Likes

  • Immense reputation for reliability.
  • Arguably the industry standard in this class.
  • Huge range to choose from on the used market.
  • One of, if not the largest, support network in this category.

Dislikes

  • Toyota tax results in questionable value for money.
  • Many on the used market have been ruined and are well past their best.
  • Certain OEM parts can be expensive.
  • Petrol models can be extremely thirsty.

Stuff you should know

  • The Toyota LandCruiser Prado J120 generation, produced from 2003 to 2009, underwent several revisions during its production span. The first version, known as the Mark I (120-I), was available from 2003 to 2004. The Mark II (120-II) followed from 2004 to 2006, and the final version, Mark III (120-III), was produced from 2006 to 2009. Each iteration brought about changes and improvements to the vehicle.
  • In terms of engine options available in Australia, the J120 generation initially offered a variety of choices. Buyers could select from a 2.7-litre inline-4 petrol engine, a 4.0-litre V6 petrol engine, and a 3.0-litre turbo-diesel inline-4 engine. However, the 2.7-litre four-cylinder petrol engine was discontinued with the first update. The second update introduced the 1KD-FTV engine, replacing the previous 3.0-litre turbo diesel.
  • Mechanically, the J120 Prado features a permanent four-wheel-drive system equipped with a two-speed transfer case. Depending on the model and the region, some versions include a torsion centre differential with open front and rear differentials, utilising traction control. Other models offer a lockable centre and rear differential for more challenging off-road conditions.
  • The J120 Prado shares its suspension components with the Hilux Surf, 4Runner, and FJ Cruiser from the same era.
  • This commonality in parts can be beneficial for maintenance and repairs. Additionally, for international markets, the J120 Prado serves as the basis for the Lexus GX 470. The Lexus GX 470, in contrast, provides additional luxury features, a more refined driving experience, and is powered by Toyota’s 4.7-litre 2UZ-FE V8 engine.
  • In Australia, the Prado was available in four trim levels: GX, GXL, VX, and Grande. Special editions such as the Pilbara (2005), GX Limited (2006), and the Standard (a 5-seat variant from 2007) were also offered.
  • The extensive aftermarket scene means that used Prados often come with a variety of modifications, which can lead to unique differences between individual vehicles. However, this can also introduce potential issues, which will be discussed in detail later.
  • When considering the J120 Prado’s offerings and its current used market pricing, it competes with vehicles like the Mitsubishi Pajero, Ford Everest, Isuzu MUX, Nissan Pathfinder, and even the Land Rover Discovery 4.
  • Despite Toyota’s strong reputation for reliability, especially with the LandCruiser models, the 120 Series LandCruiser Prado is now around 20 years old. This age brings potential problems, and prospective buyers should be aware of common issues associated with these vehicles. Read on to learn more about what to watch out for.

What goes wrong

Exterior:

  • The exterior of the J120 generation Toyota LandCruiser Prado, particularly in the Australian market, has a few notable issues. One common problem is with the rear door hinges. Due to the weight of the door and the spare wheel, the rear door hinges can wear out over time, causing the door to sag. In rare cases, the hinge can crack at the door seam, which may require welding to fix. Most owners, however, will only need to replace the hinges and realign the door.
  • Another frequent complaint involves the paint quality. Issues such as peeling, cracking, and fading are particularly common in the white pearlescent models, which is a problem shared by many white Toyotas of this era. This issue seems to affect earlier models more, as later examples often do not have these paint problems. However, even later models have been noted for having relatively thin paint, which is concerning for a vehicle designed for off-road use. Additionally, any stickers applied to the paint can become difficult to remove if they get baked on by the sun.
  • Rust is another concern, especially for owners in colder climates with salted roads. In Australia, rust is less of an issue, but it can still occur, particularly behind the rear cargo door seals and on the chassis. Chassis corrosion can be severe and potentially render the vehicle unusable. Therefore, it’s essential to thoroughly inspect the undercarriage for signs of rust, abuse, and damage, regardless of the vehicle’s location. Obtaining a detailed vehicle history report is also crucial to ensure there are no hidden issues such as previous write-offs, outstanding finance, or theft records. For more information, you can visit ReDriven.com or use the link provided.
  • The sunroof, if equipped, can also cause problems. Clogged drains can lead to water leaking down the A-pillar and soaking the ECU in the kick panels, resulting in intermittent electrical problems. It’s important to check the kick panel areas for moisture if you’re experiencing electrical issues. Water can also leak through worn rubber belts at the bottom of the side windows, leading to wetness in the cargo area and eventually causing rust.
  • The OEM brakes on the Prado can warp and wear out easily. It’s advisable to avoid heavy brake usage on extended downhill runs or while sitting in traffic after prolonged brake use. Additionally, the Grande and Lexus variants with adjustable airbag suspension can face issues with the airbag system, such as blown airbags and other hardware failures. Many owners opt to replace the airbag suspension with a quality aftermarket spring setup to avoid these problems.
  • Lastly, it’s important to check any accessories that are bolted to the vehicle. Ensure that they are quality

