Pros

  • Ignore the negative connotations, it’s a real sports car.
  • Surprisingly practical (for what it is).
  • Many of the typical VW/Audi mechanical gremlins have been sorted.
  • Being the last of its breed, could be a future classic.

Cons

  • Parts and maintenance can be expensive.
  • It’s improved but is still guilty of some of the typical VW/Audi reliability concerns.
  • Not as focussed a drivers car as much of the competition.
  • Your friends may incorrectly regard the TT as a fake sports car.

Verdict

Should you consider purchasing a third-generation Audi TT? If your lifestyle accommodates a two-seat sports car (yes it has rear seats but they’re only for the smallest children), and you enter TT ownership fully aware that there’s a high probability of investing both money and time in maintenance and repairs,...

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Let’s set the stage: the revolutionary first-generation Audi TT made its debut 25 years ago however, in this cheat sheet, our focus will be on the third generation, produced from 2015 to 2023, which unfortunately marks the final iteration. Available as either a coupe or convertible, catering to various preferences, with no intention of stereotyping hairdressers—we’re just kidding, of course.

Within this generation, there are two iterations, with the 2018 to 2023 post-update introducing slight visual changes, technological enhancements, and the customary updates.

Sharing its platform and numerous mechanical components with more performance-oriented Volkswagen Golf models, internationally, various 4-cylinder engines were on offer. In Australia, however, we received the 2.0-litre turbo in two different states of tune, depending on the model. Additionally, there’s the more intense 5-cylinder turbo TT RS, a beast deserving of its own dedicated discussion.

Depending on the model year, you can opt for either front-wheel drive or Quattro all-wheel drive. Transmission options include 6-speed manuals or 6-7 speed dual-clutch transmissions.

Moving on to trim specifications, internationally, there’s a multitude of variants, but locally, hardtops are available in four flavours, with a recent addition of a Final Edition. Soft tops come in five variants, and due to the array of optional extras, TTs of the same trim spec may vary considerably.

For an in-depth understanding of the various trim specs and their inclusions, refer to the details below.

While a used third-generation TT may appear appealing, combining style, performance, practicality, and a premium image at an affordable

Let’s set the stage: the revolutionary first-generation Audi TT made its debut 25 years ago however, in this cheat sheet, our focus will be on the third generation, produced from 2015 to 2023, which unfortunately marks the final iteration. Available as either a coupe or convertible, catering to various preferences, with no intention of stereotyping hairdressers—we’re just kidding, of course.

Within this generation, there are two iterations, with the 2018 to 2023 post-update introducing slight visual changes, technological enhancements, and the customary updates.

Sharing its platform and numerous mechanical components with more performance-oriented Volkswagen Golf models, internationally, various 4-cylinder engines were on offer. In Australia, however, we received the 2.0-litre turbo in two different states of tune, depending on the model. Additionally, there’s the more intense 5-cylinder turbo TT RS, a beast deserving of its own dedicated discussion.

Depending on the model year, you can opt for either front-wheel drive or Quattro all-wheel drive. Transmission options include 6-speed manuals or 6-7 speed dual-clutch transmissions.

Moving on to trim specifications, internationally, there’s a multitude of variants, but locally, hardtops are available in four flavours, with a recent addition of a Final Edition. Soft tops come in five variants, and due to the array of optional extras, TTs of the same trim spec may vary considerably.

For an in-depth understanding of the various trim specs and their inclusions, refer to the details below.

While a used third-generation TT may appear appealing, combining style, performance, practicality, and a premium image at an affordable price, it’s crucial to bear in mind that Volkswagen and Audi haven’t always boasted stellar records in terms of reliability and mechanical robustness. Does the TT suffer from similar issues? Continue reading to find out.

Let’s set the stage: the revolutionary first-generation Audi TT made its debut 25 years ago however, in this cheat sheet, our focus will be on the third generation, produced from 2015 to 2023, which unfortunately marks the final iteration. Available as either a coupe or convertible, catering to various preferences, with no intention of stereotyping hairdressers—we’re just kidding, of course.

Within this generation, there are two iterations, with the 2018 to 2023 post-update introducing slight visual changes, technological enhancements, and the customary updates.

Sharing its platform and numerous mechanical components with more performance-oriented Volkswagen Golf models, internationally, various 4-cylinder engines were on offer. In Australia, however, we received the 2.0-litre turbo in two different states of tune, depending on the model. Additionally, there’s the more intense 5-cylinder turbo TT RS, a beast deserving of its own dedicated discussion.

