Pros

  • When new, offers excellent value for money. Used amplifies this
  • Great reputation for reliability
  • A long list of standard equipment
  • Offers everything most would need from a ute-based SUV

Cons

  • Polarising looks
  • Doesn’t feel as premium as some of the competition
  • The engine is uninspiring to drive
  • Lacks brand name panache

Verdict

Well, if you can handle the polarising looks of the thing, yes, you should totally buy a Pajero Sport.

When brand new, the Pajero Sport offers immense ability, a great range of features and equipment and really everything you’d want from a ute-based SUV.

And when used, it simply provides...

Get finance

Personalise your quote

What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

Per week*

8.49%

Comparison rate p.a#

The Mitsubishi Pajero Sport is a ute-based 5- or 7-seat SUV. Much like the Toyota Fortuner, Isuzu MU-X and Ford Everest it competes with, the Pajero Sport is based on its 4×4 dual-cab counterpart, the Mitsubishi Triton, in the case of Pajero Sport.

The Pajero Sport is powered by a 2.4-litre turbo-diesel, producing 133kW of power and 430Nm of torque, and power is sent through an 8-speed automatic and has four-wheel drive.

The Pajero Sport is extremely capable off-road, thanks to its Super Select II 4×4 system, but unlike some of its competitors that only allow 4×4 mode on loose surfaces, Super Select II allows the Pajero Sport to be in 4×4 on grippy surfaces too. This means you can drive in full-time 4×4, making the Pajero Sport one of the safer SUVs to drive.

Available in base-level GLX-trim, the Pajero Sport comes with 18-in alloys, a 7-inch infotainment screen, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto, climate control and Super Select II as standard, but spec up to higher grades (Black Edition, GLS, Exceed and GSR) and you can get leather seats, dual-zone climate control, auto headlights, and a surround-view camera, along with much, much more.

 

The Mitsubishi Pajero Sport is a ute-based 5- or 7-seat SUV. Much like the Toyota Fortuner, Isuzu MU-X and Ford Everest it competes with, the Pajero Sport is based on its 4×4 dual-cab counterpart, the Mitsubishi Triton, in the case of Pajero Sport.

The Pajero Sport is powered by a 2.4-litre turbo-diesel, producing 133kW of power and 430Nm of torque, and power is sent through an 8-speed automatic and has four-wheel drive.

The Pajero Sport is extremely capable off-road, thanks to its Super Select II 4×4 system, but unlike some of its competitors that only allow 4×4 mode on loose surfaces, Super Select II allows the Pajero Sport to be in 4×4 on grippy surfaces too. This means you can drive in full-time 4×4, making the Pajero Sport one of the safer SUVs to drive.

Available in base-level GLX-trim, the Pajero Sport comes with 18-in alloys, a 7-inch infotainment screen, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto, climate control and Super Select II as standard, but spec up to higher grades (Black Edition, GLS, Exceed and GSR) and you can get leather seats, dual-zone climate control, auto headlights, and a surround-view camera, along with much, much more.

 

The Mitsubishi Pajero Sport is a ute-based 5- or 7-seat SUV. Much like the Toyota Fortuner, Isuzu MU-X and Ford Everest it competes with, the Pajero Sport is based on its 4×4 dual-cab counterpart, the Mitsubishi Triton, in the case of Pajero Sport.

The Pajero Sport is powered by a 2.4-litre turbo-diesel, producing 133kW of power and 430Nm of torque, and power is sent through an 8-speed automatic and has four-wheel drive.

The Pajero Sport is extremely capable off-road, thanks to its Super Select II 4×4 system, but unlike some of its competitors that only allow 4×4 mode on loose surfaces, Super Select II allows the Pajero Sport to be in 4×4 on grippy surfaces too. This means you can drive in full-time 4×4, making the Pajero Sport one of the safer SUVs to drive.

Available in base-level GLX-trim, the Pajero Sport comes with 18-in alloys, a 7-inch infotainment screen, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto, climate control and Super Select II as standard, but spec up to higher grades (Black Edition, GLS, Exceed and GSR) and you can get leather seats, dual-zone climate control, auto headlights, and a surround-view camera, along with much, much more.

