Pros

  • Stunning design.
  • Not as predictable a purchase choice as BMW, Audi and Mercedes-Benz.
  • There is just something special about driving a Jaguar.
  • Executes exactly what a car in this class should, until it doesn’t.

Cons

  • Horrible reputation for reliability and very long list of common issues.
  • Expensive repair and maintenance costs.
  • Inconsistent build quality.
  • Possibly more style than substance.

Verdict

Should you buy a Jaguar XF? We think after reading this cheat sheet you know the answer, for most of us, no, of course not.

The range of common issues and faults is vast and unfortunately, reported regularly. Add to that that fixing these issues will most likely be expensive...

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What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

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Designed by master automotive artist Ian Callum and produced to go head to head against vehicles like the 5-Series BMW, Mercedes-Benz E-Class and Audi A6, the first generation or 2007 to 2015 UK produced X250 XF has been available purely as a sedan, however some markets have been treated to a wagon (or Sportbrake as Jaguar call it).

Locally there has been the choice of no less than 10 different power plants, spread across four, six and eight cylinders, some turbo or supercharged, some as diesels and others not, all of which will dictate the specific model designation of XF

Plus these engines power outputs will vary on the year model, trim spec and which way the wind is blowing however, unlike some international markets, all Australian examples send power to the rear wheels via a six or eight-speed automatics.

Then there have been at least a dozen model designations to choose from, all of which will vary depending on the year model, plus there have been the individual trim specs which initially consisted of five levels, although that made far too much sense so Jaguar then included the SV8 which was very similar to the top spec R even though it totally isn’t, not to mention the addition of a limited edition 75th Anniversary model.

Then we come to the 2011 update that changes everything, yet it doesn’t, but at the same time, it still does.

Obviously there was the obligatory updates to features, tech and of course mechanical

Designed by master automotive artist Ian Callum and produced to go head to head against vehicles like the 5-Series BMW, Mercedes-Benz E-Class and Audi A6, the first generation or 2007 to 2015 UK produced X250 XF has been available purely as a sedan, however some markets have been treated to a wagon (or Sportbrake as Jaguar call it).

Locally there has been the choice of no less than 10 different power plants, spread across four, six and eight cylinders, some turbo or supercharged, some as diesels and others not, all of which will dictate the specific model designation of XF

Plus these engines power outputs will vary on the year model, trim spec and which way the wind is blowing however, unlike some international markets, all Australian examples send power to the rear wheels via a six or eight-speed automatics.

Then there have been at least a dozen model designations to choose from, all of which will vary depending on the year model, plus there have been the individual trim specs which initially consisted of five levels, although that made far too much sense so Jaguar then included the SV8 which was very similar to the top spec R even though it totally isn’t, not to mention the addition of a limited edition 75th Anniversary model.

Then we come to the 2011 update that changes everything, yet it doesn’t, but at the same time, it still does.

Obviously there was the obligatory updates to features, tech and of course mechanical revisions, and visually the XF was treated to a facelift, but in terms of exactly what XF was available, forget five, or is it six different trim levels, Jaguar increased the range to seven, but even then, this doesn’t include the range of enhancement packs which could be argued are so substantial, they could be their very own variants.

And we haven’t touched on optional extras or even what changes you could make within each variant, to say the XF can be confusing is quite the understatement.

Designed by master automotive artist Ian Callum and produced to go head to head against vehicles like the 5-Series BMW, Mercedes-Benz E-Class and Audi A6, the first generation or 2007 to 2015 UK produced X250 XF has been available purely as a sedan, however some markets have been treated to a wagon (or Sportbrake as Jaguar call it).

Locally there has been the choice of no less than 10 different power plants, spread across four, six and eight cylinders, some turbo or supercharged, some as diesels and others not, all of which will dictate the specific model designation of XF

Plus these engines power outputs will vary on the year model, trim spec and which way the wind is blowing however, unlike some international markets, all Australian examples send power to the rear wheels via a six or eight-speed automatics.

Then there have been at least a dozen model designations to choose from, all of which will vary depending on the year model, plus there have been the individual trim specs which initially consisted of five levels, although that made far too much sense so Jaguar then included the SV8 which was very similar to the top spec R even though it totally isn’t, not to mention the addition of a limited edition 75th Anniversary model.

Then we come to the 2011 update that changes everything, yet it doesn’t, but at the same time, it still does.

Obviously there was the obligatory updates to features, tech and of course mechanical revisions, and visually the XF was treated to a facelift, but in terms of exactly what XF was available, forget five, or is it six different trim levels, Jaguar increased the range to seven, but even then, this doesn’t include the range of enhancement packs which could be argued are so substantial, they could be their very own variants.

And we haven’t touched on optional extras or even what changes you could make within each variant, to say the XF can be confusing is quite the understatement.

Exterior:

There are quite a few complaints that alloy wheels can crack easily, they shouldn’t crack in the first place but it seems that more specifically they tend to crack around 65,000 km’s.

