Pros

  • Affordable to buy, but no if you’re after an S or SS model.
  • Solid drivetrain
  • Good ones are holding their value very well
  • Lazy V6 power

Cons

  • Many will have abused within an inch of their life
  • Good ones are becoming rare, so aren’t cheap for what they are
  • They’re getting old, so not the safest car on the road

Verdict

If you’re looking buying a Holden VT Commodore, it’s likely you fall into one of two camps. You’re either looking for one of the ‘normal’ models as a dependable family car, for not too much money, or you’re looking for a mint condition example of one of the more special...

Get finance

Personalise your quote

What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

Per week*

8.49%

Comparison rate p.a#

The 1997-2000 Holden VT Commodore was a mid-size family sedan produced by Holden. It was the seventh generation of the popular Commodore series and was a significant step forward in terms of design, technology, and performance.

The VT Commodore featured a sleek and aerodynamic exterior design, with a more rounded shape compared to its predecessor. It offered a spacious and comfortable interior with improved quality materials and finishes. The cabin was well-equipped (for the time), featuring amenities such as power windows and air conditioning.

Under the hood, the VT Commodore offered a range of engine options. The base model was powered by a 3.8-litre V6 engine, delivering okay power and fuel efficiency. There were also higher-performance variants available, including the SS and HSV models, which featured a more powerful V8 engine, offering much better performance and a sportier driving experience.

In terms of safety, it featured standard dual front airbags and optional side airbags, anti-lock brakes (ABS) were also available, providing improved braking performance and control.

Overall, the 1997-2000 Holden VT Commodore was a significant model in the Commodore lineup, representing a notable advancement in terms of design, technology, and performance. It remains a beloved and iconic Australian car, embodying the qualities that made the Commodore series so successful.

Obviously, the VT Commodore launched over 25 years ago, so don’t buy expecting the safest or most feature-soaked car on the road. The major issue with the VT Commodore is that good ones are increasing in value as they’re entering into

The 1997-2000 Holden VT Commodore was a mid-size family sedan produced by Holden. It was the seventh generation of the popular Commodore series and was a significant step forward in terms of design, technology, and performance.

The VT Commodore featured a sleek and aerodynamic exterior design, with a more rounded shape compared to its predecessor. It offered a spacious and comfortable interior with improved quality materials and finishes. The cabin was well-equipped (for the time), featuring amenities such as power windows and air conditioning.

Under the hood, the VT Commodore offered a range of engine options. The base model was powered by a 3.8-litre V6 engine, delivering okay power and fuel efficiency. There were also higher-performance variants available, including the SS and HSV models, which featured a more powerful V8 engine, offering much better performance and a sportier driving experience.

In terms of safety, it featured standard dual front airbags and optional side airbags, anti-lock brakes (ABS) were also available, providing improved braking performance and control.

Overall, the 1997-2000 Holden VT Commodore was a significant model in the Commodore lineup, representing a notable advancement in terms of design, technology, and performance. It remains a beloved and iconic Australian car, embodying the qualities that made the Commodore series so successful.

Obviously, the VT Commodore launched over 25 years ago, so don’t buy expecting the safest or most feature-soaked car on the road. The major issue with the VT Commodore is that good ones are increasing in value as they’re entering into a phase of collectability, especially S, SS and HSV models. This review will focus on the standard Commodore VT models only, not the HSV models.

The 1997-2000 Holden VT Commodore was a mid-size family sedan produced by Holden. It was the seventh generation of the popular Commodore series and was a significant step forward in terms of design, technology, and performance.

The VT Commodore featured a sleek and aerodynamic exterior design, with a more rounded shape compared to its predecessor. It offered a spacious and comfortable interior with improved quality materials and finishes. The cabin was well-equipped (for the time), featuring amenities such as power windows and air conditioning.

Under the hood, the VT Commodore offered a range of engine options. The base model was powered by a 3.8-litre V6 engine, delivering okay power and fuel efficiency. There were also higher-performance variants available, including the SS and HSV models, which featured a more powerful V8 engine, offering much better performance and a sportier driving experience.