 

Exterior:

The bash plate mounts are notoriously weak; however, this is simple to rectify as there are stronger aftermarket options available.

The parking brake, if exposed to any sort of mud or just nature in general, they are easily prone to become stuck on or just moving out of adjustment. This will usually bring up an error/warning on the dashboard, in which case you’ll have to take it to a mechanic to get it readjusted.

Interior:

There have been reports of excess creaks or knocks coming from the steering column.

The head units or infotainment systems, in a few examples, have been a bit hit or miss, with reports of some owners having to replace the entire system more than once. Although, this isn’t really common as such though.

Mechanically:

The 4N15 engine isn’t exactly what you’d call a powerhouse, but it does get the job done, and it is considered to be fairly reliable.

By far, the most common issue is split intercooler pipes, with most owners opting for an aftermarket silicone alternative.

This engine has about the same amount of DPF and EGR complications as most other cars in this category, and some of those issues in these are from faulty DPF temperature sensors (and split intercooler pipes).

They run a timing chain, not a belt, so that is one saving in the overall servicing costs, but it recommended the valve clearances be checked and adjusted every 60,000km. Some say (including some dealerships) an audible check is all that’s needed. But the trouble is the valve clearances can get tighter, not looser (which stops the valves from seating properly), which doesn’t make any abnormal noises.

It’s not a cheap exercise, and some owners just flat-out don’t want to pay the extra money to have that done, which is definitely a bad choice.

Another thing that will definitely pay off, in the long run, is fitting a catch can. That helps reduce inlet clogging, which they are prone to. In saying that, a catch can affect your warranty which is an absolute cop-out by dealerships looking for any way possible to not honour your warranty, or it really just demonstrates that they don’t understand how engines work.

The 8-speed auto in these is the Toyota-derived Aisin transmission, and it’s in a variety of rear-wheel-drive applications and is arguably one of the most reliable 8-speed transmissions in this category. With regular servicing, you’re unlikely to have too many issues with it. It is advisable tough if you’re towing to install an additional cooler.

Overall, yes, they are very reliable, but like everything, you need to check the services are up to date, especially if it has the remainder of the

Exterior:

The bash plate mounts are notoriously weak; however, this is simple to rectify as there are stronger aftermarket options available.

The parking brake, if exposed to any sort of mud or just nature in general, they are easily prone to become stuck on or just moving out of adjustment. This will usually bring up an error/warning on the dashboard, in which case you’ll have to take it to a mechanic to get it readjusted.

Interior:

There have been reports of excess creaks or knocks coming from the steering column.

The head units or infotainment systems, in a few examples, have been a bit hit or miss, with reports of some owners having to replace the entire system more than once. Although, this isn’t really common as such though.

Mechanically:

The 4N15 engine isn’t exactly what you’d call a powerhouse, but it does get the job done, and it is considered to be fairly reliable.

By far, the most common issue is split intercooler pipes, with most owners opting for an aftermarket silicone alternative.

This engine has about the same amount of DPF and EGR complications as most other cars in this category, and some of those issues in these are from faulty DPF temperature sensors (and split intercooler pipes).

They run a timing chain, not a belt, so that is one saving in the overall servicing costs, but it recommended the valve clearances be checked and adjusted every 60,000km. Some say (including some dealerships) an audible check is all that’s needed. But the trouble is the valve clearances can get tighter, not looser (which stops the valves from seating properly), which doesn’t make any abnormal noises.

It’s not a cheap exercise, and some owners just flat-out don’t want to pay the extra money to have that done, which is definitely a bad choice.

Another thing that will definitely pay off, in the long run, is fitting a catch can. That helps reduce inlet clogging, which they are prone to. In saying that, a catch can affect your warranty which is an absolute cop-out by dealerships looking for any way possible to not honour your warranty, or it really just demonstrates that they don’t understand how engines work.

The 8-speed auto in these is the Toyota-derived Aisin transmission, and it’s in a variety of rear-wheel-drive applications and is arguably one of the most reliable 8-speed transmissions in this category. With regular servicing, you’re unlikely to have too many issues with it. It is advisable tough if you’re towing to install an additional cooler.