There are reports of fuel caps just refusing to open.

The wiring loom routed into the boot can become damaged and worn, resulting in problems and failure of the rear camera, boot lights, numberplate lights and boot release.

Door locks have been known to fail.

There are cases of the windscreens delaminating over time.

The pump for the windscreen washer is known to leak, now this may seem like a minor inconvenience until you find out that the washer fluid usually leaks through the firewall and slowly but surely makes its way into the passenger side fusebox in the cabin.

The electric window regulators can fail randomly.

Models that are fitted with sunroofs have been known to make various squeaking or creaking noises.

The chrome trim around the doors can turn milky. It is possible to replace, however Jaguar parts are expensive.

The battery clamp in the boot – its fixings are exposed and inevitably corrode, resulting in a battery replacement taking a lot longer than expected. It’s worth regularly cleaning and greasing this thread.

Interior:

There have been reports of touchscreens showing a black/blank screen, or just showing the Jaguar logo and nothing else. If you face this issue it’s likely that the module will need to be reprogrammed.

The infotainment system can develop problems, often caused by water ingress under the front passenger’s seat. The water can damage most system modules, such as the Bluetooth, audio and DAB modules.
Overhead Console/Reading Lights have been known to flash or flicker due to the connectors corroding prematurely.

Instrument clusters are prone to glitching out and doing the same.

The gear selector rotator knob has also been known to not raise/remain lowered when the button is pressed, this means you won’t be able to access drive or reverse gear.

Rattles are quite a prominent one, as there have been complaints from owners who have heard them in the doors, sunroof and dashboard.

The leather on the top of the dash, specifically towards the back, can be prone to getting this wavy and loose fitted effect. In more severe instances it can actually separate from the dashboard entirely and start lifting off like a combover, and nobody wants a combover.

The HVAC vents automatically open and close when the ignition is switched on and off, but the motors that operate them can fail.

Door latch regulator failure on appears to be a common problem,
Overall with the interior, anything electrical can suffer from issues.

Mechanical:

Starting with

Exterior:

There are quite a few complaints that alloy wheels can crack easily, they shouldn’t crack in the first place but it seems that more specifically they tend to crack around 65,000 km’s.

There are reports of fuel caps just refusing to open.

The wiring loom routed into the boot can become damaged and worn, resulting in problems and failure of the rear camera, boot lights, numberplate lights and boot release.

Door locks have been known to fail.

There are cases of the windscreens delaminating over time.

The pump for the windscreen washer is known to leak, now this may seem like a minor inconvenience until you find out that the washer fluid usually leaks through the firewall and slowly but surely makes its way into the passenger side fusebox in the cabin.

The electric window regulators can fail randomly.

Models that are fitted with sunroofs have been known to make various squeaking or creaking noises.

The chrome trim around the doors can turn milky. It is possible to replace, however Jaguar parts are expensive.

The battery clamp in the boot – its fixings are exposed and inevitably corrode, resulting in a battery replacement taking a lot longer than expected. It’s worth regularly cleaning and greasing this thread.

Interior:

There have been reports of touchscreens showing a black/blank screen, or just showing the Jaguar logo and nothing else. If you face this issue it’s likely that the module will need to be reprogrammed.

The infotainment system can develop problems, often caused by water ingress under the front passenger’s seat. The water can damage most system modules, such as the Bluetooth, audio and DAB modules.
Overhead Console/Reading Lights have been known to flash or flicker due to the connectors corroding prematurely.

Instrument clusters are prone to glitching out and doing the same.

The gear selector rotator knob has also been known to not raise/remain lowered when the button is pressed, this means you won’t be able to access drive or reverse gear.

Rattles are quite a prominent one, as there have been complaints from owners who have heard them in the doors, sunroof and dashboard.

The leather on the top of the dash, specifically towards the back, can be prone to getting this wavy and loose fitted effect. In more severe instances it can actually separate from the dashboard entirely and start lifting off like a combover, and nobody wants a combover.

The HVAC vents automatically open and close when the ignition is switched on and off, but the motors that operate them can fail.

Door latch regulator failure on appears to be a common problem,
Overall with the interior, anything electrical can suffer from issues.

Mechanical:

Starting with the 2.0L 4-cyl petrol, this is the same engine as used in a variety of Ford, Land Rover and even Volvo models and this 2-Litre version is arguably the best of the 4-cylinder Ecoboost familty.

Partly because it had a much stronger closed deck block and suffers fewer of the head gasket issues found surrounding the 2.3-litre as in the Ford Mustang and RS Focus. It is typically pretty reliable with no one big common issue taking them out.

The 2.2-Litre diesel is again a Ford motor, this time from the Duratorque family and is basically the same engine as found in the Ford Mondeo.

It does have a timing belt which is due every 180,000km but can fail far earlier. There is also a secondary timing chain in the head which is known to slip and cause damage to rocker arms and valves. However, this is not regarded by Jaguar as a maintenance item, so, best of luck with that.