Exterior:

  • The exterior of the J120 generation Toyota LandCruiser Prado, particularly in the Australian market, has a few notable issues. One common problem is with the rear door hinges. Due to the weight of the door and the spare wheel, the rear door hinges can wear out over time, causing the door to sag. In rare cases, the hinge can crack at the door seam, which may require welding to fix. Most owners, however, will only need to replace the hinges and realign the door.
  • Another frequent complaint involves the paint quality. Issues such as peeling, cracking, and fading are particularly common in the white pearlescent models, which is a problem shared by many white Toyotas of this era. This issue seems to affect earlier models more, as later examples often do not have these paint problems. However, even later models have been noted for having relatively thin paint, which is concerning for a vehicle designed for off-road use. Additionally, any stickers applied to the paint can become difficult to remove if they get baked on by the sun.
  • Rust is another concern, especially for owners in colder climates with salted roads. In Australia, rust is less of an issue, but it can still occur, particularly behind the rear cargo door seals and on the chassis. Chassis corrosion can be severe and potentially render the vehicle unusable. Therefore, it’s essential to thoroughly inspect the undercarriage for signs of rust, abuse, and damage, regardless of the vehicle’s location. Obtaining a detailed vehicle history report is also crucial to ensure there are no hidden issues such as previous write-offs, outstanding finance, or theft records. For more information, you can visit ReDriven.com or use the link provided.
  • The sunroof, if equipped, can also cause problems. Clogged drains can lead to water leaking down the A-pillar and soaking the ECU in the kick panels, resulting in intermittent electrical problems. It’s important to check the kick panel areas for moisture if you’re experiencing electrical issues. Water can also leak through worn rubber belts at the bottom of the side windows, leading to wetness in the cargo area and eventually causing rust.
  • The OEM brakes on the Prado can warp and wear out easily. It’s advisable to avoid heavy brake usage on extended downhill runs or while sitting in traffic after prolonged brake use. Additionally, the Grande and Lexus variants with adjustable airbag suspension can face issues with the airbag system, such as blown airbags and other hardware failures. Many owners opt to replace the airbag suspension with a quality aftermarket spring setup to avoid these problems.
  • Lastly, it’s important to check any accessories that are bolted to the vehicle. Ensure that they are quality components, have been fitted correctly, and are functioning properly. Many owners have found that accessories on used Prados often do not work as intended.

Interior:

  • Inside the J120 Prado, the dashboard is prone to cracking, a very common issue. Owners generally recommend replacing the entire dashboard rather than attempting to repair it, as repairs tend to fail. Replacement costs can exceed $2000.
  • HVAC problems are another concern, with issues reported in blend servos and condensers. Although not extremely common, air conditioning and heating problems do occur. When considering a purchase, test the air conditioning on all settings and listen for sounds resembling a skipping CD player, which may indicate a failing actuator servo motor. Fortunately, this is typically an easy and affordable fix.
  • Some owners have reported issues with the sun visors falling down. For these and other issues, owner groups can be a valuable resource for tutorials and fixes. The leather on the steering wheel and seats in higher-spec models can also wear badly, degrading and flaking off. Additionally, seat bolster foam can collapse over time. Reupholstering is often the best solution for these problems.
  • In summary, while the J120 LandCruiser Prado is known for its reliability and off-road capabilities, it is important to be aware of these common exterior and interior issues when considering a used model. Thorough inspections and a vehicle history report are essential steps in ensuring a good purchase.