Overall, yes, they are very reliable, but like everything, you need to check the services are up to date, especially if it has the remainder of the new car warranty.

Recalls:

  • 29 March 2016 – Tow bar flange bolts may become loose during normal use. This recall affected 18,102 units built between 2015 & 2016.

Exterior:

The bash plate mounts are notoriously weak; however, this is simple to rectify as there are stronger aftermarket options available.

The parking brake, if exposed to any sort of mud or just nature in general, they are easily prone to become stuck on or just moving out of adjustment. This will usually bring up an error/warning on the dashboard, in which case you’ll have to take it to a mechanic to get it readjusted.

Interior:

There have been reports of excess creaks or knocks coming from the steering column.

The head units or infotainment systems, in a few examples, have been a bit hit or miss, with reports of some owners having to replace the entire system more than once. Although, this isn’t really common as such though.

Mechanically:

The 4N15 engine isn’t exactly what you’d call a powerhouse, but it does get the job done, and it is considered to be fairly reliable.

By far, the most common issue is split intercooler pipes, with most owners opting for an aftermarket silicone alternative.

This engine has about the same amount of DPF and EGR complications as most other cars in this category, and some of those issues in these are from faulty DPF temperature sensors (and split intercooler pipes).

They run a timing chain, not a belt, so that is one saving in the overall servicing costs, but it recommended the valve clearances be checked and adjusted every 60,000km. Some say (including some dealerships) an audible check is all that’s needed. But the trouble is the valve clearances can get tighter, not looser (which stops the valves from seating properly), which doesn’t make any abnormal noises.

It’s not a cheap exercise, and some owners just flat-out don’t want to pay the extra money to have that done, which is definitely a bad choice.

Another thing that will definitely pay off, in the long run, is fitting a catch can. That helps reduce inlet clogging, which they are prone to. In saying that, a catch can affect your warranty which is an absolute cop-out by dealerships looking for any way possible to not honour your warranty, or it really just demonstrates that they don’t understand how engines work.

The 8-speed auto in these is the Toyota-derived Aisin transmission, and it’s in a variety of rear-wheel-drive applications and is arguably one of the most reliable 8-speed transmissions in this category. With regular servicing, you’re unlikely to have too many issues with it. It is advisable tough if you’re towing to install an additional cooler.

Overall, yes, they are very reliable, but like everything, you need to check the services are up to date, especially if it has the remainder of the new car warranty.

Recalls:

  • 29 March 2016 – Tow bar flange bolts may become loose during normal use. This recall affected 18,102 units built between 2015 & 2016.

Body Style:

5-door SUV

Engines:

2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Power:

133kW – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Torque:

430Nm – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Transmission & drivetrains:

8-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4×4)

Fuel Consumption:

8.0L/100km

Length:

4785mm

Width:

1815mm

Height:

1805mm

Kerb Weight:

2045 – 2070kg

Towing (braked/unbraked):

3100/750kg

Body Style:

5-door SUV

Engines:

2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Power:

133kW – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Torque:

430Nm – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Transmission & drivetrains:

8-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4×4)

Fuel Consumption:

8.0L/100km

Length:

4785mm

Width:

1815mm

Height:

1805mm

Kerb Weight:

2045 – 2070kg

Towing (braked/unbraked):

3100/750kg

Body Style:

5-door SUV

Engines:

2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Power:

133kW – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Torque:

430Nm – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel

Transmission & drivetrains:

8-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4×4)

Fuel Consumption:

8.0L/100km

Length:

4785mm

Width:

1815mm

Height:

1805mm

Kerb Weight:

2045 – 2070kg

Towing (braked/unbraked):

3100/750kg

Warranty:

5-year/100,000kms

Servicing:

12 months/15,000kms

Model range, pricing and features

Mitsubishi Pajero Sport Exceed-2

GLX

Price when new: $43,940 - $49,940

Price used: $26,000 - $51,000

The Thai-made Pajero Sport GLX was launched in December 2015. It features a 2.4 litre 4-cylinder turbo-diesel engine with 133kW of power and 430Nm of torque, paired with an 8-speed automatic transmission.

