Pros

  • Much more refined over the previous Aussie-made iteration
  • All-wheel-drive variants offered a safer and more fuel-efficient alternative to the prior rear-wheel-drive setup
  • Offers truly incredible value for money on the used market.
  • The list of features and equipment is extensive, arguably class leading.

Cons

  • European underpinnings won’t appease Aussie-made-car purists
  • No longer had the option of a V8 engine
  • Wide range of build quality and reliability concerns.
  • Accessing parts and support may become an issue leading into the future

Verdict

Before we offer our recommendation on whether to consider purchasing a Holden Commodore ZB, let’s explore alternative options.

The Audi A7, BMW 435i, Volkswagen Passat R36, and Volvo T60 meet the criteria, but considering the ZB’s asking prices, these alternatives are likely to be older and less equipped. Furthermore, each...

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  • The ZB Holden Commodore, produced by General Motors in Germany from 2018 to 2020, served as the twelfth generation of the well-known Commodore model.
  • This mid to large-size family car marked a departure from previous Commodores, as Holden transitioned from locally manufactured to imported models, basing the ZB on the Opel Insignia.
  • The design of the Commodore ZB featured a sleek and modern aesthetic, characterised by a more aerodynamic profile compared to its predecessors.
  • Both lift-back sedan and wagon body styles were offered, providing immense levels of practicality.
  • Notably, the ZB shifted from a rear-wheel drive platform to a front-wheel or all-wheel drive configuration, eliciting mixed reactions from enthusiasts to say the least. However, this change brought improved fuel efficiency and enhanced traction in various driving conditions.
  • The Commodore ZB’s engine options included a turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine, a V6 petrol engine, and a diesel engine. Transmission choices ranged from a six-speed manual to a nine-speed automatic, however, all have their own reliability idiosyncrasies.
  • Inside, the Commodore ZB boasted a spacious cabin with a class leading array of modern amenities and advanced technology. It accommodated five passengers comfortably and featured safety elements like autonomous emergency braking, lane-keep assist, adaptive cruise control, and blind-spot monitoring. The infotainment system offered touchscreen controls, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto integration, and other connectivity options.
  • Despite positive reviews for its handling, safety features, and technology, the Commodore ZB faced challenges in the Australian market, including shifting consumer preferences towards SUVs, the cessation of local manufacturing, and
  • The ZB Holden Commodore, produced by General Motors in Germany from 2018 to 2020, served as the twelfth generation of the well-known Commodore model.
  • This mid to large-size family car marked a departure from previous Commodores, as Holden transitioned from locally manufactured to imported models, basing the ZB on the Opel Insignia.
  • The design of the Commodore ZB featured a sleek and modern aesthetic, characterised by a more aerodynamic profile compared to its predecessors.
  • Both lift-back sedan and wagon body styles were offered, providing immense levels of practicality.
  • Notably, the ZB shifted from a rear-wheel drive platform to a front-wheel or all-wheel drive configuration, eliciting mixed reactions from enthusiasts to say the least. However, this change brought improved fuel efficiency and enhanced traction in various driving conditions.
  • The Commodore ZB’s engine options included a turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine, a V6 petrol engine, and a diesel engine. Transmission choices ranged from a six-speed manual to a nine-speed automatic, however, all have their own reliability idiosyncrasies.
  • Inside, the Commodore ZB boasted a spacious cabin with a class leading array of modern amenities and advanced technology. It accommodated five passengers comfortably and featured safety elements like autonomous emergency braking, lane-keep assist, adaptive cruise control, and blind-spot monitoring. The infotainment system offered touchscreen controls, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto integration, and other connectivity options.
  • Despite positive reviews for its handling, safety features, and technology, the Commodore ZB faced challenges in the Australian market, including shifting consumer preferences towards SUVs, the cessation of local manufacturing, and increased competition. Consequently, Holden ceased production and sales of the Commodore ZB in 2020, marking the conclusion of an era for this iconic Australian car.
  • The ZB Holden Commodore, produced by General Motors in Germany from 2018 to 2020, served as the twelfth generation of the well-known Commodore model.
  • This mid to large-size family car marked a departure from previous Commodores, as Holden transitioned from locally manufactured to imported models, basing the ZB on the Opel Insignia.
  • The design of the Commodore ZB featured a sleek and modern aesthetic, characterised by a more aerodynamic profile compared to its predecessors.
  • Both lift-back sedan and wagon body styles were offered, providing immense levels of practicality.
  • Notably, the ZB shifted from a rear-wheel drive platform to a front-wheel or all-wheel drive configuration, eliciting mixed reactions from enthusiasts to say the least. However, this change brought improved fuel efficiency and enhanced traction in various driving conditions.
  • The Commodore ZB’s engine options included a turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine, a V6 petrol engine, and a diesel engine. Transmission choices ranged from a six-speed manual to a nine-speed automatic, however, all have their own reliability idiosyncrasies.
  • Inside, the Commodore ZB boasted a spacious cabin with a class leading array of modern amenities and advanced technology. It accommodated five passengers comfortably and featured safety elements like autonomous emergency braking, lane-keep assist, adaptive cruise control, and blind-spot monitoring. The infotainment system offered touchscreen controls, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto integration, and other connectivity options.
  • Despite positive reviews for its handling, safety features, and technology, the Commodore ZB faced challenges in the Australian market, including shifting consumer preferences towards SUVs, the cessation of local manufacturing, and increased competition. Consequently, Holden ceased production and sales of the Commodore ZB in 2020, marking the conclusion of an era for this iconic Australian car.