Mechanically:

1KZ-TE: 3.0-Litre Turbo-Diesel Inline-4

  • The early 1KZ-TE engine in the Australian market J120 generation Toyota LandCruiser Prado features an old-school fuel pump and separate injectors, resulting in a simpler injection system that is easier and cheaper to repair.
  • However, to maintain its longevity, it is recommended to replace the injectors every 150,000 kilometres, and certainly no more than 200,000 kilometres.
  • The cooling system must be flawless to prevent overheating, as overheating can cause the cylinder head to crack, necessitating an expensive head replacement.
  • In addition to the injectors, glow plugs should be replaced every 100,000 kilometres.
  • Another critical maintenance aspect is ensuring the oil pickup is not blocked, which can happen due to poor servicing or simply over time. A blocked oil pickup leads to oil starvation and, ultimately, engine failure.

1KD-FTV: 3.0-Litre Turbo-Diesel Inline-4

  • The later 1KD-FTV engine also suffers from issues with blocked oil pickups. The earlier versions of this engine had an injector design flaw where leaking injector seals could cause carbon buildup in the crankcase, leading to a blocked oil strainer and oil pressure issues, ultimately killing the engine. Although later models revised the seal design to reduce leakage, the issue can still occur.
  • Injectors for the 1KD-FTV are expensive and should be replaced every 200,000 kilometres to ensure engine longevity.
  • These engines can be prone to piston cracking, which is often due to a design flaw rather than injector issues. Extreme towing and modifications can exacerbate this problem.
  • While turbos on these engines are generally reliable, they can sometimes have complications.
  • Servicing these engines includes checking a small MAP sensor filter, which, if blocked or leaking, can cause incorrect air-fuel ratios and long-term engine damage.
  • The timing belt should be replaced every 150,000 kilometres or seven years. For prospective buyers unsure of the service history, inspecting the oil pickup by removing the sump is advisable.

1GR-FE: 4.0-Litre Petrol V6

  • The 1GR-FE engine is known for its reliability and features a timing chain instead of a timing belt, reducing the likelihood of issues unless it has a poor service history.
  • Engines with missed services can suffer from carbon buildup in the sump, leading to a blocked oil pickup and engine failure.
  • With age, these engines may develop head gasket complications, especially if the cooling system has not been properly maintained. The multi-layer steel gasket can rust, and the coolant ports in the head can erode, mimicking head gasket issues. Although not common, this is something to watch for.
  • The radiator’s plastic outlet can fatigue over time and break, causing coolant loss.
  • The coolant temperature sensor setup may not immediately alert you to this loss, so it’s crucial to replace the radiator if the top part is brown.

Transmission

  • The transmissions in all models of the J120 generation LandCruiser Prado are robust.
  • Higher mileage transmissions may experience issues with bearings and synchros, but they generally hold up well if properly serviced.
  • Automatic transmissions, however, do not handle heavy loads well and tend to overheat.
  • For those who tow or engage in extreme four-wheel driving, an oil cooler is essential to prevent overheating and extend the transmission’s life.

General Maintenance and Advice

  • Regardless of the engine and transmission combination, regular servicing is crucial for these vehicles.
  • As the LandCruiser Prado ages, some owners may neglect servicing, especially given the vehicle’s affordability.
  • However, meticulous servicing is necessary to achieve the high mileage these vehicles are capable of, potentially reaching three, four, or even five hundred thousand kilometres.
  • When purchasing a used LandCruiser Prado, be wary of previous owners’ modifications.
  • Poorly executed modifications can lead to significant problems, so it’s essential to ensure any mods were done correctly.

Exterior:

  • The exterior of the J120 generation Toyota LandCruiser Prado, particularly in the Australian market, has a few notable issues. One common problem is with the rear door hinges. Due to the weight of the door and the spare wheel, the rear door hinges can wear out over time, causing the door to sag. In rare cases, the hinge can crack at the door seam, which may require welding to fix. Most owners, however, will only need to replace the hinges and realign the door.
  • Another frequent complaint involves the paint quality. Issues such as peeling, cracking, and fading are particularly common in the white pearlescent models, which is a problem shared by many white Toyotas of this era. This issue seems to affect earlier models more, as later examples often do not have these paint problems. However, even later models have been noted for having relatively thin paint, which is concerning for a vehicle designed for off-road use. Additionally, any stickers applied to the paint can become difficult to remove if they get baked on by the sun.
  • Rust is another concern, especially for owners in colder climates with salted roads. In Australia, rust is less of an issue, but it can still occur, particularly behind the rear cargo door seals and on the chassis. Chassis corrosion can be severe and potentially render the vehicle unusable. Therefore, it’s essential to thoroughly inspect the undercarriage for signs of rust, abuse, and damage, regardless of the vehicle’s location. Obtaining a detailed vehicle history report is also crucial to ensure there are no hidden issues such as previous write-offs, outstanding finance, or theft records. For more information, you can visit ReDriven.com or use the link provided.
  • The sunroof, if equipped, can also cause problems. Clogged drains can lead to water leaking down the A-pillar and soaking the ECU in the kick panels, resulting in intermittent electrical problems. It’s important to check the kick panel areas for moisture if you’re experiencing electrical issues. Water can also leak through worn rubber belts at the bottom of the side windows, leading to wetness in the cargo area and eventually causing rust.
  • The OEM brakes on the Prado can warp and wear out easily. It’s advisable to avoid heavy brake usage on extended downhill runs or while sitting in traffic after prolonged brake use. Additionally, the Grande and Lexus variants with adjustable airbag suspension can face issues with the airbag system, such as blown airbags and other hardware failures. Many owners opt to replace the airbag suspension with a quality aftermarket spring setup to avoid these problems.
  • Lastly, it’s important to check any accessories that are bolted to the vehicle. Ensure that they are quality components, have been fitted correctly, and are functioning properly. Many owners have found that accessories on used Prados often do not work as intended.

Interior:

  • Inside the J120 Prado, the dashboard is prone to cracking, a very common issue. Owners generally recommend replacing the entire dashboard rather than attempting to repair it, as repairs tend to fail. Replacement costs can exceed $2000.
  • HVAC problems are another concern, with issues reported in blend servos and condensers. Although not extremely common, air conditioning and heating problems do occur. When considering a purchase, test the air conditioning on all settings and listen for sounds resembling a skipping CD player, which may indicate a failing actuator servo motor. Fortunately, this is typically an easy and affordable fix.
  • Some owners have reported issues with the sun visors falling down. For these and other issues, owner groups can be a valuable resource for tutorials and fixes. The leather on the steering wheel and seats in higher-spec models can also wear badly, degrading and flaking off. Additionally, seat bolster foam can collapse over time. Reupholstering is often the best solution for these problems.
  • In summary, while the J120 LandCruiser Prado is known for its reliability and off-road capabilities, it is important to be aware of these common exterior and interior issues when considering a used model. Thorough inspections and a vehicle history report are essential steps in ensuring a good purchase.

Mechanically:

1KZ-TE: 3.0-Litre Turbo-Diesel Inline-4

  • The early 1KZ-TE engine in the Australian market J120 generation Toyota LandCruiser Prado features an old-school fuel pump and separate injectors, resulting in a simpler injection system that is easier and cheaper to repair.
  • However, to maintain its longevity, it is recommended to replace the injectors every 150,000 kilometres, and certainly no more than 200,000 kilometres.
  • The cooling system must be flawless to prevent overheating, as overheating can cause the cylinder head to crack, necessitating an expensive head replacement.
  • In addition to the injectors, glow plugs should be replaced every 100,000 kilometres.
  • Another critical maintenance aspect is ensuring the oil pickup is not blocked, which can happen due to poor servicing or simply over time. A blocked oil pickup leads to oil starvation and, ultimately, engine failure.

1KD-FTV: 3.0-Litre Turbo-Diesel Inline-4

  • The later 1KD-FTV engine also suffers from issues with blocked oil pickups. The earlier versions of this engine had an injector design flaw where leaking injector seals could cause carbon buildup in the crankcase, leading to a blocked oil strainer and oil pressure issues, ultimately killing the engine. Although later models revised the seal design to reduce leakage, the issue can still occur.
  • Injectors for the 1KD-FTV are expensive and should be replaced every 200,000 kilometres to ensure engine longevity.
  • These engines can be prone to piston cracking, which is often due to a design flaw rather than injector issues. Extreme towing and modifications can exacerbate this problem.
  • While turbos on these engines are generally reliable, they can sometimes have complications.
  • Servicing these engines includes checking a small MAP sensor filter, which, if blocked or leaking, can cause incorrect air-fuel ratios and long-term engine damage.
  • The timing belt should be replaced every 150,000 kilometres or seven years. For prospective buyers unsure of the service history, inspecting the oil pickup by removing the sump is advisable.

