the car for any length of time.
  • Occasionally on all variants the tail shaft flex coupling fails prematurely and there are a few problems with engine mounts but it should be noted, these are not common issues.
  • There are more common complaints related to software and technical gremlins which may not be a huge problem when the car is under warranty but if these issues continue
  • In terms of the exterior, there are reports that the sunroof seals can make a whistling sound or exhibit additional noise due to it apparently not being installed correctly.
  • In-terms of ex-Police patrol cars, make sure any accessories (Lights, bar work, aerials etc) have been removed correctly as chipped or scratched paint on metal panels can result in corrosion and eventually rust.
  • Some scratching and light damage, especially front and rear bars being slightly loose is to be expected with former Police cars also.
  • Inside, there are reports of rattles and squeaks forming around the centre console/armrest, door inserts/trim, under various seats in the car or the a-pillar.
  • There are also reports of the air conditioning fan speed changing by itself randomly, as well as not producing air that’s actually all that cold even when you’ve selected cold.
  • The Head Up Display is known to glitch or flicker and instruments are known to show information that isn’t always correct i.e: seat belt reminders when the seat in question is empty.
  • For ex-patrol cars, check for excessive wear on seat belts, seat bolsters, interior trim and excessive holes that once attached accessories.
  • Mechanically, the B48 and B58 petrol engines are commonly regarded as being quite reliable. So far none of the chronic waste gate rattles and injector failures seen in the likes of the N54 and N55 are commonly apparent.
  • Evidence so far suggests that in terms of oil leaks, cooling system complications and general reliability, the B48 and B58 are a considerable improvement over its predecessors however, we suspect cooling system issues, leaking valve covers, oil filter housings, and oil pan gaskets will be common B48 and B58 engine problems in the future. These are pretty common issues among almost all BMW’s.
  • The less common N63 twin-turbo V8 has something of a reputation for excess oil consumption, occasional timing chain failures, leaking valve stem seals and fast battery drainage issues.
  • In regards to the diesel engines, there are no commonly reported catastrophic failures. Although, typical for late model diesel engines there are reports of EGR and DPF complications.
  • In some cases, this can be attributed to extended condition based service intervals. We highly recommend owners service their 5 Series at least every 10,000kms or every 6 months especially if you plan on keeping the car for any length of time.
  • Occasionally on all variants the tail shaft flex coupling fails prematurely and there are a few problems with engine mounts but it should be noted, these are not common issues.
  • There are more common complaints related to software and technical gremlins which may not be a huge problem when the car is under warranty but if these issues continue post the warranty period, the repair bills may stack up.
  • We should also mention that all of the engine and driveline options are extremely complex. While yes at this age the 5 Series is very reliable, it is inevitable that as they age things will fail and they are going to be expensive to repair and maintain.
  • In-terms of the ex-police highway patrol cars, it’s important to know these cars are put through some of the most mechanically stressful conditions possible. Having a car sit by the side of the road, idling for hours at a time only to be driven aggressively at full throttle in sporadic bursts puts a huge strain on all mechanical components.
  • Plus, even though highway patrol cars are maintained fastidiously and often serviced far more regularly than what BMW suggests, they are driven with minimal mechanical sympathy and if not a Police vehicle, in a way that many would regard as abuse.
  • We should also note that there have been a few factory recalls for this generation so if you’re in the market for one, make sure they’ve been seen too
  • Also, it’s important to remember that as this generation of 5 Series is far more complex and technical than ever before, there is so much more that can go wrong in the long term and fixing these issues can become very expensive.
  • In terms of the exterior, there are reports that the sunroof seals can make a whistling sound or exhibit additional noise due to it apparently not being installed correctly.
  • In-terms of ex-Police patrol cars, make sure any accessories (Lights, bar work, aerials etc) have been removed correctly as chipped or scratched paint on metal panels can result in corrosion and eventually rust.
  • Some scratching and light damage, especially front and rear bars being slightly loose is to be expected with former Police cars also.
  • Inside, there are reports of rattles and squeaks forming around the centre console/armrest, door inserts/trim, under various seats in the car or the a-pillar.
  • There are also reports of the air conditioning fan speed changing by itself randomly, as well as not producing air that’s actually all that cold even when you’ve selected cold.
  • The Head Up Display is known to glitch or flicker and instruments are known to show information that isn’t always correct i.e: seat belt reminders when the seat in question is empty.
  • For ex-patrol cars, check for excessive wear on seat belts, seat bolsters, interior trim and excessive holes that once attached accessories.
  • Mechanically, the B48 and B58 petrol engines are commonly regarded as being quite reliable. So far none of the chronic waste gate rattles and injector failures seen in the likes of the N54 and N55 are commonly apparent.
  • Evidence so far suggests that in terms of oil leaks, cooling system complications and general reliability, the B48 and B58 are a considerable improvement over its predecessors however, we suspect cooling system issues, leaking valve covers, oil filter housings, and oil pan gaskets will be common B48 and B58 engine problems in the future. These are pretty common issues among almost all BMW’s.
  • The less common N63 twin-turbo V8 has something of a reputation for excess oil consumption, occasional timing chain failures, leaking valve stem seals and fast battery drainage issues.
  • In regards to the diesel engines, there are no commonly reported catastrophic failures. Although, typical for late model diesel engines there are reports of EGR and DPF complications.
  • In some cases, this can be attributed to extended condition based service intervals. We highly recommend owners service their 5 Series at least every 10,000kms or every 6 months especially if you plan on keeping the car for any length of time.
  • Occasionally on all variants the tail shaft flex coupling fails prematurely and there are a few problems with engine mounts but it should be noted, these are not common issues.
  • There are more common complaints related to software and technical gremlins which may not be a huge problem when the car is under warranty but if these issues continue post the warranty period, the repair bills may stack up.
  • We should also mention that all of the engine and driveline options are extremely complex. While yes at this age the 5 Series is very reliable, it is inevitable that as they age things will fail and they are going to be expensive to repair and maintain.
  • In-terms of the ex-police highway patrol cars, it’s important to know these cars are put through some of the most mechanically stressful conditions possible. Having a car sit by the side of the road, idling for hours at a time only to be driven aggressively at full throttle in sporadic bursts puts a huge strain on all mechanical components.
  • Plus, even though highway patrol cars are maintained fastidiously and often serviced far more regularly than what BMW suggests, they are driven with minimal mechanical sympathy and if not a Police vehicle, in a way that many would regard as abuse.
  • We should also note that there have been a few factory recalls for this generation so if you’re in the market for one, make sure they’ve been seen too
  • Also, it’s important to remember that as this generation of 5 Series is far more complex and technical than ever before, there is so much more that can go wrong in the long term and fixing these issues can become very expensive.