Exterior:

  • Paint Quality:
    • Some reports indicate that the paint on the Holden Commodore ZB is susceptible to easy scratching, with clear coat and paint fading and peeling, especially around water channels and the windscreen.
    • Sun exposure appears to exacerbate these issues, and cars regularly garaged and well-maintained seem to be less affected.
    • Concerns arise about potential costs for a quality full respray or wrap if peeling issues persist.
  • Tail Lights and Body Kit Parts:
    • Owners have reported instances of water leakage through the tail lights, potentially due to seal issues.
    • Sporadic reports mention body kit parts coming loose or rims cracking, though these aren’t considered common complaints.

 

Inside:

  • Air Conditioning Issues:
    • Failing air conditioning is a common issue, often attributed to a/c lines being routed too close to the engine, leading to rubbing and gas leaks.
    • Problems typically arise around the 80,000km mark, but many have been resolved under warranty or during routine servicing.
    • Some owners have reported issues with air conditioning condensers.
  • Electrical Gremlins and Interior Trims:
    • Occasional reports mention odd electrical glitches, such as the start/stop system not working or infotainment glitches, though these are not widespread.
    • Some owners have experienced rattles and squeaks, possibly due to loose plastic clips or modules controlling the infotainment and stereo coming loose under the dash.
    • Few reports of interior trim plastics lifting and center console covers not closing, but these are not considered common issues.
  • Overall Reliability:
    • Despite some reported issues, a majority of owners report a fault-free ownership experience.

 

Mechanically:

  • 2.0 Petrol Turbo 4 Cylinder:
    • Part of the Ecotec engine family, historically known for reliability issues, though the ZB’s version is improved.
    • Occasional problems with timing chains, turbos, and oil consumption, often linked to poor servicing.
    • Rare issues include high-pressure fuel pump failures and reports of throttle body and APP glitches.
  • Diesel Engine:
    • Manufactured by Fiat, known for injector seal and oil leak problems, common to other vehicles.
    • Generally reliable but may face challenges with unique components in this specific model in Australia.
    • Timing belt replacement required every 120,000km.
  • V6 Engine:
    • Significantly different from previous Commodore 6-cylinders, with redesigned timing chains (now 2, not 3) and fewer reported complications.
    • Common issues include thermostat failure, cooling problems (often covered under warranty), and potential future carbon buildup due to direct injection.
    • Recall for brake booster and ABS control module complications.
    • Increasing reports of transmission and rear diff issues on all-wheel drive models, with fluid changes sometimes resolving odd noises.
    • Occasional shift selector position complications, typically manageable in-cabin issues.
  • Parts and Support:

Exterior:

  • Paint Quality:
    • Some reports indicate that the paint on the Holden Commodore ZB is susceptible to easy scratching, with clear coat and paint fading and peeling, especially around water channels and the windscreen.
    • Sun exposure appears to exacerbate these issues, and cars regularly garaged and well-maintained seem to be less affected.
    • Concerns arise about potential costs for a quality full respray or wrap if peeling issues persist.
  • Tail Lights and Body Kit Parts:
    • Owners have reported instances of water leakage through the tail lights, potentially due to seal issues.
    • Sporadic reports mention body kit parts coming loose or rims cracking, though these aren’t considered common complaints.

