Likes

  • Excellent value for money.
  • Offers a no nonsense, tough and rugged alternative.
  • Mega tub one of the longest in class.
  • Good range of features and equipment.

Dislikes

  • Concerns regarding longevity and reliability.
  • Active safety features lacking.
  • Build quality can be hit and miss.
  • Dealer network and after sales complaints.

Stuff you should know

In contrast to the current trend of dual-cab Utes being purchased primarily as some sort of fashion accessory, the LDV T60 prioritises affordability and functionality, serving as a no-frills workhorse designed to efficiently accomplish your work and lifestyle tasks.

The LDV T60 made its debut in the Australian market in 2017 and remains a current model. In 2022, a mid-cycle update, referred to as the Max, not only revamped its aesthetics but also bolstered its performance with a new engine and enhanced its technological features.

In terms of trim specifications, the T60 lineup primarily comprises three models (Pro, Luxe and Max) within the dual-cab ute body style, although there were briefly available two-door cab chassis models.

Regarding its powerplant, LDV made a substantial change during the 2017 update, transforming the T60’s turbo diesel engine from one of the less potent options in its segment into one of the most powerful choices. Notably, the T60 has further evolved to become the first ute offering an all-electric powertrain option.

All T60 models come equipped with four-wheel drive, including high and low-range options. The Trailrider and Luxe models go a step further by introducing an on-demand rear differential lock for enhanced off-road capabilities.

In the context of dual-cab utes, the T60 presents a choice between different tub sizes, offering the standard option and the larger mega tub variant.

However, concerns have been raised regarding build quality and reliability, given that the T60 is manufactured in China. To address these concerns, let’s delve into more details.

What goes wrong

Exterior:

Firstly, rust has been a concern, which is somewhat surprising considering these vehicles are relatively new and are marketed as durable, versatile workhorses. Reports of rust problems have mainly centred around the body and underneath the vehicle. It appears that certain areas of the vehicle feature thin steel, and body shops have noted insufficient steel protection, which can lead to rust forming between panels. This is a significant concern.

However, it’s worth mentioning that LDV seems to have addressed these corrosion issues in more recent T60 models. From 2018 onward, LDV has offered a 10-year rust warranty. While most T60 owners haven’t reported rust problems, it’s possible that some may not be aware of rust forming between panels.

Another issue to be cautious about is the sale of “rust protection systems” by dealerships, which are often not very effective. In a similar vein

The issues with rust in the LDV T60 and the handling of the matter by the dealer can be seen in 2021 Queensland judicial filings here.

 

Interior:

Moving on to the interior, electronics-related problems appear to be the most prevalent source of frustration.

Numerous reports have emerged regarding infotainment system issues, such as screens turning off or displaying unusual colours, system resets, infotainment causing air conditioning to stop, and compatibility problems with both Apple and Android phones. Bluetooth connectivity can also be a headache for some owners. An annoying quirk mentioned by many owners is that the stereo volume tends to automatically increase to its highest setting each time the car is started or immediately after a phone call has finished.

The good news is that LDV and dealerships have replaced faulty infotainment systems in many cases, although some owners have reported the replacements can still encounter issues. Some owners may opt to budget for a high-quality aftermarket system to replace the problematic infotainment setup, which is disappointing for a relatively new vehicle.

Additional concerns include the blind-spot warning system occasionally triggering false alarms, instances of the vehicle going into a limp-home mode during light off-roading, cruise control failing to engage or disengaging during operation, and reverse sensors not deactivating when a trailer is attached. Many owners have voiced complaints about seat stitching coming undone, as well as the early onset of squeaks and rattles in the vehicle’s interior.

Furthermore, the rear seat sensor can be overly sensitive, often going off when seat belts are not fastened or when the seat is unoccupied. While this is intended as a safety feature, it can be rather annoying.

Lastly, similar to exterior issues, there are sporadic reports of other miscellaneous electrical problems, although they are not widespread.