The V6 diesel, is yet another Ford engine with a few well documented issues.

Turbo, EGR and high-pressure fuel pump problems, split manifolds, leaking oil coolers, coolant leaks from water pumps and thermostat housings are common.

However the big one is bottom end failure. Big end and main bearing failures are common in these engines (when compared to other cars).

When this failure occurs, it typically means a whole new engine.

Plus the ongoing running costs of these are pushed up by the timing belt requirements. The main belt and the secondary fuel pump belt have to be done at 165,000kms.

We are going to group the petrol V6 and V8 engines together as they do share a lot of components and therefore problems.

Fun fact, the V6 is basically the V8 block casting with the back two cylinders blanked off. Cheap to make and weird.

The most common failure is timing chain tensioners and guides failing, which leads to timing chains skipping and causing valve train and camshaft annihilation.

On super charged examples, the super charger drive coupling is a common failure.

The cooling system on all XF models is quite fragile thanks to being made predominantly of plastic. Water pump leaks are common and plastic components like thermostat housings and expansion tanks tend to split and leak.

The key to reducing the likelihood of the serious internal engine problems here is servicing, but, the problem here is owners thinking they’re servicing them properly.

But those scheduled services are only due every 26,000km. This is utter madness. No engine, even with the best long life oil will last with service intervals like that. You must service every 10,00km.

The transmissions are a ZF and they are pretty much the same as found in an array of rear-wheel drive applications including many BMWs including the current Toyota Supra.

As far as issues with the transmission, they can suffer from the occasional solenoid, valve body and clutch pack issue. Oil cooler issues and oil leaks are not unheard of, but overall, the ZF is pretty reliable.

However, again, ignore the 230,000km service intervals, servicing every 100,00km is good, 50,000km is better.

Recalls:

  • August & November 2008 – Jaguar X250 XF vehicles recalled due to rear seatbelt D-loops that may not freely rotate, potentially causing rear seat occupants to not be fully restrained in the event of a moderate-to-heavy front impact.
  • December 2008 – Jaguar X250 XF recalled due to potential fracturing of wires in instrument cluster speaker causing failure due to an overly aggressive ‘tick tock’ sound wave form, particularly at high speeds.
  • October 2009 – Jaguar XF models with 3.0-litre turbo-diesel engines (VIN range R47154 to R59504) recalled due to potential engine cut out caused by in-tank electric fuel pump not activating correctly after start-up cycle. Vehicle can be restarted by cranking engine for 20-30 seconds.
  • November 2009 – Recall issued for 2010 Jaguar XF models with 3.0 and 4.2 petrol engines due to incorrectly designed fuel transfer tube in fuel tank causing fuel starvation and loss of power assisted steering and brake vacuum reservoir replenishment when fuel level below one-quarter tank. Restart only possible after refuelling.
  • August 2010 – Recall issued for Jaguar X250 XF 5.0 V8 models due to potential fuel pump malfunction causing engine shutdown. Power steering could also be affected if vehicle speed drops below the torque converter’s threshold.
  • March 2011 – Recall issued for 2010 Jaguar X250 XF due to potential loss of power steering fluid caused by corroded power steering pipes with inadequate corrosion protection. Leakage could result in loss of power assistance steering system and possible ignition of the fluid.
  • December 2012 – Recall for Jaguar XFs with 5.0-litre V8 engines manufactured from 2010 to 2012 due to potential fuel leak from cracked fuel tank outlet mounting flange, causing malfunction indicator lamp to appear and fuel odour/smell with liquid fuel potentially visible underneath the vehicle when stationary.
  • August 2013 – Recall issued for 124 model year Jaguar XF 2013 vehicles with 2.0-litre turbocharged petrol engines due to charge air cooler hose detachment. Engine may cut out, posing hazard to driver and road users.
  • August 2013 – Recall issued for 641 model year 2012-14 Jaguar X250 F 2.2 Diesel vehicles due to potential fuel leak from engine-mounted injector spill rail spigot to the spill return pipe connector joint, posing a risk of under-bonnet fire.
  • April 2014 – Recall issued for 2013-14 Jaguar X250 XFR-S due to toe link fracture possibility during prolonged track use, affecting vehicles with serial numbers S65176 to U23754, posing hazard to driver and other road users.
  • June 2014 – Recall issued for Jaguar XFR-S variants due to potential loss of brake fluid. Right hand rear brake pipe may wear through and cause sudden loss of brake fluid, compromising vehicle stability and increasing the risk of an accident. Red warning triangle would appear in the instrument cluster and display the words ‘low brake fluid’ if loss of fluid occurred.
  • June 2016 – Recall issued for 2013-2015 Jaguar X250 XF 2.0 GTDi due to a bolt failure that caused a loss of accessory drive, resulting in battery charge warning, air conditioning failure, engine overheating, Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) and reduction in steering assistance, posing a hazard to the driver and other road users.
  • July 2016 – Recall issued for 2012 Jaguar X250 XF 3.0 TDV6 due to incorrectly manufactured crank position sensor causing engine to not start or stop running without warning. Loss of power braking and steering assistance could occur, increasing brake and steering effort. Accidents could result from engine cessation while driving.
  • Feb 2017 – Recall for 2013-15 Jaguar X250 XF 2.0 GTDi due to potential fuel leak. Insufficient clearance of under-floor fuel pipe assembly may cause chafing against shield and body, resulting in fuel leakage and risk of fire if parked in the presence of an ignition source.
  • July 2018 – Recall issued for Jaguar X250 XF vehicles due to potential rupture of the airbag inflator housing in the event of a collision, posing a serious risk of injury and fatality.