 

Inside:

  • Air Conditioning Issues:
    • Failing air conditioning is a common issue, often attributed to a/c lines being routed too close to the engine, leading to rubbing and gas leaks.
    • Problems typically arise around the 80,000km mark, but many have been resolved under warranty or during routine servicing.
    • Some owners have reported issues with air conditioning condensers.
  • Electrical Gremlins and Interior Trims:
    • Occasional reports mention odd electrical glitches, such as the start/stop system not working or infotainment glitches, though these are not widespread.
    • Some owners have experienced rattles and squeaks, possibly due to loose plastic clips or modules controlling the infotainment and stereo coming loose under the dash.
    • Few reports of interior trim plastics lifting and center console covers not closing, but these are not considered common issues.
  • Overall Reliability:
    • Despite some reported issues, a majority of owners report a fault-free ownership experience.

 

Mechanically:

  • 2.0 Petrol Turbo 4 Cylinder:
    • Part of the Ecotec engine family, historically known for reliability issues, though the ZB’s version is improved.
    • Occasional problems with timing chains, turbos, and oil consumption, often linked to poor servicing.
    • Rare issues include high-pressure fuel pump failures and reports of throttle body and APP glitches.
  • Diesel Engine:
    • Manufactured by Fiat, known for injector seal and oil leak problems, common to other vehicles.
    • Generally reliable but may face challenges with unique components in this specific model in Australia.
    • Timing belt replacement required every 120,000km.
  • V6 Engine:
    • Significantly different from previous Commodore 6-cylinders, with redesigned timing chains (now 2, not 3) and fewer reported complications.
    • Common issues include thermostat failure, cooling problems (often covered under warranty), and potential future carbon buildup due to direct injection.
    • Recall for brake booster and ABS control module complications.
    • Increasing reports of transmission and rear diff issues on all-wheel drive models, with fluid changes sometimes resolving odd noises.
    • Occasional shift selector position complications, typically manageable in-cabin issues.
  • Parts and Support:
    • A major concern is the availability of parts and support since Holden no longer exists.
    • While the ZB’s platform and powertrains are still in production globally, obtaining parts locally can be costly and time-consuming, considering shipping expenses and potential delays.

 

Recalls:

  • April 2018 – Incorrectly installed seatbelts in 2,194 Holden Commodore vehicles may increase the risk of injury to passengers in the rear left and right seats during accidents.
  • October 2018 – Holden Commodore: Fuel hose clip rubbing on fuel pump return hose may cause fuel leak and fire hazard.
  • November 2019 – Improperly welded cross-member in Holden ZB COMMODORE and BK ASTRA models may increase the risk of injury to occupants in rear-impact accidents.
  • January 2020 – Fuel hose clip rubbing on the fuel pump return hose in Holden Commodore models from 2018 to 2020 may cause a fuel leak, posing a potential risk of fire and injury to occupants and property.
  • August 2022 – Holden ZB Commodore (2017-2020) has a manufacturing defect in the brake booster, affecting 13,898 units, which could lead to increased stopping distance and pose a risk of accidents causing serious injury or death.

Exterior:

  • Paint Quality:
    • Some reports indicate that the paint on the Holden Commodore ZB is susceptible to easy scratching, with clear coat and paint fading and peeling, especially around water channels and the windscreen.
    • Sun exposure appears to exacerbate these issues, and cars regularly garaged and well-maintained seem to be less affected.
    • Concerns arise about potential costs for a quality full respray or wrap if peeling issues persist.
  • Tail Lights and Body Kit Parts:
    • Owners have reported instances of water leakage through the tail lights, potentially due to seal issues.
    • Sporadic reports mention body kit parts coming loose or rims cracking, though these aren’t considered common complaints.