Should you buy it?

Buying this generation of 5 Series has less to do with the 5 Series and more to do with your net worth.

No matter what trim or model or spec, the 5 Series is a truly superb car. If you require a fuel efficient quiet and luxurious cruiser, there’s a 5 Series for you and if you want a car that will rearrange your perception of physics while injecting genuine fear into your passengers while you tear through corners at near impossible speeds, there is also a 5 Series for you.

And if you want all the warm and fuzzy’s that come with feeling like a highway patrol cop yet don’t want to put your life on the line every time you go to work, there are the ex- highway patrol cars.

But the problem is, as we’re already seeing with this generation and as we’ve seen from previous generations of 5 Series, they do have a habit of depreciating in value at near terrifying speeds and unless they’re maintained fastidiously they unfortunately don’t show great longevity.

Therefore while yes the 5 Series is a superb car, unless you have the financial means to deal with not only the depreciation and the maintenance required to keep these going, but you can easily afford to pay for what may be some scary repair bills in the future, no you should not buy a 5 Series.

Overall, if you have money to burn, sure buy a 5 Series they’re awesome, but if

Buying this generation of 5 Series has less to do with the 5 Series and more to do with your net worth.

No matter what trim or model or spec, the 5 Series is a truly superb car. If you require a fuel efficient quiet and luxurious cruiser, there’s a 5 Series for you and if you want a car that will rearrange your perception of physics while injecting genuine fear into your passengers while you tear through corners at near impossible speeds, there is also a 5 Series for you.

And if you want all the warm and fuzzy’s that come with feeling like a highway patrol cop yet don’t want to put your life on the line every time you go to work, there are the ex- highway patrol cars.