Exterior:

There are quite a few complaints that alloy wheels can crack easily, they shouldn’t crack in the first place but it seems that more specifically they tend to crack around 65,000 km’s.

There are reports of fuel caps just refusing to open.

The wiring loom routed into the boot can become damaged and worn, resulting in problems and failure of the rear camera, boot lights, numberplate lights and boot release.

Door locks have been known to fail.

There are cases of the windscreens delaminating over time.

The pump for the windscreen washer is known to leak, now this may seem like a minor inconvenience until you find out that the washer fluid usually leaks through the firewall and slowly but surely makes its way into the passenger side fusebox in the cabin.

The electric window regulators can fail randomly.

Models that are fitted with sunroofs have been known to make various squeaking or creaking noises.

The chrome trim around the doors can turn milky. It is possible to replace, however Jaguar parts are expensive.

The battery clamp in the boot – its fixings are exposed and inevitably corrode, resulting in a battery replacement taking a lot longer than expected. It’s worth regularly cleaning and greasing this thread.

Interior:

There have been reports of touchscreens showing a black/blank screen, or just showing the Jaguar logo and nothing else. If you face this issue it’s likely that the module will need to be reprogrammed.

The infotainment system can develop problems, often caused by water ingress under the front passenger’s seat. The water can damage most system modules, such as the Bluetooth, audio and DAB modules.
Overhead Console/Reading Lights have been known to flash or flicker due to the connectors corroding prematurely.

Instrument clusters are prone to glitching out and doing the same.

The gear selector rotator knob has also been known to not raise/remain lowered when the button is pressed, this means you won’t be able to access drive or reverse gear.

Rattles are quite a prominent one, as there have been complaints from owners who have heard them in the doors, sunroof and dashboard.

The leather on the top of the dash, specifically towards the back, can be prone to getting this wavy and loose fitted effect. In more severe instances it can actually separate from the dashboard entirely and start lifting off like a combover, and nobody wants a combover.

The HVAC vents automatically open and close when the ignition is switched on and off, but the motors that operate them can fail.

Door latch regulator failure on appears to be a common problem,
Overall with the interior, anything electrical can suffer from issues.

Mechanical:

Starting with the 2.0L 4-cyl petrol, this is the same engine as used in a variety of Ford, Land Rover and even Volvo models and this 2-Litre version is arguably the best of the 4-cylinder Ecoboost familty.

Partly because it had a much stronger closed deck block and suffers fewer of the head gasket issues found surrounding the 2.3-litre as in the Ford Mustang and RS Focus. It is typically pretty reliable with no one big common issue taking them out.

The 2.2-Litre diesel is again a Ford motor, this time from the Duratorque family and is basically the same engine as found in the Ford Mondeo.

It does have a timing belt which is due every 180,000km but can fail far earlier. There is also a secondary timing chain in the head which is known to slip and cause damage to rocker arms and valves. However, this is not regarded by Jaguar as a maintenance item, so, best of luck with that.

The V6 diesel, is yet another Ford engine with a few well documented issues.

Turbo, EGR and high-pressure fuel pump problems, split manifolds, leaking oil coolers, coolant leaks from water pumps and thermostat housings are common.

However the big one is bottom end failure. Big end and main bearing failures are common in these engines (when compared to other cars).

When this failure occurs, it typically means a whole new engine.

Plus the ongoing running costs of these are pushed up by the timing belt requirements. The main belt and the secondary fuel pump belt have to be done at 165,000kms.

We are going to group the petrol V6 and V8 engines together as they do share a lot of components and therefore problems.

Fun fact, the V6 is basically the V8 block casting with the back two cylinders blanked off. Cheap to make and weird.

The most common failure is timing chain tensioners and guides failing, which leads to timing chains skipping and causing valve train and camshaft annihilation.

On super charged examples, the super charger drive coupling is a common failure.

The cooling system on all XF models is quite fragile thanks to being made predominantly of plastic. Water pump leaks are common and plastic components like thermostat housings and expansion tanks tend to split and leak.

The key to reducing the likelihood of the serious internal engine problems here is servicing, but, the problem here is owners thinking they’re servicing them properly.

But those scheduled services are only due every 26,000km. This is utter madness. No engine, even with the best long life oil will last with service intervals like that. You must service every 10,00km.