Depending on the model year, you can opt for either front-wheel drive or Quattro all-wheel drive. Transmission options include 6-speed manuals or 6-7 speed dual-clutch transmissions.

Moving on to trim specifications, internationally, there’s a multitude of variants, but locally, hardtops are available in four flavours, with a recent addition of a Final Edition. Soft tops come in five variants, and due to the array of optional extras, TTs of the same trim spec may vary considerably.

For an in-depth understanding of the various trim specs and their inclusions, refer to the details below.

While a used third-generation TT may appear appealing, combining style, performance, practicality, and a premium image at an affordable price, it’s crucial to bear in mind that Volkswagen and Audi haven’t always boasted stellar records in terms of reliability and mechanical robustness. Does the TT suffer from similar issues? Continue reading to find out.

Exterior:

One prominent issue involves water leakage in the spoiler area, where water infiltrates the tailgate through blocked drainage holes or degraded seals around mounting bolts. This can adversely affect electronic components like number plate lights and the boot release. It is essential to exercise caution when attempting a DIY fix, especially around the reversing camera, as improper handling may necessitate recalibration.

Numerous complaints exist regarding water seepage, prompting recommendations to join owner groups for valuable insights. In colder climates, a peculiar challenge arises, where the window mechanism may freeze as the glass drops to open or close the door, resulting in difficulties in proper door closure. Using lukewarm water along the window seal is advised for resolution.

Convertible owners have reported water ingress into the cabin due to blocked drain holes, leading to potential electrical issues affecting the sound system and electric seats. Regular maintenance to clear drainage holes is crucial to prevent such problems. While sporadic electronic gremlins have been mentioned, they are not widely reported.

 

Interior:

Some owners have experienced issues with rear seats not folding, where the cable remains attached at the top of the pulley but fails to unlock the seats. Additionally, concerns have been raised about the durability of side trim on seats, particularly in pre-update models where plastic trim can break easily.

Pre-update speakers may not withstand high volumes of loud music and are prone to blowing. Complaints about the HVAC system include instances where all three vents cease working, often attributed to servo issues. Occasionally, buttons on the system may become brittle and break, though these issues are generally not complex to fix but can be annoying.

A few owners have noted a slow startup of the 12.3-inch Virtual Cockpit screen, but it eventually functions. Sporadic reports of electronic issues exist, emphasising the importance of thoroughly testing all features before purchase.

 

Mechanically:

The most common and somewhat expensive fault involves the water pump and thermostat module, known to fail early and frequently. Non-genuine pumps are reported to outlast genuine parts.

Engine breather (PCV) complications are prevalent, leading to coked-up inlet valves, requiring cleaning processes like chemical and walnut blast.

PCV issues may worsen, oil leaks, particularly in valve cover, timing cover seals, or the rear main oil seal can occur. The rear main oil seal leak also requires the transmission to be removed to fix it, at a substantial cost.

Poorly serviced units may experience timing chain complications. Age-related problems associated with engine bay plastics, like the water pump, are common and will continue to get worse.

The DSG transmission has faced criticism for potential frequent failures, but proper and timely servicing tends to mitigate issues. DSG position sensor and

Exterior:

One prominent issue involves water leakage in the spoiler area, where water infiltrates the tailgate through blocked drainage holes or degraded seals around mounting bolts. This can adversely affect electronic components like number plate lights and the boot release. It is essential to exercise caution when attempting a DIY fix, especially around the reversing camera, as improper handling may necessitate recalibration.

Numerous complaints exist regarding water seepage, prompting recommendations to join owner groups for valuable insights. In colder climates, a peculiar challenge arises, where the window mechanism may freeze as the glass drops to open or close the door, resulting in difficulties in proper door closure. Using lukewarm water along the window seal is advised for resolution.

Convertible owners have reported water ingress into the cabin due to blocked drain holes, leading to potential electrical issues affecting the sound system and electric seats. Regular maintenance to clear drainage holes is crucial to prevent such problems. While sporadic electronic gremlins have been mentioned, they are not widely reported.

 

Interior:

Some owners have experienced issues with rear seats not folding, where the cable remains attached at the top of the pulley but fails to unlock the seats. Additionally, concerns have been raised about the durability of side trim on seats, particularly in pre-update models where plastic trim can break easily.