1GR-FE: 4.0-Litre Petrol V6

  • The 1GR-FE engine is known for its reliability and features a timing chain instead of a timing belt, reducing the likelihood of issues unless it has a poor service history.
  • Engines with missed services can suffer from carbon buildup in the sump, leading to a blocked oil pickup and engine failure.
  • With age, these engines may develop head gasket complications, especially if the cooling system has not been properly maintained. The multi-layer steel gasket can rust, and the coolant ports in the head can erode, mimicking head gasket issues. Although not common, this is something to watch for.
  • The radiator’s plastic outlet can fatigue over time and break, causing coolant loss.
  • The coolant temperature sensor setup may not immediately alert you to this loss, so it’s crucial to replace the radiator if the top part is brown.

Transmission

  • The transmissions in all models of the J120 generation LandCruiser Prado are robust.
  • Higher mileage transmissions may experience issues with bearings and synchros, but they generally hold up well if properly serviced.
  • Automatic transmissions, however, do not handle heavy loads well and tend to overheat.
  • For those who tow or engage in extreme four-wheel driving, an oil cooler is essential to prevent overheating and extend the transmission’s life.

General Maintenance and Advice

  • Regardless of the engine and transmission combination, regular servicing is crucial for these vehicles.
  • As the LandCruiser Prado ages, some owners may neglect servicing, especially given the vehicle’s affordability.
  • However, meticulous servicing is necessary to achieve the high mileage these vehicles are capable of, potentially reaching three, four, or even five hundred thousand kilometres.
  • When purchasing a used LandCruiser Prado, be wary of previous owners’ modifications.
  • Poorly executed modifications can lead to significant problems, so it’s essential to ensure any mods were done correctly.

Should you buy it?

The 120 Series Toyota LandCruiser Prado, while renowned for its durability and off-road capabilities, comes with some considerations that might make potential buyers think twice. Firstly, these vehicles are aging, and the cost of OEM parts can be quite high. Many Prados on the used market are well past their prime, and the notorious “Toyota tax” might lead you to question the value for money you’re getting.

However, if you find the right example and ensure it meets all the critical pre-purchase criteria, these potential negatives can become insignificant. With proper maintenance, a well-kept 120 Series Prado can remain a robust and reliable vehicle for many years. Despite the higher prices often seen with used Toyotas, the 120 Series Prado can still offer some of the best value for money in its category.

For those on a budget, the 120 Series Prado is one of the best 4×4 tourers available. It’s not perfect, but it offers a unique combination of reliability, capability, and value that’s hard to beat in this segment.

The 120 Series Toyota LandCruiser Prado, while renowned for its durability and off-road capabilities, comes with some considerations that might make potential buyers think twice. Firstly, these vehicles are aging, and the cost of OEM parts can be quite high. Many Prados on the used market are well past their prime, and the notorious “Toyota tax” might lead you to question the value for money you’re getting.

However, if you find the right example and ensure it meets all the critical pre-purchase criteria, these potential negatives can become insignificant. With proper maintenance, a well-kept 120 Series Prado can remain a robust and reliable vehicle for many years. Despite the higher prices often seen with used Toyotas, the 120 Series Prado can still offer some of the best value for money in its category.

For those on a budget, the 120 Series Prado is one of the best 4×4 tourers available. It’s not perfect, but it offers a unique combination of reliability, capability, and value that’s hard to beat in this segment.

Should you buy it?

The 120 Series Toyota LandCruiser Prado, while renowned for its durability and off-road capabilities, comes with some considerations that might make potential buyers think twice. Firstly, these vehicles are aging, and the cost of OEM parts can be quite high. Many Prados on the used market are well past their prime, and the notorious “Toyota tax” might lead you to question the value for money you’re getting.

However, if you find the right example and ensure it meets all the critical pre-purchase criteria, these potential negatives can become insignificant. With proper maintenance, a well-kept 120 Series Prado can remain a robust and reliable vehicle for many years. Despite the higher prices often seen with used Toyotas, the 120 Series Prado can still offer some of the best value for money in its category.