In terms of safety, it featured standard dual front airbags and optional side airbags, anti-lock brakes (ABS) were also available, providing improved braking performance and control.

Overall, the 1997-2000 Holden VT Commodore was a significant model in the Commodore lineup, representing a notable advancement in terms of design, technology, and performance. It remains a beloved and iconic Australian car, embodying the qualities that made the Commodore series so successful.

Obviously, the VT Commodore launched over 25 years ago, so don’t buy expecting the safest or most feature-soaked car on the road. The major issue with the VT Commodore is that good ones are increasing in value as they’re entering into a phase of collectability, especially S, SS and HSV models. This review will focus on the standard Commodore VT models only, not the HSV models.

Exterior:

Being close to 25 years old, the exterior of the VT Commodore should be checked for dodgy repairs and any evidence of poorly fitted mods. Many drove the VT Commodore with next to no mechanical sympathy, so trips into other cars, gutters, and bushes may have been frequent.

Go over the exterior of the Commodore with a fine-toothed comb and make sure you get a pre-purchase inspection done if you’re in the market for one.

Interior:

The ABS warning light would stay on due to a sensor lead contacting the sway bar link. This was remedied in 199 with the addition of a retaining clip.

Mechanically:

  • The chassis rails are prone to rust. In fact with the age of some examples, rust can be a huge issue.
  • There are reports of excessive tyre wear as well as knocking and grinding noises from the suspension.
  • Worn bearings in the steering column can cause play in the steering.
  • The V6 engine can have oil leaks thanks to dodgy seals.
  • V6s can have a ringing noise at idle because the drive belt may be slapping against the aircon pulley.
  • The V8s have been reported to use excessive oil as well as have some coolant leaks.
  • On early versions of the V8s, they could leak power steering fluid. From 1999, this issue was rectified.

Exterior:

Being close to 25 years old, the exterior of the VT Commodore should be checked for dodgy repairs and any evidence of poorly fitted mods. Many drove the VT Commodore with next to no mechanical sympathy, so trips into other cars, gutters, and bushes may have been frequent.

Go over the exterior of the Commodore with a fine-toothed comb and make sure you get a pre-purchase inspection done if you’re in the market for one.

Interior:

The ABS warning light would stay on due to a sensor lead contacting the sway bar link. This was remedied in 199 with the addition of a retaining clip.

Mechanically:

  • The chassis rails are prone to rust. In fact with the age of some examples, rust can be a huge issue.
  • There are reports of excessive tyre wear as well as knocking and grinding noises from the suspension.
  • Worn bearings in the steering column can cause play in the steering.
  • The V6 engine can have oil leaks thanks to dodgy seals.
  • V6s can have a ringing noise at idle because the drive belt may be slapping against the aircon pulley.
  • The V8s have been reported to use excessive oil as well as have some coolant leaks.
  • On early versions of the V8s, they could leak power steering fluid. From 1999, this issue was rectified.

Exterior:

Being close to 25 years old, the exterior of the VT Commodore should be checked for dodgy repairs and any evidence of poorly fitted mods. Many drove the VT Commodore with next to no mechanical sympathy, so trips into other cars, gutters, and bushes may have been frequent.

Go over the exterior of the Commodore with a fine-toothed comb and make sure you get a pre-purchase inspection done if you’re in the market for one.

Interior:

The ABS warning light would stay on due to a sensor lead contacting the sway bar link. This was remedied in 199 with the addition of a retaining clip.

Mechanically:

  • The chassis rails are prone to rust. In fact with the age of some examples, rust can be a huge issue.
  • There are reports of excessive tyre wear as well as knocking and grinding noises from the suspension.
  • Worn bearings in the steering column can cause play in the steering.
  • The V6 engine can have oil leaks thanks to dodgy seals.
  • V6s can have a ringing noise at idle because the drive belt may be slapping against the aircon pulley.
  • The V8s have been reported to use excessive oil as well as have some coolant leaks.
  • On early versions of the V8s, they could leak power steering fluid. From 1999, this issue was rectified.