Pre-update speakers may not withstand high volumes of loud music and are prone to blowing. Complaints about the HVAC system include instances where all three vents cease working, often attributed to servo issues. Occasionally, buttons on the system may become brittle and break, though these issues are generally not complex to fix but can be annoying.

A few owners have noted a slow startup of the 12.3-inch Virtual Cockpit screen, but it eventually functions. Sporadic reports of electronic issues exist, emphasising the importance of thoroughly testing all features before purchase.

 

Mechanically:

The most common and somewhat expensive fault involves the water pump and thermostat module, known to fail early and frequently. Non-genuine pumps are reported to outlast genuine parts.

Engine breather (PCV) complications are prevalent, leading to coked-up inlet valves, requiring cleaning processes like chemical and walnut blast.

PCV issues may worsen, oil leaks, particularly in valve cover, timing cover seals, or the rear main oil seal can occur. The rear main oil seal leak also requires the transmission to be removed to fix it, at a substantial cost.

Poorly serviced units may experience timing chain complications. Age-related problems associated with engine bay plastics, like the water pump, are common and will continue to get worse.

The DSG transmission has faced criticism for potential frequent failures, but proper and timely servicing tends to mitigate issues. DSG position sensor and mechatronics problems are less common than perceived. AWD versions with Haldex systems perform well with regular servicing.

Oil consumption is a known issue in this engine family, emphasising the importance of a thorough and documented service history. 

Despite being a high-performance luxury car, the service schedule is comparable to an ordinary Audi. Similar underpinnings as the Golf, Golf R, and S3 result in comparable servicing costs, with a water pump replacement every few years.

The major mechanical issues often arise from terrible modifications, poor tuning and driving with minimal mechanical sympathy.

We would strongly avoid modified examples as no matter what anyone tells you, extracting copious amounts of extra horsepower will impact reliability.

If the modified TT has received only a light tune, features the highest quality accessories and you can categorically prove the car has been fastidiously maintained, we’d still be very cautious.

Exterior:

One prominent issue involves water leakage in the spoiler area, where water infiltrates the tailgate through blocked drainage holes or degraded seals around mounting bolts. This can adversely affect electronic components like number plate lights and the boot release. It is essential to exercise caution when attempting a DIY fix, especially around the reversing camera, as improper handling may necessitate recalibration.

Numerous complaints exist regarding water seepage, prompting recommendations to join owner groups for valuable insights. In colder climates, a peculiar challenge arises, where the window mechanism may freeze as the glass drops to open or close the door, resulting in difficulties in proper door closure. Using lukewarm water along the window seal is advised for resolution.

Convertible owners have reported water ingress into the cabin due to blocked drain holes, leading to potential electrical issues affecting the sound system and electric seats. Regular maintenance to clear drainage holes is crucial to prevent such problems. While sporadic electronic gremlins have been mentioned, they are not widely reported.

 

Interior:

Some owners have experienced issues with rear seats not folding, where the cable remains attached at the top of the pulley but fails to unlock the seats. Additionally, concerns have been raised about the durability of side trim on seats, particularly in pre-update models where plastic trim can break easily.

Pre-update speakers may not withstand high volumes of loud music and are prone to blowing. Complaints about the HVAC system include instances where all three vents cease working, often attributed to servo issues. Occasionally, buttons on the system may become brittle and break, though these issues are generally not complex to fix but can be annoying.

A few owners have noted a slow startup of the 12.3-inch Virtual Cockpit screen, but it eventually functions. Sporadic reports of electronic issues exist, emphasising the importance of thoroughly testing all features before purchase.

 

Mechanically:

The most common and somewhat expensive fault involves the water pump and thermostat module, known to fail early and frequently. Non-genuine pumps are reported to outlast genuine parts.

Engine breather (PCV) complications are prevalent, leading to coked-up inlet valves, requiring cleaning processes like chemical and walnut blast.

PCV issues may worsen, oil leaks, particularly in valve cover, timing cover seals, or the rear main oil seal can occur. The rear main oil seal leak also requires the transmission to be removed to fix it, at a substantial cost.

Poorly serviced units may experience timing chain complications. Age-related problems associated with engine bay plastics, like the water pump, are common and will continue to get worse.

The DSG transmission has faced criticism for potential frequent failures, but proper and timely servicing tends to mitigate issues. DSG position sensor and mechatronics problems are less common than perceived. AWD versions with Haldex systems perform well with regular servicing.

