Pros

  • In all-wheel-drive form, offers genuine off-roading ability
  • Funky styling and that rugged Jeep image
  • Clever and efficient practicality
  • Low pricing on the used market compared to much of the competition

Cons

  • Jeep has a disappointing reputation for reliability
  • Aside from off-road ability, other SUVs are recommended
  • Build quality can be highly inconsistent
  • Long list of common issues and recalls

Verdict

So should you buy one? For the majority, absolutely not, you shouldn’t buy a Cherokee, but for a select few, yes, you should.

The Cherokee is simply the most capable SUV of this size category, especially in Trailhawk spec, and if you genuinely require more than impressive off-roading chops while...

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2020

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This is the 5th generation KL Cherokee landed here in Australia back in 2014 and production finished at the Illinois plant during 2023.

Engine wise, most Cherokees on the market will feature a 3.2-litre petrol 6-cylinder powering all four wheels, however there are a range of front-wheel drive 2.4-litre petrol 4-cylinders available while an all-wheel drive 2.0-litre turbo diesel made an appearance in 2014 although it was discontinued a year later.

Regardless of the engine fitted, all Cherokees are mated to a 9-speed automatic.

Depending on the model year, there is a choice of no less than nine variants to select from, offering everything from the bare basics in the front-wheel drive Sport through to all of the bells and whistles in the S-Limited and if heading into the wilderness is your cup of tea, check out the off-roading focussed Trailhawk.

Even though the Cherokee is predominantly front-wheel drive until clever computers detect that the front wheels have lost traction, depending on the trim spec, it will feature either Jeep’s Active Drive I or 2 system, Active Drive 1 features a single speed power transfer unit, Active Drive 2 features, you guessed it, two speeds, plus a lock mode.

However, the Trailhawk features a locking rear diff, or as Jeep calls it ‘Active Drive Lock’ as well as a host of other off-road specific features.

Also and unlike the vast majority of SUV’s in this size category, all all-wheel drive Cherokee’s feature systems including Jeep’s ‘Selec-Terrain’ traction control system, which

This is the 5th generation KL Cherokee landed here in Australia back in 2014 and production finished at the Illinois plant during 2023.

Engine wise, most Cherokees on the market will feature a 3.2-litre petrol 6-cylinder powering all four wheels, however there are a range of front-wheel drive 2.4-litre petrol 4-cylinders available while an all-wheel drive 2.0-litre turbo diesel made an appearance in 2014 although it was discontinued a year later.

Regardless of the engine fitted, all Cherokees are mated to a 9-speed automatic.

Depending on the model year, there is a choice of no less than nine variants to select from, offering everything from the bare basics in the front-wheel drive Sport through to all of the bells and whistles in the S-Limited and if heading into the wilderness is your cup of tea, check out the off-roading focussed Trailhawk.

Even though the Cherokee is predominantly front-wheel drive until clever computers detect that the front wheels have lost traction, depending on the trim spec, it will feature either Jeep’s Active Drive I or 2 system, Active Drive 1 features a single speed power transfer unit, Active Drive 2 features, you guessed it, two speeds, plus a lock mode.

However, the Trailhawk features a locking rear diff, or as Jeep calls it ‘Active Drive Lock’ as well as a host of other off-road specific features.

Also and unlike the vast majority of SUV’s in this size category, all all-wheel drive Cherokee’s feature systems including Jeep’s ‘Selec-Terrain’ traction control system, which won’t just dominate shopping centre car parks and the kids school run, they allow the Cherokee to genuinely explore the wilderness.

Plus, the Cherokee received a mid cycle update in 2018, featuring the expected visual updates, newer tech, more features, mechanical improvements and in some markets, a 4-cylinder turbo petrol engine became an option, however, Australia missed out on that power plant.

Then in 2022 the Cherokee was revised again, with the changes centring mainly around tech and feature updates with a few minor aesthetic enhancements.

This is the 5th generation KL Cherokee landed here in Australia back in 2014 and production finished at the Illinois plant during 2023.

Engine wise, most Cherokees on the market will feature a 3.2-litre petrol 6-cylinder powering all four wheels, however there are a range of front-wheel drive 2.4-litre petrol 4-cylinders available while an all-wheel drive 2.0-litre turbo diesel made an appearance in 2014 although it was discontinued a year later.

Regardless of the engine fitted, all Cherokees are mated to a 9-speed automatic.