 

Inside:

  • Air Conditioning Issues:
    • Failing air conditioning is a common issue, often attributed to a/c lines being routed too close to the engine, leading to rubbing and gas leaks.
    • Problems typically arise around the 80,000km mark, but many have been resolved under warranty or during routine servicing.
    • Some owners have reported issues with air conditioning condensers.
  • Electrical Gremlins and Interior Trims:
    • Occasional reports mention odd electrical glitches, such as the start/stop system not working or infotainment glitches, though these are not widespread.
    • Some owners have experienced rattles and squeaks, possibly due to loose plastic clips or modules controlling the infotainment and stereo coming loose under the dash.
    • Few reports of interior trim plastics lifting and center console covers not closing, but these are not considered common issues.
  • Overall Reliability:
    • Despite some reported issues, a majority of owners report a fault-free ownership experience.

 

Mechanically:

  • 2.0 Petrol Turbo 4 Cylinder:
    • Part of the Ecotec engine family, historically known for reliability issues, though the ZB’s version is improved.
    • Occasional problems with timing chains, turbos, and oil consumption, often linked to poor servicing.
    • Rare issues include high-pressure fuel pump failures and reports of throttle body and APP glitches.
  • Diesel Engine:
    • Manufactured by Fiat, known for injector seal and oil leak problems, common to other vehicles.
    • Generally reliable but may face challenges with unique components in this specific model in Australia.
    • Timing belt replacement required every 120,000km.
  • V6 Engine:
    • Significantly different from previous Commodore 6-cylinders, with redesigned timing chains (now 2, not 3) and fewer reported complications.
    • Common issues include thermostat failure, cooling problems (often covered under warranty), and potential future carbon buildup due to direct injection.
    • Recall for brake booster and ABS control module complications.
    • Increasing reports of transmission and rear diff issues on all-wheel drive models, with fluid changes sometimes resolving odd noises.
    • Occasional shift selector position complications, typically manageable in-cabin issues.
  • Parts and Support:
    • A major concern is the availability of parts and support since Holden no longer exists.
    • While the ZB’s platform and powertrains are still in production globally, obtaining parts locally can be costly and time-consuming, considering shipping expenses and potential delays.

 

Recalls:

  • April 2018 – Incorrectly installed seatbelts in 2,194 Holden Commodore vehicles may increase the risk of injury to passengers in the rear left and right seats during accidents.
  • October 2018 – Holden Commodore: Fuel hose clip rubbing on fuel pump return hose may cause fuel leak and fire hazard.
  • November 2019 – Improperly welded cross-member in Holden ZB COMMODORE and BK ASTRA models may increase the risk of injury to occupants in rear-impact accidents.
  • January 2020 – Fuel hose clip rubbing on the fuel pump return hose in Holden Commodore models from 2018 to 2020 may cause a fuel leak, posing a potential risk of fire and injury to occupants and property.
  • August 2022 – Holden ZB Commodore (2017-2020) has a manufacturing defect in the brake booster, affecting 13,898 units, which could lead to increased stopping distance and pose a risk of accidents causing serious injury or death.

Body Styles

  • 5 door Liftback
  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 191kW / 350Nm (LT 2017 – 2020, RS 2017 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 125kW / 400Nm (LT 2017 – 2018)
  • 3.6 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 235kW / 381Nm (RS 2017 – 2020, RS-V 2017 – 2020, VXR 2017 – 2020)

Transmission

  • 9-speed Sports Automatic (LT, RS, RS-V, VXR)
  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (LT)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.6 – 9.5 / 100km (LT)
  • 6.8 – 9.9 / 100km (RS)
  • 7.3 – 12.3 / 100km (RS-V)
  • 7.4 – 12.6 / 100km (VXR)

Length

  • 4897mm (5 door Liftback)
  • 4986mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

  • 1863mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1455mm (5 door Liftback)
  • 1483mm (5 door Wagon)

Wheelbase

  • 2829mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1515kg – 1737kg (5 door Liftback)
  • 1535kg – 1705kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2100kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • 5 stars, tested 2017 (All Models)

Body Styles

  • 5 door Liftback
  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 191kW / 350Nm (LT 2017 – 2020, RS 2017 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 125kW / 400Nm (LT 2017 – 2018)
  • 3.6 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 235kW / 381Nm (RS 2017 – 2020, RS-V 2017 – 2020, VXR 2017 – 2020)