Oil consumption is a known issue in this engine family, emphasising the importance of a thorough and documented service history. 

Despite being a high-performance luxury car, the service schedule is comparable to an ordinary Audi. Similar underpinnings as the Golf, Golf R, and S3 result in comparable servicing costs, with a water pump replacement every few years.

The major mechanical issues often arise from terrible modifications, poor tuning and driving with minimal mechanical sympathy.

We would strongly avoid modified examples as no matter what anyone tells you, extracting copious amounts of extra horsepower will impact reliability.

If the modified TT has received only a light tune, features the highest quality accessories and you can categorically prove the car has been fastidiously maintained, we’d still be very cautious.

Body Styles

  • 2 door Coupe
  • 2 door Roadster

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 169kW / 370Nm (Sport 2014 – 2018, S Line 2014 – 2018, 45 TFSI 2019 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 210kW / 380Nm (TTS 2015 – 2022)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 180kW / 370Nm (45 TFSI 2020 – 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (Sport, S Line)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (Sport, S Line, TTS, 45 TFSI)
  • 7-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (45 TFSI)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.1 – 8.5 / 100km (TTS)
  • 5.9 – 9.0 / 100km (45 TFSI)

Length

  • 4177mm – 4199mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 4177mm – 4191mm (2 door Roadster)

Width

  • 1832mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1343mm – 1371mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 1345mm – 1355mm (2 door Roadster)

Wheelbase

  • 2501mm – 2505mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 2505mm (2 door Roadster)

Kerb Weight

  • 1460kg (2 door Coupe)

Towing

  • Not listed

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (Sport, S Line, TTS, 45 TFSI)
  • 4 stars, tested 2015 (Sport, S Line)

Body Styles

  • 2 door Coupe
  • 2 door Roadster

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 169kW / 370Nm (Sport 2014 – 2018, S Line 2014 – 2018, 45 TFSI 2019 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 210kW / 380Nm (TTS 2015 – 2022)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 180kW / 370Nm (45 TFSI 2020 – 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (Sport, S Line)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (Sport, S Line, TTS, 45 TFSI)
  • 7-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (45 TFSI)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.1 – 8.5 / 100km (TTS)
  • 5.9 – 9.0 / 100km (45 TFSI)

Length

  • 4177mm – 4199mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 4177mm – 4191mm (2 door Roadster)

Width

  • 1832mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1343mm – 1371mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 1345mm – 1355mm (2 door Roadster)

Wheelbase

  • 2501mm – 2505mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 2505mm (2 door Roadster)

Kerb Weight

  • 1460kg (2 door Coupe)

Towing

  • Not listed

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (Sport, S Line, TTS, 45 TFSI)
  • 4 stars, tested 2015 (Sport, S Line)

Body Styles

  • 2 door Coupe
  • 2 door Roadster

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 169kW / 370Nm (Sport 2014 – 2018, S Line 2014 – 2018, 45 TFSI 2019 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 210kW / 380Nm (TTS 2015 – 2022)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-petrol, 180kW / 370Nm (45 TFSI 2020 – 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (Sport, S Line)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (Sport, S Line, TTS, 45 TFSI)
  • 7-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (45 TFSI)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.1 – 8.5 / 100km (TTS)
  • 5.9 – 9.0 / 100km (45 TFSI)

Length

  • 4177mm – 4199mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 4177mm – 4191mm (2 door Roadster)

Width

  • 1832mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1343mm – 1371mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 1345mm – 1355mm (2 door Roadster)

Wheelbase

  • 2501mm – 2505mm (2 door Coupe)
  • 2505mm (2 door Roadster)

Kerb Weight

  • 1460kg (2 door Coupe)

Towing

  • Not listed

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (Sport, S Line, TTS, 45 TFSI)
  • 4 stars, tested 2015 (Sport, S Line)

Warranty

  • 3 years / unlimited km (Sport, S Line, TTS, 45 TFSI)
  • 5 years / unlimited km (45 TFSI, TTS)

Servicing

  • 15,000 km / 12 months (All Models)