Depending on the model year, there is a choice of no less than nine variants to select from, offering everything from the bare basics in the front-wheel drive Sport through to all of the bells and whistles in the S-Limited and if heading into the wilderness is your cup of tea, check out the off-roading focussed Trailhawk.

Even though the Cherokee is predominantly front-wheel drive until clever computers detect that the front wheels have lost traction, depending on the trim spec, it will feature either Jeep’s Active Drive I or 2 system, Active Drive 1 features a single speed power transfer unit, Active Drive 2 features, you guessed it, two speeds, plus a lock mode.

However, the Trailhawk features a locking rear diff, or as Jeep calls it ‘Active Drive Lock’ as well as a host of other off-road specific features.

Also and unlike the vast majority of SUV’s in this size category, all all-wheel drive Cherokee’s feature systems including Jeep’s ‘Selec-Terrain’ traction control system, which won’t just dominate shopping centre car parks and the kids school run, they allow the Cherokee to genuinely explore the wilderness.

Plus, the Cherokee received a mid cycle update in 2018, featuring the expected visual updates, newer tech, more features, mechanical improvements and in some markets, a 4-cylinder turbo petrol engine became an option, however, Australia missed out on that power plant.

Then in 2022 the Cherokee was revised again, with the changes centring mainly around tech and feature updates with a few minor aesthetic enhancements.

Exterior:

There are reports of sunroofs rattling, this was included in a Jeep service bulletin so make sure it has been seen to.

There are many of complaints regarding the headlights being too dim especially on early models.

There are reports that anything that has electricity running to it can play up. Door lock actuators, power windows, the lights, however we wouldn’t regard these as common problems but there are complaints out there.

Interior:

The most common complaints surround the U-Connect infotainment systems playing up, either freezing briefly, or restarting by itself randomly. Some of these issues have been solved with the software updates that Jeep has provided, other haven’t.

The rear seats are known to get a bit rattly, this was also mentioned in a Jeep service bulletin.

A “service parking brake” warning is also a commonly seen fault and the problem is, apparently you need to replace the wiring harness to the E-brake module to resolve this issue.

Mechanically:

At best the Cherokee really only achieves an average reliability rating. This isn’t because they are all averagely reliable, it’s more because the really good ones that suffer no problems are often dragged down by the really bad ones that have all of the problems. Hence the Cherokee’s common love or hate reputation.

The 2.0 Diesel EBT Multijet (2014-15) in a host of Alfas, Fiats as well as other Jeeps and it can suffer from all the usual EGR, DPF, Injector and turbo problems that all modern diesels are guilty of.

Unlike the petrol engines, the diesels have a timing belt which is due every 100,000km. It is critical this timing belt change is done as we have encountered many circumstances where a missed timing belt change has resulted in catastrophic engine failure.

The 2.4-litre ED6 Multiair 4-cylinder by Fiat can suffer from extreme oil consumption that has commonly led to many of these engine’s demise. It is critical to make sure you change the oil on time and check it every few thousand kilometres.

Also, although they feature a timing chain and not a belt, they occasionally have timing chain issues.

The ever popular 3.2 EHB petrol V6, like the 4-cylinder, can suffer from oil leaks, this time from cooler and filter housing. Repairing this is a big job that involves removal of the manifold and a host of other components.

These engines can also suffer from rocker arm failure which will result in a large and unfortunate repair bill.

The ZF 9-speed automatic transmission offers overall ok reliability however the early models were plagued with operational issues mostly related to software more than mechanical failures.

They can suffer from vibrations from driveshafts and early models have been

Exterior:

There are reports of sunroofs rattling, this was included in a Jeep service bulletin so make sure it has been seen to.

There are many of complaints regarding the headlights being too dim especially on early models.

There are reports that anything that has electricity running to it can play up. Door lock actuators, power windows, the lights, however we wouldn’t regard these as common problems but there are complaints out there.

Interior:

The most common complaints surround the U-Connect infotainment systems playing up, either freezing briefly, or restarting by itself randomly. Some of these issues have been solved with the software updates that Jeep has provided, other haven’t.

The rear seats are known to get a bit rattly, this was also mentioned in a Jeep service bulletin.

A “service parking brake” warning is also a commonly seen fault and the problem is, apparently you need to replace the wiring harness to the E-brake module to resolve this issue.

Mechanically:

At best the Cherokee really only achieves an average reliability rating. This isn’t because they are all averagely reliable, it’s more because the really good ones that suffer no problems are often dragged down by the really bad ones that have all of the problems. Hence the Cherokee’s common love or hate reputation.