Transmission

  • 9-speed Sports Automatic (LT, RS, RS-V, VXR)
  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (LT)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.6 – 9.5 / 100km (LT)
  • 6.8 – 9.9 / 100km (RS)
  • 7.3 – 12.3 / 100km (RS-V)
  • 7.4 – 12.6 / 100km (VXR)

Length

  • 4897mm (5 door Liftback)
  • 4986mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

  • 1863mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1455mm (5 door Liftback)
  • 1483mm (5 door Wagon)

Wheelbase

  • 2829mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1515kg – 1737kg (5 door Liftback)
  • 1535kg – 1705kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2100kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • 5 stars, tested 2017 (All Models)

Body Styles

  • 5 door Liftback
  • 5 door Wagon

Engine Specs

  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo petrol, 191kW / 350Nm (LT 2017 – 2020, RS 2017 – 2020)
  • 2.0 litre, 4-cylinder turbo diesel, 125kW / 400Nm (LT 2017 – 2018)
  • 3.6 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 235kW / 381Nm (RS 2017 – 2020, RS-V 2017 – 2020, VXR 2017 – 2020)

Transmission

  • 9-speed Sports Automatic (LT, RS, RS-V, VXR)
  • 8-speed Sports Automatic (LT)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.6 – 9.5 / 100km (LT)
  • 6.8 – 9.9 / 100km (RS)
  • 7.3 – 12.3 / 100km (RS-V)
  • 7.4 – 12.6 / 100km (VXR)

Length

  • 4897mm (5 door Liftback)
  • 4986mm (5 door Wagon)

Width

  • 1863mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1455mm (5 door Liftback)
  • 1483mm (5 door Wagon)

Wheelbase

  • 2829mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1515kg – 1737kg (5 door Liftback)
  • 1535kg – 1705kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2100kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • 5 stars, tested 2017 (All Models)

Warranty

  • 3 years / 100,000 km (LT, RS, RS-V, VXR)
  • 5 years / unlimited km (LT, RS, RS-V, VXR)

Servicing

  • 12,000 km / 12 months (All Models)

Model range, pricing & features

Holden Commodore ZB-13

LT

Price when new: $33,690

Price used: $18,500 - $23,400

Equipment

  • 17″ Alloy Wheels
  • 7 Speaker Stereo
  • ABS (Antilock Brakes)
  • Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt & Reach
  • Air Cond. – Climate Control 2 Zone
  • Air Conditioning – Sensor for Humidity
  • Airbag – Driver
  • Airbag – Passenger
  • Airbag – Side Driver
  • Airbag – Side Front Passenger
  • Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
  • Airbags – Head for 2nd Row Seats
  • Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
  • Audio – Input for iPod
  • Bluetooth System
  • Body Colour – Door Handles
  • Brake Assist
  • Camera – Rear Vision
  • Central Locking – Key Proximity
  • Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
  • Collision Mitigation – Forward (Low speed)
  • Collision Warning – Forward
  • Control – Electronic Stability
  • Control – Park Distance Front
  • Control – Park Distance Rear
  • Control – Pedestrian Avoidance with Braking
  • Control – Traction
  • Cruise Control
  • Cup Holders – 1st Row
  • Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
  • Disc Brakes Rear Solid
  • Door Pockets – 1st row (Front)
  • Door Pockets – 2nd row (rear)
  • EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
  • Electric Seat – Drivers
  • Engine – Stop Start System (When at idle)
  • Engine Immobiliser
  • Exhaust System – Dual
  • Fog Lamp/s – Rear
  • Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
  • Hill Holder
  • Illuminated Vanity Mirror for Front Passenger
  • Keyless Start:- Key/FOB Proximity related
  • Lane Departure Warning
  • Lane Keeping – Active Assist
  • Multi-function Control Screen – Colour
  • Multi-function Steering Wheel
  • Park Brake – Electric
  • Parking Assist – Graphical Display
  • Parking Assistance – Automated Steering
  • Power Door Mirrors – Heated
  • Power Steering – Electric Assist
  • Power Windows – Front & Rear
  • Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
  • Seat – Driver with Electric Lumbar
  • Seat – Height Adjustable Driver
  • Seatbelt – Load Limiters 1st Row (Front)
  • Seatbelt – Load Limiters 2nd Row(Rear Outer seats)
  • Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
  • Seatbelt – Pretensioners 2nd Row(Rear Outer seats)
  • Seats – 2nd Row Split Fold
  • Smart Device App Display/Control
  • Smart Device Integration – Android Auto
  • Smart Device Integration – Apple CarPlay
  • Spare Wheel – Space Saver/Temporary
  • Speed Limiter
  • Starter Button
  • Sunvisor – Illuminated Vanity Mirror for Driver
  • Tail Lamps – LED
  • Trim – Cloth
  • Trip Computer
  • Voice Recognition