For those on a budget, the 120 Series Prado is one of the best 4×4 tourers available. It’s not perfect, but it offers a unique combination of reliability, capability, and value that’s hard to beat in this segment.

Need help with finance?

What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

Per week*

8.49%

Comparison rate p.a#

Models, pricing & features

Toyota Prado-6

GX

Price when new: $38,990

Price used: $6,100 - $8,300

Equipment

  • 6 Speaker Stereo
  • Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt only
  • Airbag – Driver
  • Airbag – Passenger
  • Armrest – Rear Centre (Shared)
  • CD Player
  • Calipers – Front 4 Spot
  • Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
  • Centre Differential
  • Coil Springs
  • Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
  • Disc Brakes Rear Ventilated
  • Dual Range Transmission
  • Engine Immobiliser
  • Guard – Sump
  • Headrests – Integrated 2nd Row
  • Independent Front Suspension
  • Intermittent Wipers – Variable
  • Limited Slip Diff
  • Mudflaps – front
  • Mudflaps – rear
  • Power Door Mirrors
  • Power Steering
  • Power Windows – Front & Rear
  • Rear Wiper/Washer
  • Remote Boot/Hatch Release
  • Remote Fuel Lid Release
  • Spare Wheel – Rear Mounted
  • Tacho

GXL

Price when new: $52,360

Price used: $8,400 - $10,800

Adds

  • 17″ Alloy Wheels
  • ABS (Antilock Brakes)
  • Air Conditioning
  • Body Colour – Bumpers
  • Body Side Mouldings – Colour Coded
  • Brake Assist
  • CD Stacker – 6 disc In Dash/Cabin
  • Chrome Fittings
  • Chrome Grille
  • Cruise Control
  • EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
  • Flares Body Coloured
  • Fog Lamps – Front
  • Radio Cassette
  • Side Steps
  • Trim – Velour

Grande

Price when new: $71,990

Price used: $12,400 - $15,600

Adds

  • Air Cond. – Climate Control Multi-Zone
  • Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
  • Airbags – Head for 2nd Row Seats
  • Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
  • Alarm
  • Control – Electronic Damper
  • Control – Electronic Stability
  • Control – Hill Descent
  • Control – Traction
  • GPS (Satellite Navigation)
  • Glovebox – Cooled
  • Hill Holder
  • Leather Gear Knob
  • Leather Seats
  • Leather Steering Wheel
  • Metallic Finish Interior Inserts
  • Roof Rails
  • Sunroof – Electric
  • Suspension – Air
  • Suspension – Auto Levelling
  • Woodgrain – Inserts

VX

Price when new: $63,590

Price used: $11,800 - $14,600

Adds

  • Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt & Reach
  • Air Cond. – Climate Control 2 Zone
  • Electric Seat – Drivers
  • Seat – Driver with Electric Lumbar
  • Sunvisor – Illuminated Vanity Mirrors Dual

Pilbara

Price when new: $47,990

Price used: $9,700 - $12,100

Adds

  • Body Colour – Door Handles
  • Chrome Door Mirrors
  • Decals
  • Floor Mats
  • Leather Look – Gear Knob
  • Leather Look – Steering Wheel
  • Paint – Metallic
  • Wheels Steel in Lieu Alloys

GX Limited

Price when new: $45,990

Price used: $11,300 - $14,100

Adds

  • Chrome Door Handles – Interior

Standard

Price when new: $44,600

Price used: $13,900 - $16,700

Adds

  • Multi-function Steering Wheel

Tech specs

Body Styles

  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.7 litre, 4-cylinder petrol, 112kW / 240Nm (GX 2002 – 2004)
  • 4.0 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 179kW / 376Nm (GX 2002 – 2009, GXL 2002 – 2009, Grande 2002 – 2009, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 4.0 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 179kW / 343Nm (GX 2002 – 2009, GXL 2002 – 2009, VX 2004 – 2009, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 3.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 96kW / 343Nm (GX 2002 – 2006, GXL 2002 – 2006, Grande 2002 – 2006, VX 2004 – 2006, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 3.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 127kW / 410Nm (GX 2006 – 2009, GXL 2006 – 2009, VX 2006 – 2009, Grande 2006 – 2009, Standard 2007 – 2009)