But the problem is, as we’re already seeing with this generation and as we’ve seen from previous generations of 5 Series, they do have a habit of depreciating in value at near terrifying speeds and unless they’re maintained fastidiously they unfortunately don’t show great longevity.

Therefore while yes the 5 Series is a superb car, unless you have the financial means to deal with not only the depreciation and the maintenance required to keep these going, but you can easily afford to pay for what may be some scary repair bills in the future, no you should not buy a 5 Series.

Overall, if you have money to burn, sure buy a 5 Series they’re awesome, but if you’re on a tight budget, sorry but no, it’s not worth the risk. A Lexus GS may be a safer bet.

In-terms of if you should buy an ex-Police highway patrol car, while you may save thousands of dollars, it can be nearly impossible to ascertain just how much use (or abuse) an ex-patrol car has been subjected to.

It’s honestly up to you if you want a car with a good service history, or a history of good service.

Should you buy it?

Buying this generation of 5 Series has less to do with the 5 Series and more to do with your net worth.

No matter what trim or model or spec, the 5 Series is a truly superb car. If you require a fuel efficient quiet and luxurious cruiser, there’s a 5 Series for you and if you want a car that will rearrange your perception of physics while injecting genuine fear into your passengers while you tear through corners at near impossible speeds, there is also a 5 Series for you.

And if you want all the warm and fuzzy’s that come with feeling like a highway patrol cop yet don’t want to put your life on the line every time you go to work, there are the ex- highway patrol cars.

But the problem is, as we’re already seeing with this generation and as we’ve seen from previous generations of 5 Series, they do have a habit of depreciating in value at near terrifying speeds and unless they’re maintained fastidiously they unfortunately don’t show great longevity.

Therefore while yes the 5 Series is a superb car, unless you have the financial means to deal with not only the depreciation and the maintenance required to keep these going, but you can easily afford to pay for what may be some scary repair bills in the future, no you should not buy a 5 Series.

Overall, if you have money to burn, sure buy a 5 Series they’re awesome, but if you’re on a tight budget, sorry but no, it’s not worth the risk. A Lexus GS may be a safer bet.

In-terms of if you should buy an ex-Police highway patrol car, while you may save thousands of dollars, it can be nearly impossible to ascertain just how much use (or abuse) an ex-patrol car has been subjected to.

It’s honestly up to you if you want a car with a good service history, or a history of good service.

Need help with finance?