The transmissions are a ZF and they are pretty much the same as found in an array of rear-wheel drive applications including many BMWs including the current Toyota Supra.

As far as issues with the transmission, they can suffer from the occasional solenoid, valve body and clutch pack issue. Oil cooler issues and oil leaks are not unheard of, but overall, the ZF is pretty reliable.

However, again, ignore the 230,000km service intervals, servicing every 100,00km is good, 50,000km is better.

Recalls:

  • August & November 2008 – Jaguar X250 XF vehicles recalled due to rear seatbelt D-loops that may not freely rotate, potentially causing rear seat occupants to not be fully restrained in the event of a moderate-to-heavy front impact.
  • December 2008 – Jaguar X250 XF recalled due to potential fracturing of wires in instrument cluster speaker causing failure due to an overly aggressive ‘tick tock’ sound wave form, particularly at high speeds.
  • October 2009 – Jaguar XF models with 3.0-litre turbo-diesel engines (VIN range R47154 to R59504) recalled due to potential engine cut out caused by in-tank electric fuel pump not activating correctly after start-up cycle. Vehicle can be restarted by cranking engine for 20-30 seconds.
  • November 2009 – Recall issued for 2010 Jaguar XF models with 3.0 and 4.2 petrol engines due to incorrectly designed fuel transfer tube in fuel tank causing fuel starvation and loss of power assisted steering and brake vacuum reservoir replenishment when fuel level below one-quarter tank. Restart only possible after refuelling.
  • August 2010 – Recall issued for Jaguar X250 XF 5.0 V8 models due to potential fuel pump malfunction causing engine shutdown. Power steering could also be affected if vehicle speed drops below the torque converter’s threshold.
  • March 2011 – Recall issued for 2010 Jaguar X250 XF due to potential loss of power steering fluid caused by corroded power steering pipes with inadequate corrosion protection. Leakage could result in loss of power assistance steering system and possible ignition of the fluid.
  • December 2012 – Recall for Jaguar XFs with 5.0-litre V8 engines manufactured from 2010 to 2012 due to potential fuel leak from cracked fuel tank outlet mounting flange, causing malfunction indicator lamp to appear and fuel odour/smell with liquid fuel potentially visible underneath the vehicle when stationary.
  • August 2013 – Recall issued for 124 model year Jaguar XF 2013 vehicles with 2.0-litre turbocharged petrol engines due to charge air cooler hose detachment. Engine may cut out, posing hazard to driver and road users.
  • August 2013 – Recall issued for 641 model year 2012-14 Jaguar X250 F 2.2 Diesel vehicles due to potential fuel leak from engine-mounted injector spill rail spigot to the spill return pipe connector joint, posing a risk of under-bonnet fire.
  • April 2014 – Recall issued for 2013-14 Jaguar X250 XFR-S due to toe link fracture possibility during prolonged track use, affecting vehicles with serial numbers S65176 to U23754, posing hazard to driver and other road users.
  • June 2014 – Recall issued for Jaguar XFR-S variants due to potential loss of brake fluid. Right hand rear brake pipe may wear through and cause sudden loss of brake fluid, compromising vehicle stability and increasing the risk of an accident. Red warning triangle would appear in the instrument cluster and display the words ‘low brake fluid’ if loss of fluid occurred.
  • June 2016 – Recall issued for 2013-2015 Jaguar X250 XF 2.0 GTDi due to a bolt failure that caused a loss of accessory drive, resulting in battery charge warning, air conditioning failure, engine overheating, Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) and reduction in steering assistance, posing a hazard to the driver and other road users.
  • July 2016 – Recall issued for 2012 Jaguar X250 XF 3.0 TDV6 due to incorrectly manufactured crank position sensor causing engine to not start or stop running without warning. Loss of power braking and steering assistance could occur, increasing brake and steering effort. Accidents could result from engine cessation while driving.
  • Feb 2017 – Recall for 2013-15 Jaguar X250 XF 2.0 GTDi due to potential fuel leak. Insufficient clearance of under-floor fuel pipe assembly may cause chafing against shield and body, resulting in fuel leakage and risk of fire if parked in the presence of an ignition source.
  • July 2018 – Recall issued for Jaguar X250 XF vehicles due to potential rupture of the airbag inflator housing in the event of a collision, posing a serious risk of injury and fatality.