RS

Price when new: $37,290

Price used: $20,600 - $25,900

Adds

  • 18″ Alloy Wheels
  • Blind Spot Sensor
  • Body Kit – Lower (skirts
  • F & R Aprons)
  • Leather Look – Seats Partial
  • Power Door Mirrors – Folding
  • Seatback Pocket – Front Driver Seat
  • Seatback Pocket – Front Passenger Seat
  • Spoiler – Rear
  • Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
  • Steering Wheel – Sports
  • Warning – Rear Cross Traffic (when reversing)

RS-V

Price when new: $46,990

Price used: $27,700 - $33,800

Adds

  • Active Noise Cancellation
  • Ambient Lighting – Interior
  • Digital Instrument Display – Partial
  • GPS (Satellite Navigation)
  • Gear Shift Paddles behind Steering Wheel
  • Heated Seats – 1st Row
  • Information Display – Head Up
  • Leather Seats – Partial
  • Pedals – Sports
  • Radio – Digital (DAB+)
  • Seats – 2nd Row (Rear) Flat Folding
  • Suspension – Sports
  • Wireless Charging – Compatible Devices

VXR

Price when new: $55,990

Price used: $35,000 - $41,100

Adds

  • 20″ Alloy Wheels
  • Camera – Side Vision
  • Collision Mitigation – Forward (High speed)
  • Control – Electronic Damper
  • Cruise Control – Distance Control
  • Driving Mode – Selectable
  • Electric Seat – Drivers with Massaging
  • Electric Seat – Drivers with Memory
  • Floor Mats
  • Headlamp – High Beam Auto Dipping
  • Headlamps – Active (Cornering/steering)
  • Headlamps – LED
  • Heated Seats – 2nd Row
  • Performance Brakes
  • Power Door Mirrors – with Memory
  • Premium Sound System
  • Scuff Plates – Embossed or personalised
  • Seat – Bolsters Adjustable for Driver
  • Seat – Bolsters Adjustable for Front Passenger
  • Seat – Ventilated Drivers Side
  • Seat – Ventilated Passenger Side
  • Sunroof – Electric
  • Tyre Repair Kit

MY19 update

  • Calipers – Painted Front
  • Calipers – Painted Rear

Before we offer our recommendation on whether to consider purchasing a Holden Commodore ZB, let’s explore alternative options.

The Audi A7, BMW 435i, Volkswagen Passat R36, and Volvo T60 meet the criteria, but considering the ZB’s asking prices, these alternatives are likely to be older and less equipped. Furthermore, each of them has its own reliability issues, presenting challenges in accessing parts and potentially incurring a premium cost for fitting them.

On the other hand, the Skoda Superb and Volkswagen Passat 206TSI are viable alternatives of a similar age. However, the ZB stands out by offering superior equipment and potentially lower kilometers for a comparable price.

Despite potential concerns regarding reliability, parts availability, and the occasional lemon that should be avoided, the Holden ZB Commodore remains a solid and refined car. While some Holden purists may resist acknowledging it, the ZB represents the best version of the Commodore that was available in Australia, especially in the ‘normal’ models. Special variants like SS or HSV models were truly exceptional, but they belong to a different era.

The ZB Commodore outshines its predecessors in refinement, safety, and efficiency. However, it faced challenges, including a declining interest in family sedans and wagons and the overall struggle of an ailing company. Unfortunately, the ZB’s fate seemed sealed from the moment it launched.