Transmission

  • 5-speed Manual (GX, GXL, Pilbara, GX Limited)
  • 4-speed Automatic (GX, GXL, Grande, VX, Pilbara, GX Limited)
  • 6-speed Manual (GX, GXL, Pilbara, GX Limited, Standard)
  • 5-speed Automatic (GX, GXL, VX, Grande, Pilbara, GX Limited, Standard)

Fuel ConsumptionLength

  • 4810mm – 4850mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1790mm – 1875mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1850mm – 1905mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2790mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1936kg – 2289kg (All Models)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2500kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (GX, GXL, Grande, Pilbara, VX, GX Limited, Standard)
  • 4 stars, tested 2003 (Grande, VX, Standard, GX, GXL)

Body Styles

  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.7 litre, 4-cylinder petrol, 112kW / 240Nm (GX 2002 – 2004)
  • 4.0 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 179kW / 376Nm (GX 2002 – 2009, GXL 2002 – 2009, Grande 2002 – 2009, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 4.0 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 179kW / 343Nm (GX 2002 – 2009, GXL 2002 – 2009, VX 2004 – 2009, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 3.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 96kW / 343Nm (GX 2002 – 2006, GXL 2002 – 2006, Grande 2002 – 2006, VX 2004 – 2006, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 3.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 127kW / 410Nm (GX 2006 – 2009, GXL 2006 – 2009, VX 2006 – 2009, Grande 2006 – 2009, Standard 2007 – 2009)

Transmission

  • 5-speed Manual (GX, GXL, Pilbara, GX Limited)
  • 4-speed Automatic (GX, GXL, Grande, VX, Pilbara, GX Limited)
  • 6-speed Manual (GX, GXL, Pilbara, GX Limited, Standard)
  • 5-speed Automatic (GX, GXL, VX, Grande, Pilbara, GX Limited, Standard)

Fuel ConsumptionLength

  • 4810mm – 4850mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1790mm – 1875mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1850mm – 1905mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2790mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1936kg – 2289kg (All Models)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2500kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (GX, GXL, Grande, Pilbara, VX, GX Limited, Standard)
  • 4 stars, tested 2003 (Grande, VX, Standard, GX, GXL)

Body Styles

  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.7 litre, 4-cylinder petrol, 112kW / 240Nm (GX 2002 – 2004)
  • 4.0 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 179kW / 376Nm (GX 2002 – 2009, GXL 2002 – 2009, Grande 2002 – 2009, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 4.0 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 179kW / 343Nm (GX 2002 – 2009, GXL 2002 – 2009, VX 2004 – 2009, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 3.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 96kW / 343Nm (GX 2002 – 2006, GXL 2002 – 2006, Grande 2002 – 2006, VX 2004 – 2006, Pilbara 2005, GX Limited 2006)
  • 3.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 127kW / 410Nm (GX 2006 – 2009, GXL 2006 – 2009, VX 2006 – 2009, Grande 2006 – 2009, Standard 2007 – 2009)

Transmission

  • 5-speed Manual (GX, GXL, Pilbara, GX Limited)
  • 4-speed Automatic (GX, GXL, Grande, VX, Pilbara, GX Limited)
  • 6-speed Manual (GX, GXL, Pilbara, GX Limited, Standard)
  • 5-speed Automatic (GX, GXL, VX, Grande, Pilbara, GX Limited, Standard)

Fuel ConsumptionLength

  • 4810mm – 4850mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1790mm – 1875mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1850mm – 1905mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2790mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1936kg – 2289kg (All Models)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2500kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (GX, GXL, Grande, Pilbara, VX, GX Limited, Standard)
  • 4 stars, tested 2003 (Grande, VX, Standard, GX, GXL)

Warranty & servicing

Warranty

  • 3 years / 100,000 km (All Models)

Servicing

  • 10,000 km / 6 months (GX, GXL, VX, Grande, Standard)
  • 10,000 km / 0 months (Grande)

Buying a used car? Buy a PPSR report first.

Have ultimate peace of mind when buying a used car by purchasing an official PPSR report.

In the market?

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of Jun 05, 2024.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

Related Blog Articles Latest from ReDriven Blog

Join the ReDriven Community

© 2024 ReDriven All Rights Reserved