Fortunately, most of these issues are still

Exterior:

Firstly, rust has been a concern, which is somewhat surprising considering these vehicles are relatively new and are marketed as durable, versatile workhorses. Reports of rust problems have mainly centred around the body and underneath the vehicle. It appears that certain areas of the vehicle feature thin steel, and body shops have noted insufficient steel protection, which can lead to rust forming between panels. This is a significant concern.

However, it’s worth mentioning that LDV seems to have addressed these corrosion issues in more recent T60 models. From 2018 onward, LDV has offered a 10-year rust warranty. While most T60 owners haven’t reported rust problems, it’s possible that some may not be aware of rust forming between panels.

Another issue to be cautious about is the sale of “rust protection systems” by dealerships, which are often not very effective. In a similar vein

The issues with rust in the LDV T60 and the handling of the matter by the dealer can be seen in 2021 Queensland judicial filings here.

 

Interior:

Moving on to the interior, electronics-related problems appear to be the most prevalent source of frustration.

Numerous reports have emerged regarding infotainment system issues, such as screens turning off or displaying unusual colours, system resets, infotainment causing air conditioning to stop, and compatibility problems with both Apple and Android phones. Bluetooth connectivity can also be a headache for some owners. An annoying quirk mentioned by many owners is that the stereo volume tends to automatically increase to its highest setting each time the car is started or immediately after a phone call has finished.

The good news is that LDV and dealerships have replaced faulty infotainment systems in many cases, although some owners have reported the replacements can still encounter issues. Some owners may opt to budget for a high-quality aftermarket system to replace the problematic infotainment setup, which is disappointing for a relatively new vehicle.

Additional concerns include the blind-spot warning system occasionally triggering false alarms, instances of the vehicle going into a limp-home mode during light off-roading, cruise control failing to engage or disengaging during operation, and reverse sensors not deactivating when a trailer is attached. Many owners have voiced complaints about seat stitching coming undone, as well as the early onset of squeaks and rattles in the vehicle’s interior.

Furthermore, the rear seat sensor can be overly sensitive, often going off when seat belts are not fastened or when the seat is unoccupied. While this is intended as a safety feature, it can be rather annoying.

Lastly, similar to exterior issues, there are sporadic reports of other miscellaneous electrical problems, although they are not widespread.

Fortunately, most of these issues are still covered under the full factory warranty, so LDV should address them. However, early models are now running out of warranty coverage, so if you are considering older T60 examples, be sure to thoroughly check and ensure that all components are in working order.

 

Mechanically:

Although manufactured by LDV (SAIC Motors), the T60 could be seen as a bit of a parts bin special and it’s a good example of how incestuous the automotive manufacturing industry can be.

Notably, its engine is provided by VM Motori, which is quite similar, albeit with slight distinctions, to the 2.8-litre turbo diesel found in models such as the Holden, Chevrolet Colorado, and Jeep Wrangler with safety electronics generally from Bosch. The T60 offers two transmission options – an 8-speed ZF or a 6-speed transmission by PUNCH Powertrain for automatic, while the manual is built by Hyundai DYMOS. Additionally, it incorporates a Borg Warner transfer case and an Eaton differential.

Let’s delve into some specifics regarding the VM Motori turbo diesel engine. Common issues include EGR valve failures, which can lead to oil leaking into the coolant system.

Turbo failures (a known issue across modern diesel engines), cracked intercoolers, and split intercooler pipes.

DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) problems are also observed, with undiagnosed split intercooler pipes often being a contributing factor.

Glow plug failures are relatively common, although not particularly expensive or challenging to rectify.

There have been emerging reports of oil leaks from the rear main seal. 

Furthermore, some drivers have experienced throttle lag, which can be mitigated with a throttle controller, although it’s worth noting that fitting one may lead to warranty claims being denied by dealerships.

Overheating can be an issue, sometimes attributed to faulty thermo fans or obstructions caused by bull bars and excessive accessories.

The wheel studs are noted to be relatively fragile, requiring careful tightening at 120Nm.

Turning our attention to the transmissions, the 8-speed ZF transmission used in later models stands out as the most reliable option, utilized in both rear-wheel and 4-wheel drive applications worldwide.