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol – 2.0T (Luxury, Premium Luxury) – From 2012
2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel – 2.2D (Luxury, Premium Luxury) – From 2011
2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel – 2.7D (Luxury) – 2008-2011
3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel – 3.0D/3.0D S (3.0D S, Luxury, Portfolio, Premium Luxury)
3.0 litre V6 petrol – 3.0 V6 (3.0 V6, Luxury)
3.0 ltre supercharged V6 petrol – 3.0S (Luxury, Portfolio) – From 2012
4.2 litre V8 petrol – 4.2 V8 (Premium Luxury)
5.0 litre V8 petrol – 5.0 V8 (5.0 V8, Premium Luxury, Portfolio)
4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (SV8)
5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR, XFR-S)

Power:

176kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol
140kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel
152kW – 2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel
177kW – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D)
202kW – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D S)
175kW – 3.0 litre V6 petrol
283kW – 3.0 litre supercharged V6 petrol
219kW – 4.2 litre V8 petrol
283kW – 5.0 litre V8 petrol
306kW – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol
375kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR)
404kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR-S)

Torque:

340Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol
450Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel
435Nm – 2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel
500Nm – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol – 2.0T (Luxury, Premium Luxury) – From 2012
2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel – 2.2D (Luxury, Premium Luxury) – From 2011
2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel – 2.7D (Luxury) – 2008-2011
3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel – 3.0D/3.0D S (3.0D S, Luxury, Portfolio, Premium Luxury)
3.0 litre V6 petrol – 3.0 V6 (3.0 V6, Luxury)
3.0 ltre supercharged V6 petrol – 3.0S (Luxury, Portfolio) – From 2012
4.2 litre V8 petrol – 4.2 V8 (Premium Luxury)
5.0 litre V8 petrol – 5.0 V8 (5.0 V8, Premium Luxury, Portfolio)
4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (SV8)
5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR, XFR-S)

Power:

176kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol
140kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel
152kW – 2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel
177kW – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D)
202kW – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D S)
175kW – 3.0 litre V6 petrol
283kW – 3.0 litre supercharged V6 petrol
219kW – 4.2 litre V8 petrol
283kW – 5.0 litre V8 petrol
306kW – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol
375kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR)
404kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR-S)

Torque:

340Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol
450Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel
435Nm – 2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel
500Nm – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D)
600Nm – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D S)
293Nm – 3.0 litre V6 petrol
515Nm – 3.0 litre supercharged V6 petrol
411Nm – 4.2 litre V8 petrol
515Nm – 5.0 litre V8 petrol
560Nm – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol
625Nm – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR)
680Nm – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR-S)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – 2.7D, 3.0D S, 3.0 V6, 4.2 V8, 5.0 V8, SV8, R
8-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – 2.0T, 2.2D, 3.0D, 3.0D S – From 2011, 3.0S – From 2011, XFR – From 2012, XFR-S

Fuel Consumption:

6.8 – 12.6L/100km

Length:

4,961mm

Width:

1,877mm

Height:

1,460mm

Kerb Weight:

1590 – 1891kg (4 door Sedan)

1705 – 1855kg (5 door Wagon)

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol – 2.0T (Luxury, Premium Luxury) – From 2012
2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel – 2.2D (Luxury, Premium Luxury) – From 2011
2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel – 2.7D (Luxury) – 2008-2011
3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel – 3.0D/3.0D S (3.0D S, Luxury, Portfolio, Premium Luxury)
3.0 litre V6 petrol – 3.0 V6 (3.0 V6, Luxury)
3.0 ltre supercharged V6 petrol – 3.0S (Luxury, Portfolio) – From 2012
4.2 litre V8 petrol – 4.2 V8 (Premium Luxury)
5.0 litre V8 petrol – 5.0 V8 (5.0 V8, Premium Luxury, Portfolio)
4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (SV8)
5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR, XFR-S)

Power:

176kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol
140kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel
152kW – 2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel
177kW – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D)
202kW – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D S)
175kW – 3.0 litre V6 petrol
283kW – 3.0 litre supercharged V6 petrol
219kW – 4.2 litre V8 petrol
283kW – 5.0 litre V8 petrol
306kW – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol
375kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR)
404kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR-S)

Torque:

340Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol
450Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo diesel
435Nm – 2.7 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel
500Nm – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D)
600Nm – 3.0 litre twin-turbo V6 diesel (3.0D S)
293Nm – 3.0 litre V6 petrol
515Nm – 3.0 litre supercharged V6 petrol
411Nm – 4.2 litre V8 petrol
515Nm – 5.0 litre V8 petrol
560Nm – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol
625Nm – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR)
680Nm – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (XFR-S)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – 2.7D, 3.0D S, 3.0 V6, 4.2 V8, 5.0 V8, SV8, R
8-speed automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – 2.0T, 2.2D, 3.0D, 3.0D S – From 2011, 3.0S – From 2011, XFR – From 2012, XFR-S

Fuel Consumption:

6.8 – 12.6L/100km

Length:

4,961mm

Width:

1,877mm

Height:

1,460mm

Kerb Weight:

1590 – 1891kg (4 door Sedan)

1705 – 1855kg (5 door Wagon)

Warranty:

3 years/100,000km
3 years/unlimited kms (MY12 onwards)

Servicing:

12 months/16,000km

Model range, pricing & features

Jaguar XF-1

XF

Price when new: $93,815 - $128,000

Price used: $9,000 - $20,600

The XF or engine designated model was the entry-level model in the XF range, available in a wide range of engines from a 4-cylinder engine through to the 5.0 litre V8 model, thus giving this model a $30k price variance depending on the engine choice.