The 2.0 Diesel EBT Multijet (2014-15) in a host of Alfas, Fiats as well as other Jeeps and it can suffer from all the usual EGR, DPF, Injector and turbo problems that all modern diesels are guilty of.

Unlike the petrol engines, the diesels have a timing belt which is due every 100,000km. It is critical this timing belt change is done as we have encountered many circumstances where a missed timing belt change has resulted in catastrophic engine failure.

The 2.4-litre ED6 Multiair 4-cylinder by Fiat can suffer from extreme oil consumption that has commonly led to many of these engine’s demise. It is critical to make sure you change the oil on time and check it every few thousand kilometres.

Also, although they feature a timing chain and not a belt, they occasionally have timing chain issues.

The ever popular 3.2 EHB petrol V6, like the 4-cylinder, can suffer from oil leaks, this time from cooler and filter housing. Repairing this is a big job that involves removal of the manifold and a host of other components.

These engines can also suffer from rocker arm failure which will result in a large and unfortunate repair bill.

The ZF 9-speed automatic transmission offers overall ok reliability however the early models were plagued with operational issues mostly related to software more than mechanical failures.

They can suffer from vibrations from driveshafts and early models have been guilty of transmission shifting issues and software gremlins.

The PTU (transfer case) is a weak point in the driveline with plenty of mechanical failures and most of them happening off-road when its doing exactly what it was apparently designed to do. Although, operator technique is also a factor here.

It’s important to be aware that the Cherokee has received a far higher than average number of recalls however, manufacturers recalls aren’t necessarily a bad thing.

It’s the manufacturer looking out for you, it potentially improves your car and, in some cases, reduces the number of law suits against manufacturers. So… win – win right?

Recalls:

  • In 2014, a recall was issued for Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles with Adaptive Cruise Control due to an unintended acceleration issue that could cause the vehicle to accelerate to high speeds and make it difficult to stop or slow down, posing an accident hazard.
  • In 2014, Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles manufactured between May 21 and June 6 with Hitachi rear shock absorbers were recalled due to the risk of the shock absorbers breaking and causing damage to other rear chassis or suspension components, posing a potential hazard to drivers and other road users.
  • In 2015, Jeep issued a recall for KL Cherokee vehicles due to potential inadvertent deployment of side curtain and seat airbags when driving off-road, which could pose a distraction and visibility hazard to the driver.
  • In 2015, a recall was issued for Jeep KL Cherokee models due to a misrouted air conditioning hose that could potentially cause leaks and lead to smoke or fire in the engine compartment.
  • In August 2015, a recall was issued for 2014-2015 Jeep KL Cherokee Longitude, Limited, and Trailhawk models due to a corrosion-induced short circuit and water intrusion in the power liftgate control module, potentially causing inoperability or a fire.
  • In 2015-16, Jeep KL Cherokee cars were affected by a recall due to corrosion of liftgate control module two, which may cause a short circuit, water intrusion, and lead to inoperative liftgate or fire, resulting in the recall.
  • In 2014-15, Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles were at risk of losing power due to insufficient wire terminal crimps in the transaxle wiring harness, leading to a recall in September 2016 which also highlighted potential dangers posed to the driver and other road users and the possibility of the on-board diagnostic system logging a Diagnostic Trouble Code.
  • 2013-2016 Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles equipped with ‘Off Road Group’ were recalled in September 2016 due to non-compliant flare protection spats, which increased the risk of debris coming into contact with bystanders and posed an injury hazard.
  • In 2018, a recall campaign was issued for the 2018 Jeep KL Cherokee due to a potential powertrain control module failure, which could cause the engine to stall while driving, posing a collision risk.
  • In 2018, a recall campaign was issued for 2019 model year Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles sold in Australia due to the potential formation of gas pockets in the brake system caused by the chrome coating on the rear brake calipers, which could lead to reduced rear brake performance, increased stopping distances, and other related issues.
  • Between 2014 and 2018, Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles in Australia were recalled due to a potential issue with the transmission shifting to neutral, resulting in a loss of power and posing a safety risk to occupants and other road users.
  • In 2018-19, certain Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles sold in Australia may experience a loss of communication between the acceleration sensor and the occupant restraint controller, potentially leading to airbag malfunction and increased risk of injury, prompting recall campaign V63 in August 2019.
  • Between June 2013 and June 2018, Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles in Australia were recalled due to a potential failure of the Power Transfer Unit’s differential gear splines, which could result in power loss while driving and the loss of the ‘PARK’ function while stationary, potentially increasing the risk of a collision and causing injury.
  • 2014-16 Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles were recalled in October 2016 due to a safety hazard caused by the seat fastener not being tightened, which could increase the risk of injury to seat occupants in a collision.
  • Between 2014 and 2018, a recall was issued for Jeep KL Cherokee Trailhawk vehicles due to the non-compliance of the Vehicle Recovery Strap with safety regulations, resulting in potential unsafe usage, and the strap was to be repaired or replaced for free.
  • In 2018, a recall was issued for 2018 Jeep KL Cherokee 2.4L vehicles with ED6 or ED8 engines due to an incorrectly manufactured fuel tube which could cause a fuel leak and potentially an engine compartment fire, as well as a loss of power and potential collision risk.
  • Between 2014 and 2018, some Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles had faulty software for the Power Control Module (PCM) that caused cruise control to malfunction and potentially lock the speed or accelerate, leading to a recall (campaign number U63) in June 2018. The issue could result in collisions if the driver didn’t apply the brakes or shift to neutral, and the fix was a dealership inspection and reprogramming of the PCM and transmission software.
  • In 2018, a recall campaign was issued for the 2018 Jeep KL Cherokee AWD due to a faulty right front halfshaft assembly, which could result in loss of power, inability to stay in ‘park’ gear, and potential collision if a broken halfshaft bearing cage caused a loss of motive power while in traffic.
  • 2021 Jeep KL Cherokee was affected by a recall campaign due to the risk of leaking transmission fluid caused by an incorrectly cured rubber in the transmission oil cooler hose, which could lead to a potential vehicle fire