Should you consider buying one? Typically, our assessment is based on the car’s attributes, which, in this case, are commendable. However, the significant drawback lies in the reported abysmal aftersales support. This

Before we offer our recommendation on whether to consider purchasing a Holden Commodore ZB, let’s explore alternative options.

The Audi A7, BMW 435i, Volkswagen Passat R36, and Volvo T60 meet the criteria, but considering the ZB’s asking prices, these alternatives are likely to be older and less equipped. Furthermore, each of them has its own reliability issues, presenting challenges in accessing parts and potentially incurring a premium cost for fitting them.

On the other hand, the Skoda Superb and Volkswagen Passat 206TSI are viable alternatives of a similar age. However, the ZB stands out by offering superior equipment and potentially lower kilometers for a comparable price.

Despite potential concerns regarding reliability, parts availability, and the occasional lemon that should be avoided, the Holden ZB Commodore remains a solid and refined car. While some Holden purists may resist acknowledging it, the ZB represents the best version of the Commodore that was available in Australia, especially in the ‘normal’ models. Special variants like SS or HSV models were truly exceptional, but they belong to a different era.

The ZB Commodore outshines its predecessors in refinement, safety, and efficiency. However, it faced challenges, including a declining interest in family sedans and wagons and the overall struggle of an ailing company. Unfortunately, the ZB’s fate seemed sealed from the moment it launched.

Should you consider buying one? Typically, our assessment is based on the car’s attributes, which, in this case, are commendable. However, the significant drawback lies in the reported abysmal aftersales support. This extends not only to the Commodore but other Holden models as well. Relying on wreckers for parts, ordering new parts from Germany, and uncertainty about warranty honors create substantial hurdles.

If you can overlook these challenges, the ZB Commodore offers a great driving experience. However, if you seek an ownership experience where the manufacturer genuinely supports you, Holden might not be the ideal choice.

Owning a ZB requires high levels of care, maintenance, and commitment, but considering the extraordinary value it offers for the money, we cautiously suggest a yes—provided you choose the right example. While it may not reach Japanese levels of build quality or reliability, one owner aptly described the ZB as the lowest traveled, newest, best value, and highest-featured car available for the money.

Before we offer our recommendation on whether to consider purchasing a Holden Commodore ZB, let’s explore alternative options.

The Audi A7, BMW 435i, Volkswagen Passat R36, and Volvo T60 meet the criteria, but considering the ZB’s asking prices, these alternatives are likely to be older and less equipped. Furthermore, each of them has its own reliability issues, presenting challenges in accessing parts and potentially incurring a premium cost for fitting them.

On the other hand, the Skoda Superb and Volkswagen Passat 206TSI are viable alternatives of a similar age. However, the ZB stands out by offering superior equipment and potentially lower kilometers for a comparable price.

Despite potential concerns regarding reliability, parts availability, and the occasional lemon that should be avoided, the Holden ZB Commodore remains a solid and refined car. While some Holden purists may resist acknowledging it, the ZB represents the best version of the Commodore that was available in Australia, especially in the ‘normal’ models. Special variants like SS or HSV models were truly exceptional, but they belong to a different era.

The ZB Commodore outshines its predecessors in refinement, safety, and efficiency. However, it faced challenges, including a declining interest in family sedans and wagons and the overall struggle of an ailing company. Unfortunately, the ZB’s fate seemed sealed from the moment it launched.

Should you consider buying one? Typically, our assessment is based on the car’s attributes, which, in this case, are commendable. However, the significant drawback lies in the reported abysmal aftersales support. This extends not only to the Commodore but other Holden models as well. Relying on wreckers for parts, ordering new parts from Germany, and uncertainty about warranty honors create substantial hurdles.

If you can overlook these challenges, the ZB Commodore offers a great driving experience. However, if you seek an ownership experience where the manufacturer genuinely supports you, Holden might not be the ideal choice.

Owning a ZB requires high levels of care, maintenance, and commitment, but considering the extraordinary value it offers for the money, we cautiously suggest a yes—provided you choose the right example. While it may not reach Japanese levels of build quality or reliability, one owner aptly described the ZB as the lowest traveled, newest, best value, and highest-featured car available for the money.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of Jan 26, 2024.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

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