Model range, pricing & features

Audi TT-1

Sport

Price when new: $71,950 - $74,700

Price used: $30,100 - $47,300

Equipment

  • 12V Socket(s) – Auxiliary
  • 18″ Alloy Wheels
  • 8 Speaker Stereo
  • ABS (Antilock Brakes)
  • Active Torque Transfer System
  • Air Cond. – Climate Control
  • Airbag – Driver
  • Airbag – Passenger
  • Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
  • Airbags – Head for 2nd Row Seats
  • Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
  • Aluminium – Bonnet
  • Aluminium – Doors
  • Aluminium – Front Guards
  • Aluminium – Roof Panel
  • Ambient Lighting – Interior
  • Audio – Aux Input Socket (MP3/CD/Cassette)
  • Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
  • Bluetooth System
  • Body Colour – Bumpers
  • Body Colour – Door Handles
  • Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Partial
  • Brake Assist
  • CD Player
  • Cargo Net
  • Central Locking – Key Proximity
  • Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
  • Control – Electronic Stability
  • Control – Park Distance Front
  • Control – Park Distance Rear
  • Control – Traction
  • Cruise Control
  • DVD Player
  • Daytime Running Lamps – LED
  • Digital Instrument Display – Full
  • Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
  • Disc Brakes Rear Solid
  • Drive By Wire (Electronic Throttle Control)
  • Driver Attention Detection
  • Driving Mode – Selectable
  • Electric Seats – 1st Row (Front)
  • Electronic Differential Lock
  • Engine – Stop Start System (When at idle)
  • Floor Mats
  • Fog Lamp/s – Rear
  • GPS (Satellite Navigation)
  • Headlamp Washers
  • Headlamps – Bi-Xenon (for low & high beam)
  • Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
  • Heated Washer Jets
  • Hill Holder
  • Inbuilt Flash Drive
  • Keyless Start:- Key/FOB Proximity related
  • Leather Seats – Partial
  • Memory Card Reader
  • Metallic Finish Interior Inserts
  • Multi-function Control Screen – Colour
  • Multi-function Steering Wheel
  • Park Brake – Electric
  • Parking Assist – Graphical Display
  • Pedals – Sports
  • Power Door Mirrors – Heated
  • Power Steering – Active (Ratio Speed related)
  • Power Steering – Electric Assist
  • Power Windows – Front only
  • Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
  • Rear View Mirror – Electric Anti Glare
  • Seat – Driver with Electric Lumbar
  • Seat – Passenger with Electric Lumbar
  • Seats – 2nd Row Split Fold
  • Starter Button
  • Steering Wheel – Sports
  • Storage Compartment – Under Driver Seat
  • Storage Compartment – Under Passenger Seat
  • Suede Look – Interior Inserts
  • Suede Look – Seats Partial
  • Tyre Pressure Sensor
  • Voice Recognition

S Line

Price when new: $78,450 - $81,255

Price used: $32,500 - $51,500

Adds

  • 11 Speaker Stereo
  • 19″ Alloy Wheels
  • Amplifier – 1 Separate
  • Body Kit – Lower (skirts
  • F & R Aprons)
  • Brake Emergency Display – Hazard/Stoplights
  • Diffuser – Rear
  • Headlamps – LED
  • Leather Gear Knob
  • Metallic Finish Instrument Surrounds
  • Radio – Digital (DAB+)
  • Seat – Bolsters Adjustable for Driver
  • Seat – Bolsters Adjustable for Front Passenger
  • Steering Wheel – Race/Special
  • Tail Lamps – LED

TTS

Price when new: $99,300 - $103,000

Price used: $0 - $90,600

Adds

  • 9 Speaker Stereo
  • Armrest – Front Centre (Shared)
  • Camera – Rear Vision
  • Control – Electronic Damper
  • Cup Holders – 1st Row
  • Disc Brakes Rear Ventilated
  • Electric Seat – Drivers
  • Electric Seat – Passenger
  • Gloss Finish Inserts
  • Gloss Finish Inserts in Centre Console
  • Lane Departure – with Passive Steer Assist
  • Leather Steering Wheel
  • Power Steering – Variable Ratio (more lock faster)
  • Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
  • Tyre Repair Kit

 

MY17 update

  • Smart Device App Display/Control
  • Smart Device Integration – Android Auto
  • Smart Device Integration – Apple CarPlay

 

MY18 update

  • Speed Limiter

 

MY19 update

  • 12 Speaker Stereo
  • Calipers – Painted Front
  • Calipers – Painted Rear
  • Leather Seats – Nappa
  • Rear Windows – Extra Dark/Privacy

 