What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

Per week*

8.49%

Comparison rate p.a#

Models, pricing & features

BMW 5 Series-1

520d Luxury Line

Price when new: $93,900

Price used: $43,400 - $47,700

Equipment

  • 12 Speaker Stereo
  • 12V Socket(s) – Auxiliary
  • 18″ Alloy Wheels
  • ABS (Antilock Brakes)
  • Adjustable Steering Col. – Easy Entry/Exit
  • Adjustable Steering Column – Power
  • Air Cond – Climate Control with Remote Start
  • Air Cond. – Climate Control 2 Zone
  • Air Conditioning – Charcoal Filter (Odour Reducer)
  • Air Conditioning – Pollen Filter
  • Air Conditioning – Sensor for Solar/Sun
  • Airbag – Driver
  • Airbag – Knee Driver
  • Airbag – Passenger
  • Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
  • Airbags – Head for 2nd Row Seats
  • Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
  • Aluminium – Bonnet
  • Aluminium – Doors
  • Aluminium – Roof Panel
  • Ambient Lighting – Interior
  • Armrest – Front Centre (Shared)
  • Armrest – Rear Centre (Shared)
  • Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
  • Blind Spot Sensor
  • Blind Spot with Active Assist
  • Bluetooth System
  • Body Colour – Bumpers
  • Body Colour – Door Handles
  • Brake Assist
  • Brake Emergency Display – Hazard/Stoplights
  • Brakes – Regenerative
  • CD Player
  • Camera – Front Vision
  • Camera – Rear Vision
  • Camera – Side Vision
  • Central Locking – Key Proximity
  • Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
  • Chrome Exhaust Tip(s)
  • Chrome Grille Surround
  • Collision Mitigation – Forward (Low speed)
  • Collision Mitigation – Reversing
  • Collision Warning – Forward
  • Control – Corner Braking
  • Control – Electronic Stability
  • Control – Park Distance Front
  • Control – Park Distance Rear
  • Control – Traction
  • Cross Traffic Alert – Front
  • Cruise Control – Distance Control
  • Cruise Control – with Brake Function (limiter)
  • Cup Holders – 1st Row
  • Cup Holders – 2nd Row
  • Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
  • Disc Brakes Rear Ventilated
  • Door Pockets – 1st row (Front)
  • Door Pockets – 2nd row (rear)
  • Driving Mode – Selectable
  • Electric Seat – Drivers with Memory
  • Electric Seats – 1st Row (Front)
  • Engine – Stop Start System (When at idle)
  • Engine Immobiliser
  • First Aid Kit
  • Floor Mats
  • Fog Lamps – Front LED
  • GPS (Satellite Navigation)
  • Gear Shift Paddles behind Steering Wheel
  • Headlamps – LED
  • Heat Insulated – Side Windows
  • Heat Insulated – Windscreen
  • Hill Holder
  • Inbuilt Harddisk Drive
  • Independent Rear Suspension
  • Information Display – Head Up
  • Internet Connectivity via Sim Preparation
  • Keyless Start:- Key/FOB Proximity related
  • Lane Departure Warning
  • Lane Keeping – Active Assist
  • Leather Look – Inserts in Dash
  • Leather Seats
  • Leather Steering Wheel
  • Lighting – Exterior Side
  • Map/Reading Lamps – for 1st Row
  • Map/Reading Lamps – for 2nd Row
  • Multi-function Control Screen – Colour
  • Multi-function Steering Wheel
  • Park Brake – Electric
  • Parking Assistance – Automated Steering
  • Power Door Mirrors – Anti Glare
  • Power Door Mirrors – Auto Dipping (Reversing)
  • Power Steering – Electric Assist
  • Power Steering – Speed Sensitive
  • Power Windows – Front & Rear
  • Radio – Digital (DAB+)
  • Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
  • Rear View Mirror – Electric Anti Glare
  • Remote Boot/Hatch Release
  • Remote Fuel Lid Release
  • Scuff Plates (on door sills)
  • Seat – Rear Opening for Skis/boot access
  • Seatbelt – Load Limiters 1st Row (Front)
  • Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
  • Seats – 2nd Row Split Fold
  • Smart Device App Display/Control
  • Speed Limiter
  • Starter Button
  • Steering Wheel – Sports
  • Storage Compartment – Centre Console 1st Row
  • Telematics – Monitoring Service
  • Trip Computer
  • Tyres – Runflat
  • Voice Recognition
  • Warning – Rear Cross Traffic (when reversing)
  • Wireless Charging – Compatible Devices
  • Woodgrain – Inserts

520d M Sport

Price when new: $101,100

Price used: $46,800 - $51,500

Adds

  • 19″ Alloy Wheels
  • Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
  • Suspension – Sports

530d Luxury Line

Price when new: $119,900

Price used: $53,500 - $58,600

Adds

  • 16 Speaker Stereo
  • Air Cond. – Climate Control 4 Zone
  • Colour Display Screen – Front
  • Control – Electronic Damper
  • Daytime Running Lamps – LED
  • Digital Sound Processing
  • Headlamp – High Beam Auto Dipping
  • Headlamps – Active (Cornering/steering)
  • Headlamps – High Beam Active Shadowing
  • Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
  • Heated Seats – 1st Row
  • Leather Seats – Nappa
  • Power – Boot/Tailgate
  • Premium Sound System
  • Seat – Driver with Electric Lumbar
  • Seat – Passenger with Electric Lumbar
  • Seat – Ventilated Drivers Side
  • Seat – Ventilated Passenger Side

530d M Sport

Price when new: $119,900

Price used: $53,500 - $58,600

530i Luxury Line

Price when new: $108,900

Price used: $45,400 - $50,000

530i M Sport

Price when new: $108,900

Price used: $45,400 - $50,000

540i Luxury Line

Price when new: $136,900

Price used: $62,400 - $68,300

Adds

  • 20″ Alloy Wheels
  • Blind – Power Rear
  • Blinds – Side Windows Rear
  • Control – Rollover Stability
  • Electric Seat – Passenger with Memory
  • Paint – Metallic
  • Sunroof – Electric