However, the 6-speed automatic transmission receives criticism for its harsh shifting and shuddering during downshifts, which seems to be a common issue inherent to the vehicle.

The concern is how this might evolve as these vehicles age and are no longer under warranty. The manual transmission’s primary complaint revolves around premature clutch failure, which typically isn’t covered by warranty since clutches are considered consumable items, and issues can arise even with relatively low mileage, sometimes as early as 40,000km.

In conclusion, the LDV T60 does exhibit some mechanical quirks and vulnerabilities, but overall, these issues are not markedly worse than those encountered in comparable vehicles within its class.

Exterior:

Firstly, rust has been a concern, which is somewhat surprising considering these vehicles are relatively new and are marketed as durable, versatile workhorses. Reports of rust problems have mainly centred around the body and underneath the vehicle. It appears that certain areas of the vehicle feature thin steel, and body shops have noted insufficient steel protection, which can lead to rust forming between panels. This is a significant concern.

However, it’s worth mentioning that LDV seems to have addressed these corrosion issues in more recent T60 models. From 2018 onward, LDV has offered a 10-year rust warranty. While most T60 owners haven’t reported rust problems, it’s possible that some may not be aware of rust forming between panels.

Another issue to be cautious about is the sale of “rust protection systems” by dealerships, which are often not very effective. In a similar vein

The issues with rust in the LDV T60 and the handling of the matter by the dealer can be seen in 2021 Queensland judicial filings here.

 

Interior:

Moving on to the interior, electronics-related problems appear to be the most prevalent source of frustration.

Numerous reports have emerged regarding infotainment system issues, such as screens turning off or displaying unusual colours, system resets, infotainment causing air conditioning to stop, and compatibility problems with both Apple and Android phones. Bluetooth connectivity can also be a headache for some owners. An annoying quirk mentioned by many owners is that the stereo volume tends to automatically increase to its highest setting each time the car is started or immediately after a phone call has finished.

The good news is that LDV and dealerships have replaced faulty infotainment systems in many cases, although some owners have reported the replacements can still encounter issues. Some owners may opt to budget for a high-quality aftermarket system to replace the problematic infotainment setup, which is disappointing for a relatively new vehicle.

Additional concerns include the blind-spot warning system occasionally triggering false alarms, instances of the vehicle going into a limp-home mode during light off-roading, cruise control failing to engage or disengaging during operation, and reverse sensors not deactivating when a trailer is attached. Many owners have voiced complaints about seat stitching coming undone, as well as the early onset of squeaks and rattles in the vehicle’s interior.

Furthermore, the rear seat sensor can be overly sensitive, often going off when seat belts are not fastened or when the seat is unoccupied. While this is intended as a safety feature, it can be rather annoying.

Lastly, similar to exterior issues, there are sporadic reports of other miscellaneous electrical problems, although they are not widespread.

Fortunately, most of these issues are still covered under the full factory warranty, so LDV should address them. However, early models are now running out of warranty coverage, so if you are considering older T60 examples, be sure to thoroughly check and ensure that all components are in working order.

 

Mechanically:

Although manufactured by LDV (SAIC Motors), the T60 could be seen as a bit of a parts bin special and it’s a good example of how incestuous the automotive manufacturing industry can be.

Notably, its engine is provided by VM Motori, which is quite similar, albeit with slight distinctions, to the 2.8-litre turbo diesel found in models such as the Holden, Chevrolet Colorado, and Jeep Wrangler with safety electronics generally from Bosch. The T60 offers two transmission options – an 8-speed ZF or a 6-speed transmission by PUNCH Powertrain for automatic, while the manual is built by Hyundai DYMOS. Additionally, it incorporates a Borg Warner transfer case and an Eaton differential.

Let’s delve into some specifics regarding the VM Motori turbo diesel engine. Common issues include EGR valve failures, which can lead to oil leaking into the coolant system.

Turbo failures (a known issue across modern diesel engines), cracked intercoolers, and split intercooler pipes.

DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) problems are also observed, with undiagnosed split intercooler pipes often being a contributing factor.

Glow plug failures are relatively common, although not particularly expensive or challenging to rectify.

There have been emerging reports of oil leaks from the rear main seal. 

Furthermore, some drivers have experienced throttle lag, which can be mitigated with a throttle controller, although it’s worth noting that fitting one may lead to warranty claims being denied by dealerships.

Overheating can be an issue, sometimes attributed to faulty thermo fans or obstructions caused by bull bars and excessive accessories.

The wheel studs are noted to be relatively fragile, requiring careful tightening at 120Nm.

Turning our attention to the transmissions, the 8-speed ZF transmission used in later models stands out as the most reliable option, utilized in both rear-wheel and 4-wheel drive applications worldwide.

However, the 6-speed automatic transmission receives criticism for its harsh shifting and shuddering during downshifts, which seems to be a common issue inherent to the vehicle.

The concern is how this might evolve as these vehicles age and are no longer under warranty. The manual transmission’s primary complaint revolves around premature clutch failure, which typically isn’t covered by warranty since clutches are considered consumable items, and issues can arise even with relatively low mileage, sometimes as early as 40,000km.

In conclusion, the LDV T60 does exhibit some mechanical quirks and vulnerabilities, but overall, these issues are not markedly worse than those encountered in comparable vehicles within its class.

Should you buy it?

When you consider the price point of the LDV T60 compared to similar utes on the used market, mainly the likes of the Mitsubishi Triton, it’s difficult for us to recommend the LDV T60. To the point where if you’re after a straight answer, we would say, no, don’t buy one.

But, if you’re after a cheap, well-specced and safe ute, and you find one in impeccable condition, with plenty of warranty to cover the issues, you’ll probably be fine owning one. But, just know you’re not buying a ute that comes even close to its competitors.

Given the used market has closed the gap to many other utes, making the jump to something like an MQ Mitsubishi Triton would be our recommendation. The Triton is just as capable, has fewer reported issues and the aftersales support alone (or at least how poor the LDV’s is), might just be enough to make you walk past the T60. However, the big caveat to recommending the Triton, is it didn’t come with similar active safety tech to the LDV until the updated MR mode, which you’ll struggle to get for the same money as a T60.

But, if active safety isn’t a major concern to you, there are very few reasons why you should drop your hard-earned cash on the T60

When you consider the price point of the LDV T60 compared to similar utes on the used market, mainly the likes of the Mitsubishi Triton, it’s difficult for us to recommend the LDV T60. To the point where if you’re after a straight answer, we would say, no, don’t buy one.

But, if you’re after a cheap, well-specced and safe ute, and you find one in impeccable condition, with plenty of warranty to cover the issues, you’ll probably be fine owning one. But, just know you’re not buying a ute that comes even close to its competitors.

Given the used market has closed the gap to many other utes, making the jump to something like an MQ Mitsubishi Triton would be our recommendation. The Triton is just as capable, has fewer reported issues and the aftersales support alone (or at least how poor the LDV’s is), might just be enough to make you walk past the T60. However, the big caveat to recommending the Triton, is it didn’t come with similar active safety tech to the LDV until the updated MR mode, which you’ll struggle to get for the same money as a T60.

But, if active safety isn’t a major concern to you, there are very few reasons why you should drop your hard-earned cash on the T60

Should you buy it?

When you consider the price point of the LDV T60 compared to similar utes on the used market, mainly the likes of the Mitsubishi Triton, it’s difficult for us to recommend the LDV T60. To the point where if you’re after a straight answer, we would say, no, don’t buy one.

But, if you’re after a cheap, well-specced and safe ute, and you find one in impeccable condition, with plenty of warranty to cover the issues, you’ll probably be fine owning one. But, just know you’re not buying a ute that comes even close to its competitors.