MY21 update

  • Premium Sound System

45 TFSI

Price when new: $79,900 - $84,000

Price used: $0 - $79,300

Adds

  • Blind Spot Sensor
  • Power Door Mirrors – Auto Dipping (Reversing)
  • Power Door Mirrors – Folding
  • Wireless Charging – Compatible Devices

 

MY21 update

  • Bonnet – Active Safety
  • Cruise Control – with Brake Function (limiter)
  • First Aid Kit
  • Footwell Lamps – Front
  • Footwell Lamps – Rear
  • Illuminated (puddle lamps) Door Mirrors

Should you consider purchasing a third-generation Audi TT? If your lifestyle accommodates a two-seat sports car (yes it has rear seats but they’re only for the smallest children), and you enter TT ownership fully aware that there’s a high probability of investing both money and time in maintenance and repairs, then yes, you should buy one.

This marks the final and arguably the best iteration of the TT, potentially earning classic status. However, exercise caution and ensure you’re investing in a well-maintained model.

However, with numerous TTs available in the used market, the question arises: which one should you choose? The answer is straightforward – opt for the 911 Carrera T Audi TT.

In the Porsche 911 realm, enthusiasts often covet the high-performance models like the GT3RS, GT2, and Turbo S. Yet, for those well-versed in the intricacies of the 911, a manual Carrera T stands out as the best 911.

Stripped of excess features, the Carrera T embraces the essence of manual gear changes, enhancing the overall driving experience. The parallel with the TT is evident.

Investing around $35,000 in a lower spec front-wheel drive manual TT proves to be a wise choice. In comparison, an all-wheel drive dual clutch and more powerful TTS from the same period might demand an additional $10,000 to $15,000.

We highly recommend utilising the saved funds for quality driving lessons to master the art of manual driving, and allocate the rest toward tasteful modifications to elevate the driving experience, and maybe pop a

Should you consider purchasing a third-generation Audi TT? If your lifestyle accommodates a two-seat sports car (yes it has rear seats but they’re only for the smallest children), and you enter TT ownership fully aware that there’s a high probability of investing both money and time in maintenance and repairs, then yes, you should buy one.

This marks the final and arguably the best iteration of the TT, potentially earning classic status. However, exercise caution and ensure you’re investing in a well-maintained model.

However, with numerous TTs available in the used market, the question arises: which one should you choose? The answer is straightforward – opt for the 911 Carrera T Audi TT.

In the Porsche 911 realm, enthusiasts often covet the high-performance models like the GT3RS, GT2, and Turbo S. Yet, for those well-versed in the intricacies of the 911, a manual Carrera T stands out as the best 911.

Stripped of excess features, the Carrera T embraces the essence of manual gear changes, enhancing the overall driving experience. The parallel with the TT is evident.

Investing around $35,000 in a lower spec front-wheel drive manual TT proves to be a wise choice. In comparison, an all-wheel drive dual clutch and more powerful TTS from the same period might demand an additional $10,000 to $15,000.

We highly recommend utilising the saved funds for quality driving lessons to master the art of manual driving, and allocate the rest toward tasteful modifications to elevate the driving experience, and maybe pop a couple of thousand dollars away for potential issues.

Should you consider purchasing a third-generation Audi TT? If your lifestyle accommodates a two-seat sports car (yes it has rear seats but they’re only for the smallest children), and you enter TT ownership fully aware that there’s a high probability of investing both money and time in maintenance and repairs, then yes, you should buy one.

This marks the final and arguably the best iteration of the TT, potentially earning classic status. However, exercise caution and ensure you’re investing in a well-maintained model.

However, with numerous TTs available in the used market, the question arises: which one should you choose? The answer is straightforward – opt for the 911 Carrera T Audi TT.

In the Porsche 911 realm, enthusiasts often covet the high-performance models like the GT3RS, GT2, and Turbo S. Yet, for those well-versed in the intricacies of the 911, a manual Carrera T stands out as the best 911.

Stripped of excess features, the Carrera T embraces the essence of manual gear changes, enhancing the overall driving experience. The parallel with the TT is evident.

Investing around $35,000 in a lower spec front-wheel drive manual TT proves to be a wise choice. In comparison, an all-wheel drive dual clutch and more powerful TTS from the same period might demand an additional $10,000 to $15,000.

We highly recommend utilising the saved funds for quality driving lessons to master the art of manual driving, and allocate the rest toward tasteful modifications to elevate the driving experience, and maybe pop a couple of thousand dollars away for potential issues.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of Jan 07, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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