The Pajero Sport received a 5-star ANCAP safety rating in 2015 and includes key features such as a front stabiliser, rear stabiliser, “Super Select II” 4WD system, centre differential, LED headlights, climate control, and keyless entry.

In 2018, the GLX added forward collision warning (FCW) and adaptive cruise control, 2x USB ports for second-row occupants, and a 120-watt power socket.

An MY20 update added a full-size alloy wheel, auto-adjusting LED headlights, and autonomous emergency braking (AEB).

Standard Features:

18-inch alloy wheels
Roof rails
Privacy glass
Rear mudflaps
Front and rear tow hooks
Stop/start system
Front stabiliser
Rear stabiliser
“Super Select II” 4WD system
Centre differential
5-star ANCAP safety rating (tested 2015)
Driver and front passenger airbags
Front side airbags
Full-length curtain airbags
Driver’s knee airbag
Side door impact beams
3-point (lap sash) seatbelt for all occupants
Height adjustable seatbelts for driver and front passenger
Seat pretensioners and load limiters for all passengers
ISOFIX points for rear outboard seats
Child seat anchor points
Seatbelt reminder for driver and front passenger’s seat
Headrests for all occupants
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD)
Brake assist
Electronic stability program (ESP)
Traction control
Hill descent control (HDC)
Hill start assist (HSA)
Pre-crash system
Rear parking sensors
Reversing camera – in infotainment system
Rear vision mirror
Electric side mirrors
Electrically folding side mirrors
Electric windows – front and rear with driver’s auto up/down function
Cruise control
LED headlights
Front fog lights
LED side indicators integrated into side mirrors
Daytime running lights (DRL)
LED tail lights
Intermittent wipers with speed settings
Rear wiper
Remote central locking with keyless entry (via button on door handle)
Proximity entry
Push button start
Engine immobiliser
Anti-theft alarm
Tachometer
Fuel gauge
Trip computer
Monochrome driver’s display
Gearshift paddles
Electromechnical handbrake
Handbrake auto hold function
Power steering
Steering wheel – tilt (up/down) and telescopic (reach) adjust
Multi-functional leather steering wheel
Leather gear knob
Single-zone climate control
Air vents on the ceiling
Seating capacity: five – over two rows
Bucket seats
Water repellent cloth seat trim
Manually adjustable driver’s and front passenger’s seat
7.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system
4-speaker sound system
AM/FM radio
DAB+ digital radio
Bluetooth connectivity – phone and audio streaming
Apple CarPlay – wired
Android Auto – wired
Voice recogition
iPod connectivity
USB connectivity
Front 12V power outlet – 2x
120-watt power socket
2x cup holders – front
2x cup holders – rear
2x bottle holders – front
2x bottle holders – rear
Centre console storage
Glovebox
Floor console storage
Front seat map pockets
Sunglasses holder
Vanity mirror for driver and front passenger
60:40 rear folding seats

April 2018 update:
Forward collision warning (FCW)
Adaptive cruise control
2x USB ports for second row occupants
Relocated 120-watt power socket

MY20 update:
Full-size alloy wheel
Auto-adjusting LED headlights
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)”

Black Edition

Price when new: $51,750 - $52,740

Price used: $38,700 - $48,700

The Black Edition was a special edition introduced in September 2018, based on the base GLX model and added a black styling package, roof-mounted rear spoiler, auto-headlights, rain-sensing wipers, seven-seat capacity over three rows and a 6-speaker sound system.

Additional Features:

Black styling package
Roof-mounted rear spoiler
Automatic headlights
Rain-sensing (auto) wipers
Seating capacity: seven – over three rows
6-speaker sound system

GLS

Price when new: $48,500 - $55,190

Price used: $27,500 - $55,200

The GLS mid-range model added a rear differential lock, cargo tonneau cover, auto-headlights, rain-sensing wipers, dual-zone climate control, electrochromatic rear vision mirror, leather-like upholstery, electrically adjustable front seats and 6-speaker sound system.