540i M Sport

Price when new: $136,900

Price used: $62,400 - $68,300

530e Luxury Line

Price when new: $110,500

Price used: $51,400 - $56,300

Adds

  • Engine Pre-heater
  • Warning – Pedestrian Audible for Silent Vehicles

530e M Sport

Price when new: $110,500

Price used: $51,400 - $56,300

520i Luxury Line

Price when new: $92,200

Price used: $42,400 - $46,600

520i M Sport

Price when new: $99,400

Price used: $45,800 - $50,200

M550i xDrive Pure

Price when new: $134,900

Price used: $78,600 - $85,100

Adds

  • Coloured Door Mirrors
  • Gloss Finish – Bumper Inserts
  • Headlining – Colour
  • Smart Device Integration – Apple CarPlay
  • Spoiler – Rear
  • Subwoofer x2
  • Tyre Repair Kit
  • Tyres – High Performance/Soft Compound

M550i xDrive

Price when new: $149,900

Price used: $93,500 - $100,500

Adds

  • 4 Wheel Steer
  • Headlamps – Laser
  • Leather Trimmed – Instrument Pod Cover
  • Power Door Closing Aid
  • Power Steering – Variable Ratio (more lock faster)
  • Rollover Protection – Active
  • Suspension – Lowered

Tech specs

Body Styles

  • 4 door Sedan
  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 140kW / 400Nm (520d Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 520d M Sport 2016 – 2020)
  • 3.0 litre, 6-cylinder turbo diesel, 195kW / 620Nm (530d Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 530d M Sport 2016 – 2022)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 185kW / 350Nm (530i Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 530i M Sport 2016 – 2022)
  • 3.0 litre, 6-cylinder turbo petrol, 250kW / 450Nm (540i Luxury Line 2016 – 2019, 540i M Sport 2016 – 2019)
  • 2.0T/83kW Hybrid 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 290Nm (530e Luxury Line 2017 – 2020, 530e M Sport 2017 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 290Nm (520i Luxury Line 2017 – 2020, 520i M Sport 2017 – 2022)
  • 4.4 litre, 8-cylinder twin turbo petrol, 390kW / 750Nm (M550i xDrive Pure 2019 – 2022, M550i xDrive 2020 – 2022)
  • 2.0T/80kW Hybrid 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 300Nm (530e M Sport 2020 – 2022)

Transmission

  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (All Models)

Fuel Consumption

  • 4.6 – 6.1 / 100km (530d Luxury Line)
  • 4.8 – 6.7 / 100km (530d M Sport)
  • 5.9 – 8.1 / 100km (530i M Sport)
  • 5.9 – 9.3 / 100km (540i Luxury Line, 540i M Sport)
  • 5.8 – 8.5 / 100km (520i M Sport)
  • 8.3 – 14.9 / 100km (M550i xDrive Pure, M550i xDrive)

Length

  • 4936mm – 4972mm (4 door Sedan)
  • 4942mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

  • 1868mm (All

Body Styles

  • 4 door Sedan
  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 140kW / 400Nm (520d Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 520d M Sport 2016 – 2020)
  • 3.0 litre, 6-cylinder turbo diesel, 195kW / 620Nm (530d Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 530d M Sport 2016 – 2022)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 185kW / 350Nm (530i Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 530i M Sport 2016 – 2022)
  • 3.0 litre, 6-cylinder turbo petrol, 250kW / 450Nm (540i Luxury Line 2016 – 2019, 540i M Sport 2016 – 2019)
  • 2.0T/83kW Hybrid 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 290Nm (530e Luxury Line 2017 – 2020, 530e M Sport 2017 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 290Nm (520i Luxury Line 2017 – 2020, 520i M Sport 2017 – 2022)
  • 4.4 litre, 8-cylinder twin turbo petrol, 390kW / 750Nm (M550i xDrive Pure 2019 – 2022, M550i xDrive 2020 – 2022)
  • 2.0T/80kW Hybrid 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 300Nm (530e M Sport 2020 – 2022)

Transmission

  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (All Models)