An update in 2011 added daytime running lights, styling changes and a higher-resolution TFT computer.

Given the nearly all mainstream choices for engine are available in the Luxury and Premium Luxury models (and in some cases for less money), we would be recommending looking at those models given the addition equipment you would be able to get on those models.

Standard Features:

17-inch alloy wheels
Space saver spare wheel
Body coloured bumper bars
Body coloured side mirrors
4-star ANCAP safety rating (tested 2011)
Driver and front passenger airbags
Front side airbags
Full-length curtain airbags
3-point (lap sash) seatbelt for all occupants
Height adjustable seatbelts for driver and front passenger
Seat pretensioners and load limiters for for driver and front passenger
Child seat anchor points
Seatbelt reminder for driver’s seat
Headrests for all occupants
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD)
Brake assist
Dyanmic stability control (DSC)
Traction control
Speed limiter
Rear parking sensors
Electric side mirrors
Heated side mirrors
Electric windows – front and rear with auto up/down function for all windows
Cruise control
Halogen headlights
Rear LED taillights
Automatic headlights
Interior ambient lighting
Rain sensing (auto) wipers
Remote central locking with keyless entry (via button on door handle)
Push button start
Engine immobiliser
Alarm
Tachometer
Fuel gauge
Trip computer
Electromechnical handbrake
Power steering
Steering wheel – tilt (up/down) and telescopic (reach) adjust
Electronically adjustable steering column
Gearshift paddles
Multi-functional leather sterring wheel
Dual-zone climate control
Rear air vents
Leather upholstery
Electrically adjustable front seats
7.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system
8-speaker sound system
AM/FM radio
CD player
Bluetooth connectivity – phone and audio streaming
Satellite navigation
AUX (3.5mm) input
iPod connectivity
12V power outlet
Front cup holders – 3x
Rear cup holders – 2x
Front bottle holders – 2x
Rear bottle holders – 2x
Centre console storage
Glovebox

October 2011 update:

Daytime running LED lights
Reshaped bonnet
Triangular side vents
High-resolution TFT trip computer

Luxury

Price when new: $68,075 - $129,600

Price used: $7,400 - $30,600

The Luxury adds 18-inch alloys, driver memory settings, 10-way electrically adjustable front seats and a 6-stacker in-dash CD player.

In October 2011 – the Premium model gained daytime running LED lights, front parking sensors and a reversing camera.

In addition to the 3.0D S:

18-inch alloy wheels
Driver memory settings (seat, mirrors and steering wheel)
10-Way electrically adjustable driver and front passenger’s seat
6-disc in-dash CD player

October 2011 updates:

Reshaped bonnet
Triangular side vents
Bi-xenon headlights
Daytime running LED lights
Front parking sensors
Reversing camera
High-resolution TFT trip computer

Premium Luxury

Price when new: $74,285 - $147,904

Price used: $9,700 - $24,900

The Premium Luxury on top of adding 19-inch alloys and metallic paint over the Premium introduces many comfort features such as: bi-xenon headlights, automatic headlight levelling and headlamp washers; reversing camera, soft grain leather and a 9-speaker sound system.

In addition to Luxury:

19-inch alloy wheels
Metallic paint
Electric mirrors – electrically folding and auto-dimming
Bi-xenon headlights
Integrated cornering lamps
Automatic headlight levelling
Headlamp washers
Reversing camera
Electrochromatic (auto-dimming) rear vision mirror
Burr Walnut veneer interior trim
Soft grain leather upholstery
Driver memory settings (seat, mirrors and steering wheel)
320W premium 9-speaker sound system
Digital sound processing
Floor mats

October 2011 update:

Daytime running LED lights
Reshaped bonnet
Triangular side vents
High-resolution TFT trip computer
10-speaker sound system

Portfolio

Price when new: $110,430 - $159,404

Price used: $12,200 - $34,950

The “top of the range” so to speak of the non-sporty XF range, the Portfolio adds larger alloys, park assist display, heated steering wheel, heated, ventilated and cooled seats, 440W 14-speaker Bower & Wilkins sound system, TV tuner, premium carpet mats and Suede headlining.

The 2011 update removed the Bower and Wilkins sound system and replaces it with a 600W 11-speaker Jaguar branded sound system.

In addition to Premium Luxury:

20-inch alloy wheels
Park assist display
Heated steering wheel
Heated, ventiled and cooled front seats
440W 14-speaker Bowers & Wilkins sound system
TV tuner
Deep-pile premium floor mats
Suede headlining

October 2011 update:

Daytime running LED lights
Reshaped bonnet
Triangular side vents
High-resolution TFT trip computer
600W 11-speaker premium sound system

75th Anniversary Edition

Price when new: $99,900 - $128,900

Price used: $9,500 - $20,200

The 75th Anniversary Edition is a limited edition model that added 20-inch alloys, quad exhaust finishers and iPod connectivity/control module.