Given the used market has closed the gap to many other utes, making the jump to something like an MQ Mitsubishi Triton would be our recommendation. The Triton is just as capable, has fewer reported issues and the aftersales support alone (or at least how poor the LDV’s is), might just be enough to make you walk past the T60. However, the big caveat to recommending the Triton, is it didn’t come with similar active safety tech to the LDV until the updated MR mode, which you’ll struggle to get for the same money as a T60.

But, if active safety isn’t a major concern to you, there are very few reasons why you should drop your hard-earned cash on the T60

Need help with finance?

What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

Per week*

8.49%

Comparison rate p.a#

Models, pricing & features

LDV T60-3

PRO

Price when new: $25,253

Price used: $15,100 - $17,100

Equipment

  • 12V Socket(s) – Auxiliary
  • 16″ Alloy Wheels
  • 6 Speaker Stereo
  • ABS (Antilock Brakes)
  • Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt only
  • Air Conditioning
  • Airbag – Driver
  • Airbag – Passenger
  • Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
  • Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
  • Armrest – Front Centre (Shared)
  • Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
  • Audio – MP3 Decoder
  • Bedliner
  • Bluetooth System
  • Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Partial
  • Brake Assist
  • Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
  • Control – Electronic Stability
  • Control – Hill Descent
  • Control – Rollover Stability
  • Control – Traction
  • Cruise Control
  • Daytime Running Lamps – LED
  • Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
  • Disc Brakes Rear Solid
  • EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
  • Engine Immobiliser
  • Fog Lamps – Front
  • Grille – Black
  • Headlamps – Active (Cornering/steering)
  • Headlamps – Electric Level Adjustment
  • Headlamps – LED
  • Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
  • Hill Holder
  • Independent Front Suspension
  • Lane Departure Warning
  • Mudflaps – front
  • Power Door Mirrors – Heated
  • Power Steering
  • Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
  • Rear View Mirror – Manual Anti-Glare
  • Seat – Height Adjustable Driver
  • Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
  • Side Steps
  • Spare Wheel – Full Size Alloy Wheel
  • Tray
  • Trim – Cloth
  • Trip Computer
  • Tyre Pressure Sensor
  • Warning – Driver Fatigue

LUXE

Price when new: $34,726

Price used: $21,500 - $24,000

Adds

  • Air Cond. – Climate Control
  • Central Locking – Key Proximity
  • Chrome Door Handles – Exterior
  • Chrome Door Mirrors
  • Chrome Grille
  • Diff lock(s)
  • Electric Seats – 1st Row (Front)
  • Heated Seats – 1st Row
  • Keyless Start:- Key/FOB Proximity related
  • Leather Seats – Partial
  • Leather Steering Wheel
  • Power Door Mirrors – Folding
  • Rear View Mirror – Electric Anti Glare
  • Sports Bar
  • Starter Button

Trailrider

Price when new: $38,937

Price used: $26,300 - $29,100

Adds

  • 19″ Alloy Wheels
  • Decals
  • Nudge Bar – Front
  • Painted – Wheels
  • Spare Wheel – Space Saver/Temporary
  • Tonneau Cover – Flat Hard

LUXE Mega Tub

Price when new: $36,831

Price used: $24,400 - $27,000

Adds

  • Suspension – Leaf

Trailrider 2

Price when new: $39,990

Price used: $28,400 - $31,200

Adds

  • Sunglass Holder

Max PRO

Price when new: $35,779

Price used: $27,200 - $29,800

Adds

  • Cargo Liner
  • Driver Attention Detection
  • Fog Lamp/s – Rear
  • Matt Finish – Exterior Highlights
  • Seat – Drivers Lumbar Adjustment Manual
  • Seat – Height Adjustable Passenger
  • Seat – Passenger Lumbar Adjustment Manual
  • Spare Wheel – Full Size Steel
  • Towing – Latch/Hook Front
  • USB Socket(s) – Charging

Max LUXE

Price when new: $40,516

Price used: $31,300 - $34,200

Adds

  • Electric Seat – Drivers
  • Electric Seat – Passenger
  • Gloss Finish – Exterior Highlights