A MY21 update resulted in the electric front seats and leather upholstery being removed as standard equipment and made available as a $2,000 Deluxe Package option.

Additional Features:

Rear differential lock
Automatic headlights
Rain-sensing (auto) wipers
Dual-zone climate control
Electrochromatic rearview mirror
Leather-like upholstery
Electrically adjustable drivers and front passengers seat
6-speaker sound system
Cargo tonneau cover

MY21 update:

Loses electrically adjustable drivers and front passengers seat
Loses Leather-like upholstery

Exceed

Price when new: $52,750 - $60,690

Price used: $30,000 - $60,000

The top-of-the-range Exceed adds headlight washers, forward collision warning, blind-spot monitoring, steering wheel camera switch, heated front seats, 8-speaker sound system and a rear seat DVD entertainment system.

An MY20 update gained rear-cross traffic alert and Apple Watch connectivity, and an MY21 update added a surround-view camera.

Additional Features:

Headlight washers
Forward collision warning (FCW)
Blind-spot monitoring (BSM)
Steering wheel camera switch
Seat heating: driver and front passenger
8-speaker sound system
Rear seat DVD entertainment system

MY20 update:

Rear-cross traffic alert
Apple Watch connectivity

MY21 update:

Surround-view camera

GSR

Price when new: $61,440 - $62,440

Price used: $51,400 - $61,700

The GSR sport-focused model was introduced as the top-of-the-range model in 2022, and added a black styling package as well as “Pajero Sport” lettering across the bonnet.

Additional Features:

Black roof, bumper and headlight garnishes, rear spoiler and grille
Black contrast roof
“Pajero Sport” lettering across the bonnet

Well, if you can handle the polarising looks of the thing, yes, you should totally buy a Pajero Sport.

When brand new, the Pajero Sport offers immense ability, a great range of features and equipment and really everything you’d want from a ute-based SUV.

And when used, it simply provides even more value for money, plus is proving to be ultra-reliable, build quality is consistent, and it might potentially be the pick for this particular category.

But don’t get us wrong, it’s not perfect, and there are compromises and areas that could be improved, but the same can be said for all of the Pajero Sports competitors.

Just like the dual cab utes the Everest, MUX, Fortuner and Pajero Sport are based on, they’re all really good, and they’re all a little bit shit here and there.

But the Pajero Sport arguably offers the best bang for your buck, and for us, if it ticks all the pre-purchase boxes, is a winner.

Well, if you can handle the polarising looks of the thing, yes, you should totally buy a Pajero Sport.

When brand new, the Pajero Sport offers immense ability, a great range of features and equipment and really everything you’d want from a ute-based SUV.

And when used, it simply provides even more value for money, plus is proving to be ultra-reliable, build quality is consistent, and it might potentially be the pick for this particular category.

But don’t get us wrong, it’s not perfect, and there are compromises and areas that could be improved, but the same can be said for all of the Pajero Sports competitors.

Just like the dual cab utes the Everest, MUX, Fortuner and Pajero Sport are based on, they’re all really good, and they’re all a little bit shit here and there.

But the Pajero Sport arguably offers the best bang for your buck, and for us, if it ticks all the pre-purchase boxes, is a winner.

Well, if you can handle the polarising looks of the thing, yes, you should totally buy a Pajero Sport.

When brand new, the Pajero Sport offers immense ability, a great range of features and equipment and really everything you’d want from a ute-based SUV.

And when used, it simply provides even more value for money, plus is proving to be ultra-reliable, build quality is consistent, and it might potentially be the pick for this particular category.

But don’t get us wrong, it’s not perfect, and there are compromises and areas that could be improved, but the same can be said for all of the Pajero Sports competitors.

Just like the dual cab utes the Everest, MUX, Fortuner and Pajero Sport are based on, they’re all really good, and they’re all a little bit shit here and there.

But the Pajero Sport arguably offers the best bang for your buck, and for us, if it ticks all the pre-purchase boxes, is a winner.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of January 27, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

Related Blog Articles Latest from ReDriven Blog

Join the ReDriven Community

© 2024 ReDriven All Rights Reserved