In addition to Luxury:

20-inch ‘Senta’ alloy wheels
Quad-exhaust finishers
iPod control module”

SV8

Price when new: $173,170

Price used: $13,300 - $23,000

The sports-orientated SV8 adds a 4.2 litre supercharged V8 engine, JaguarDrive Control (Dynamic mode), adaptive dampers, tyre pressure monitoring, 14-way electrically adjustable seats, adjustable seat bolsters, voice cognition and premium floor mats.

In addition to Premium Luxury:

20-inch alloy wheels
JaguarDrive Control – Dyanmic mode
Active Technology Suspension
Adaptive dampers
Tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS)
Rich Oak veneer interior trim
14-way electrically adjustable front seats
Heated, ventiled and cooled front seats
Adjustable seat bolsters
440W 14-speaker Bowers & Wilkins sound system
TV tuner
Voice recognition
Premium floor mats

XF R

Price when new: $188,685 - $210,900

Price used: $19,500 - $59,450

Introduced in 2009, the XF R adds a sportier styling kit comprising of a larger grille and black mesh styling highlights, along with mechanical upgrades such as: faster ratio steering, adaptive dynamics and an electronically controlled rear differential.

In addition to SV8:

Larger grille
Black mesh styling highlights
Quad-exhuast outlets
Boot-lid spoiler
Faster ratio sterring
Adaptive dynamics
Active Differential Control ADC)
Electronically controlled rear differential

October 2011 update:

Daytime running LED lights
Reshaped bonnet
Triangular side vents
High-resolution TFT trip computer

XFR-S

Price when new: $221,545 - $221,685

Price used: $47,550 - $69,900

Introduced in 2013, the XFR-S adds larger front intakes, optimised exhaust system, a new torque convertor and 20-inch lightweight alloy wheels on top of the 5.0 litre supercharged V8 engine.

In addition to XF R:

Larger front intakes
Optimised exhaust system
New torque converter
20-inch lightweight alloy wheels

Should you buy a Jaguar XF? We think after reading this cheat sheet you know the answer, for most of us, no, of course not.

The range of common issues and faults is vast and unfortunately, reported regularly. Add to that that fixing these issues will most likely be expensive and for the majority of us, as beautiful and alluring as the XF is, it just doesn’t make financial sense.

However, for a few of us, if you really really want to, yes you should buy an XF.

For the true fans, cars like the XF aren’t about reliability or the cost of upkeep or logic, they’re about how a car makes you feel, the romance, the experience and this is where the Jaguar shines.

If you’re happy to accept that these are very far from perfect and you’re in the financial position to deal with the ongoing issues and the costs involved in fixing and maintaining them, sure buy one.

But the issue this car has is it’s competition as there is another car that does all of the lovely subjective stuff just as well as the XF, yet it’s proven for years that objectively, it is far more reliable and financially easier to live with.

And it’s not European, it’s Japanese, it’s the Lexus GS.

Should you buy a Jaguar XF? We think after reading this cheat sheet you know the answer, for most of us, no, of course not.

The range of common issues and faults is vast and unfortunately, reported regularly. Add to that that fixing these issues will most likely be expensive and for the majority of us, as beautiful and alluring as the XF is, it just doesn’t make financial sense.

However, for a few of us, if you really really want to, yes you should buy an XF.

For the true fans, cars like the XF aren’t about reliability or the cost of upkeep or logic, they’re about how a car makes you feel, the romance, the experience and this is where the Jaguar shines.

If you’re happy to accept that these are very far from perfect and you’re in the financial position to deal with the ongoing issues and the costs involved in fixing and maintaining them, sure buy one.

But the issue this car has is it’s competition as there is another car that does all of the lovely subjective stuff just as well as the XF, yet it’s proven for years that objectively, it is far more reliable and financially easier to live with.

And it’s not European, it’s Japanese, it’s the Lexus GS.

Should you buy a Jaguar XF? We think after reading this cheat sheet you know the answer, for most of us, no, of course not.

The range of common issues and faults is vast and unfortunately, reported regularly. Add to that that fixing these issues will most likely be expensive and for the majority of us, as beautiful and alluring as the XF is, it just doesn’t make financial sense.

However, for a few of us, if you really really want to, yes you should buy an XF.

For the true fans, cars like the XF aren’t about reliability or the cost of upkeep or logic, they’re about how a car makes you feel, the romance, the experience and this is where the Jaguar shines.

If you’re happy to accept that these are very far from perfect and you’re in the financial position to deal with the ongoing issues and the costs involved in fixing and maintaining them, sure buy one.

But the issue this car has is it’s competition as there is another car that does all of the lovely subjective stuff just as well as the XF, yet it’s proven for years that objectively, it is far more reliable and financially easier to live with.

And it’s not European, it’s Japanese, it’s the Lexus GS.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of May 12, 2022.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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