Max LUXE Mega Tub

Price when new: $49,463

Price used: $0

Tech specs

Body Styles

  • 2 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Utility

Engine Specs

  • 2.8 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 110kW / 360Nm (PRO 2017 – 2021, LUXE 2017 – 2021, Trailrider 2019, LUXE Mega Tub 2019 – 2021)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 120kW / 375Nm (Trailrider 2 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder twin turbo diesel, 160kW / 500Nm (Max PRO 2021 – 2022, Max LUXE 2021 – 2022, Max LUXE Mega Tub 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Trailrider 2, Max PRO, Max LUXE)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Trailrider 2)
  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)

Fuel Consumption

  • 8.2 – 12.1 / 100km (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub)
  • 7.5 – 10.2 / 100km (Trailrider 2)
  • 7.9 – 11.5 / 100km (Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)

Length

  • 0mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 5365mm – 5680mm (4 door Utility)

Width

  • 1900mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1809mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 1809mm – 1887mm (4 door Utility)

Wheelbase

  • 3155mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 3155mm – 3470mm (4 door Utility)

Kerb Weight

  • 1630kg – 1720kg (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • Unknown kg – 2150kg (4 door Utility)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 3000kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • 5 stars, tested 2017 (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)
  • Not tested (Trailrider 2)

Body Styles

  • 2 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Utility

Engine Specs

  • 2.8 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 110kW / 360Nm (PRO 2017 – 2021, LUXE 2017 – 2021, Trailrider 2019, LUXE Mega Tub 2019 – 2021)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 120kW / 375Nm (Trailrider 2 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder twin turbo diesel, 160kW / 500Nm (Max PRO 2021 – 2022, Max LUXE 2021 – 2022, Max LUXE Mega Tub 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Trailrider 2, Max PRO, Max LUXE)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Trailrider 2)
  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)

Fuel Consumption

  • 8.2 – 12.1 / 100km (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub)
  • 7.5 – 10.2 / 100km (Trailrider 2)
  • 7.9 – 11.5 / 100km (Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)

Length

  • 0mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 5365mm – 5680mm (4 door Utility)

Width

  • 1900mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1809mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 1809mm – 1887mm (4 door Utility)

Wheelbase

  • 3155mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 3155mm – 3470mm (4 door Utility)

Kerb Weight

  • 1630kg – 1720kg (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • Unknown kg – 2150kg (4 door Utility)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 3000kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • 5 stars, tested 2017 (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)
  • Not tested (Trailrider 2)

Body Styles

  • 2 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Utility

Engine Specs

  • 2.8 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 110kW / 360Nm (PRO 2017 – 2021, LUXE 2017 – 2021, Trailrider 2019, LUXE Mega Tub 2019 – 2021)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 120kW / 375Nm (Trailrider 2 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder twin turbo diesel, 160kW / 500Nm (Max PRO 2021 – 2022, Max LUXE 2021 – 2022, Max LUXE Mega Tub 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Trailrider 2, Max PRO, Max LUXE)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Trailrider 2)
  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)

Fuel Consumption

  • 8.2 – 12.1 / 100km (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub)
  • 7.5 – 10.2 / 100km (Trailrider 2)
  • 7.9 – 11.5 / 100km (Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)

Length

  • 0mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 5365mm – 5680mm (4 door Utility)

Width

  • 1900mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1809mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 1809mm – 1887mm (4 door Utility)

Wheelbase

  • 3155mm (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 3155mm – 3470mm (4 door Utility)

Kerb Weight

  • 1630kg – 1720kg (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • Unknown kg – 2150kg (4 door Utility)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 3000kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • 5 stars, tested 2017 (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)
  • Not tested (Trailrider 2)

Warranty & servicing

Warranty

  • 5 years / 130,000 km (PRO, LUXE, Trailrider, LUXE Mega Tub, Trailrider 2, Max PRO, Max LUXE)
  • 7 years / 200,000 km (Max PRO, Max LUXE, Max LUXE Mega Tub)

Servicing

  • 15,000 km / 12 months (All Models)

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Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of Nov 21, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

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