Body Styles

4 door Sedan

5 door Wagon

Engines

3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Power

147kW – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

179kW – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

171kW – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

220kW – 5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Torque

304Nm – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

400Nm – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

375Nm – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

430Nm – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (SS, Berlina, Executive)

446Nm – 5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Transmissions

5-speed Manual (Executive, S, SS)

4-speed Automatic

6-speed Manual (Executive, SS)

Fuel Consumption

8.2 – 11.5L / 100km

Length

4884mm (4 door Sedan)

5042mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

1842mm (4 door Sedan)

1847mm (5 door Wagon)

Height

1450mm (4 door Sedan)

1545mm (5 door Wagon)

Wheelbase

2788mm (4 door Sedan)

2788 – 2938mm (5 door Wagon)

Kerb Weight

1512 – 1722kg (4 door Sedan)

1572 – 1766kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

500kg (unbraked), 2100kg (braked)

ANCAP Ratings

Not available

Body Styles

4 door Sedan

5 door Wagon

Engines

3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Power

147kW – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

179kW – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

171kW – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

220kW – 5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Torque

304Nm – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

400Nm – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

375Nm – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

430Nm – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (SS, Berlina, Executive)

446Nm – 5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Transmissions

5-speed Manual (Executive, S, SS)

4-speed Automatic

6-speed Manual (Executive, SS)

Fuel Consumption

8.2 – 11.5L / 100km

Length

4884mm (4 door Sedan)

5042mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

1842mm (4 door Sedan)

1847mm (5 door Wagon)

Height

1450mm (4 door Sedan)

1545mm (5 door Wagon)

Wheelbase

2788mm (4 door Sedan)

2788 – 2938mm (5 door Wagon)

Kerb Weight

1512 – 1722kg (4 door Sedan)

1572 – 1766kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

500kg (unbraked), 2100kg (braked)

ANCAP Ratings

Not available

Body Styles

4 door Sedan

5 door Wagon

Engines

3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Power

147kW – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

179kW – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

171kW – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

220kW – 5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Torque

304Nm – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Executive, Acclaim, S, Berlina, 50th Anniversary, Equipe, Olympic)

400Nm – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

375Nm – 3.8 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, SS, Berlina)

430Nm – 5.0 litre 8-cylinder petrol (SS, Berlina, Executive)

446Nm – 5.7 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Executive, SS, Berlina)

Transmissions

5-speed Manual (Executive, S, SS)

4-speed Automatic

6-speed Manual (Executive, SS)

Fuel Consumption

8.2 – 11.5L / 100km

Length

4884mm (4 door Sedan)

5042mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

1842mm (4 door Sedan)

1847mm (5 door Wagon)

Height

1450mm (4 door Sedan)

1545mm (5 door Wagon)

Wheelbase

2788mm (4 door Sedan)

2788 – 2938mm (5 door Wagon)

Kerb Weight

1512 – 1722kg (4 door Sedan)

1572 – 1766kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

500kg (unbraked), 2100kg (braked)

ANCAP Ratings

Not available

Warranty

3 years / 100,000 km

Service Intervals

Not available

Model range, pricing & features

1997-2000 Holden Commodore VT-5

Executive

Price when new: $28,330 - $36,440

Price used: $300 - $3,200

Equipment:

4 Speaker Stereo
Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt & Reach
Airbag – Driver
Body Colour – Bumpers
Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
Disc Brakes Rear Solid
Electric Seat – Drivers
Engine Immobiliser
Independent Rear Suspension
Intermittent Wipers
On-board Computer
Power Door Mirrors
Power Steering
Radio Cassette
Remote Boot/Hatch Release
Remote Fuel Lid Release
Tacho
Trim – Velour
Trip Computer
6 Speaker Stereo

Olympic

Price when new: $29,620 - $32,830

Price used: $300 - $3,200

Adds:

16″ Alloy Wheels
Air Conditioning
CD Player
Cruise Control
Power Antenna
Power Windows – Front & Rear
15″ Alloy Wheels
Roof Racks

Equipe

Price when new: $31,500 - $33,340

Price used: $200 - $3,100

50th Anniversary

Price when new: $32,500 - $34,340

Price used: $200 - $3,100

Adds:

Alloy Wheels

S

Price when new: $33,850 - $38,800

Price used: $300 - $4,400

Adds:

Body Kit – F&R Spoilers, Skirts, Rear Apron
Leather Steering Wheel
Suspension – Sports
Spoiler – Rear

Acclaim

Price when new: $33,980 - $38,010

Price used: $200 - $3,100

Adds:

ABS (Antilock Brakes)
Airbag – Passenger
Automatic Transmission
Control – Traction
Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
Body Colour – Fittings

Berlina

Price when new: $37,880 - $46,700

Price used: $200 - $7,400

Adds:

Air Cond. – Climate Control
Alarm
Intermittent Wipers – Variable
Paint – Metallic
Woodgrain – Inserts

SS

Price when new: $44,160 - $46,650

Price used: $4,100 - $15,900

Adds:

Fog Lamps – Front
Limited Slip Diff
Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
17″ Alloy Wheels

If you’re looking buying a Holden VT Commodore, it’s likely you fall into one of two camps. You’re either looking for one of the ‘normal’ models as a dependable family car, for not too much money, or you’re looking for a mint condition example of one of the more special VT Commodores like an SS or HSV model.

The issue is that any of the normal variants, even the decent ones are increasing in value, to the point where you’re better off buying a slightly newer Toyota Camry for similar of less money. The VT Commodores that are affordable, probably have a load of kilometres and are falling apart, so should be avoided.

If you’re the special ones, you’re probably looking at it from a collector’s point of view, so you’re probably not looking at it as a daily family car.

At least on paper, the VT Commodore is a no-nonsense, solid family car, with many owners still praising its longevity. If you do buy one, just know you’re buying a car pushing 25 years old, where many examples have been abused and driven to within an inch of their lives. It will have basically no modern safety aids and no mod-cons.

If you’re looking buying a Holden VT Commodore, it’s likely you fall into one of two camps. You’re either looking for one of the ‘normal’ models as a dependable family car, for not too much money, or you’re looking for a mint condition example of one of the more special VT Commodores like an SS or HSV model.

The issue is that any of the normal variants, even the decent ones are increasing in value, to the point where you’re better off buying a slightly newer Toyota Camry for similar of less money. The VT Commodores that are affordable, probably have a load of kilometres and are falling apart, so should be avoided.

If you’re the special ones, you’re probably looking at it from a collector’s point of view, so you’re probably not looking at it as a daily family car.

At least on paper, the VT Commodore is a no-nonsense, solid family car, with many owners still praising its longevity. If you do buy one, just know you’re buying a car pushing 25 years old, where many examples have been abused and driven to within an inch of their lives. It will have basically no modern safety aids and no mod-cons.

If you’re looking buying a Holden VT Commodore, it’s likely you fall into one of two camps. You’re either looking for one of the ‘normal’ models as a dependable family car, for not too much money, or you’re looking for a mint condition example of one of the more special VT Commodores like an SS or HSV model.

The issue is that any of the normal variants, even the decent ones are increasing in value, to the point where you’re better off buying a slightly newer Toyota Camry for similar of less money. The VT Commodores that are affordable, probably have a load of kilometres and are falling apart, so should be avoided.

If you’re the special ones, you’re probably looking at it from a collector’s point of view, so you’re probably not looking at it as a daily family car.

At least on paper, the VT Commodore is a no-nonsense, solid family car, with many owners still praising its longevity. If you do buy one, just know you’re buying a car pushing 25 years old, where many examples have been abused and driven to within an inch of their lives. It will have basically no modern safety aids and no mod-cons.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of June 27, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

Related Blog Articles Latest from ReDriven Blog

Join the ReDriven Community

© 2024 ReDriven All Rights Reserved