Fuel Consumption

  • 4.6 – 6.1 / 100km (530d Luxury Line)
  • 4.8 – 6.7 / 100km (530d M Sport)
  • 5.9 – 8.1 / 100km (530i M Sport)
  • 5.9 – 9.3 / 100km (540i Luxury Line, 540i M Sport)
  • 5.8 – 8.5 / 100km (520i M Sport)
  • 8.3 – 14.9 / 100km (M550i xDrive Pure, M550i xDrive)

Length

  • 4936mm – 4972mm (4 door Sedan)
  • 4942mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

  • 1868mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1467mm – 1483mm (4 door Sedan)
  • 1498mm (5 door Wagon)

Wheelbase

  • 2975mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1915kg (4 door Sedan)
  • 1660kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

  • 2000kg (braked) (4 door Sedan)
  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2000kg (braked) (5 door Wagon)

Ancap Ratings

  • 5 stars, tested 2017 (520d Luxury Line, 520d M Sport)
  • Not tested (530d Luxury Line, 530d M Sport, 530i Luxury Line, 530i M Sport, 540i Luxury Line, 540i M Sport, 530e Luxury Line, 530e M Sport, 520i Luxury Line, 520i M Sport, 520d Luxury Line, 520d M Sport, M550i xDrive Pure, M550i xDrive)

Body Styles

  • 4 door Sedan
  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 140kW / 400Nm (520d Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 520d M Sport 2016 – 2020)
  • 3.0 litre, 6-cylinder turbo diesel, 195kW / 620Nm (530d Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 530d M Sport 2016 – 2022)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 185kW / 350Nm (530i Luxury Line 2016 – 2020, 530i M Sport 2016 – 2022)
  • 3.0 litre, 6-cylinder turbo petrol, 250kW / 450Nm (540i Luxury Line 2016 – 2019, 540i M Sport 2016 – 2019)
  • 2.0T/83kW Hybrid 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 290Nm (530e Luxury Line 2017 – 2020, 530e M Sport 2017 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 290Nm (520i Luxury Line 2017 – 2020, 520i M Sport 2017 – 2022)
  • 4.4 litre, 8-cylinder twin turbo petrol, 390kW / 750Nm (M550i xDrive Pure 2019 – 2022, M550i xDrive 2020 – 2022)
  • 2.0T/80kW Hybrid 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 135kW / 300Nm (530e M Sport 2020 – 2022)

Transmission

  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (All Models)

Fuel Consumption

  • 4.6 – 6.1 / 100km (530d Luxury Line)
  • 4.8 – 6.7 / 100km (530d M Sport)
  • 5.9 – 8.1 / 100km (530i M Sport)
  • 5.9 – 9.3 / 100km (540i Luxury Line, 540i M Sport)
  • 5.8 – 8.5 / 100km (520i M Sport)
  • 8.3 – 14.9 / 100km (M550i xDrive Pure, M550i xDrive)

Length

  • 4936mm – 4972mm (4 door Sedan)
  • 4942mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

  • 1868mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1467mm – 1483mm (4 door Sedan)
  • 1498mm (5 door Wagon)

Wheelbase

  • 2975mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1915kg (4 door Sedan)
  • 1660kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

  • 2000kg (braked) (4 door Sedan)
  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2000kg (braked) (5 door Wagon)

Ancap Ratings

  • 5 stars, tested 2017 (520d Luxury Line, 520d M Sport)
  • Not tested (530d Luxury Line, 530d M Sport, 530i Luxury Line, 530i M Sport, 540i Luxury Line, 540i M Sport, 530e Luxury Line, 530e M Sport, 520i Luxury Line, 520i M Sport, 520d Luxury Line, 520d M Sport, M550i xDrive Pure, M550i xDrive)

Warranty & servicing

Warranty

  • 3 years / unlimited km (520d Luxury Line, 520d M Sport, 530d Luxury Line, 530d M Sport, 530i Luxury Line, 530i M Sport, 540i Luxury Line, 540i M Sport, 530e Luxury Line, 530e M Sport, 520i Luxury Line, 520i M Sport, M550i xDrive Pure, M550i xDrive)
  • 5 years / unlimited km (520i M Sport, 530i M Sport, 530e M Sport, 530d M Sport, M550i xDrive Pure, M550i xDrive)

Servicing

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Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of May 27, 2024.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

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