Exterior:

There are reports of sunroofs rattling, this was included in a Jeep service bulletin so make sure it has been seen to.

There are many of complaints regarding the headlights being too dim especially on early models.

There are reports that anything that has electricity running to it can play up. Door lock actuators, power windows, the lights, however we wouldn’t regard these as common problems but there are complaints out there.

Interior:

The most common complaints surround the U-Connect infotainment systems playing up, either freezing briefly, or restarting by itself randomly. Some of these issues have been solved with the software updates that Jeep has provided, other haven’t.

The rear seats are known to get a bit rattly, this was also mentioned in a Jeep service bulletin.

A “service parking brake” warning is also a commonly seen fault and the problem is, apparently you need to replace the wiring harness to the E-brake module to resolve this issue.

Mechanically:

At best the Cherokee really only achieves an average reliability rating. This isn’t because they are all averagely reliable, it’s more because the really good ones that suffer no problems are often dragged down by the really bad ones that have all of the problems. Hence the Cherokee’s common love or hate reputation.

The 2.0 Diesel EBT Multijet (2014-15) in a host of Alfas, Fiats as well as other Jeeps and it can suffer from all the usual EGR, DPF, Injector and turbo problems that all modern diesels are guilty of.

Unlike the petrol engines, the diesels have a timing belt which is due every 100,000km. It is critical this timing belt change is done as we have encountered many circumstances where a missed timing belt change has resulted in catastrophic engine failure.

The 2.4-litre ED6 Multiair 4-cylinder by Fiat can suffer from extreme oil consumption that has commonly led to many of these engine’s demise. It is critical to make sure you change the oil on time and check it every few thousand kilometres.

Also, although they feature a timing chain and not a belt, they occasionally have timing chain issues.

The ever popular 3.2 EHB petrol V6, like the 4-cylinder, can suffer from oil leaks, this time from cooler and filter housing. Repairing this is a big job that involves removal of the manifold and a host of other components.

These engines can also suffer from rocker arm failure which will result in a large and unfortunate repair bill.

The ZF 9-speed automatic transmission offers overall ok reliability however the early models were plagued with operational issues mostly related to software more than mechanical failures.

They can suffer from vibrations from driveshafts and early models have been guilty of transmission shifting issues and software gremlins.

The PTU (transfer case) is a weak point in the driveline with plenty of mechanical failures and most of them happening off-road when its doing exactly what it was apparently designed to do. Although, operator technique is also a factor here.

It’s important to be aware that the Cherokee has received a far higher than average number of recalls however, manufacturers recalls aren’t necessarily a bad thing.

It’s the manufacturer looking out for you, it potentially improves your car and, in some cases, reduces the number of law suits against manufacturers. So… win – win right?

Recalls:

  • In 2014, a recall was issued for Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles with Adaptive Cruise Control due to an unintended acceleration issue that could cause the vehicle to accelerate to high speeds and make it difficult to stop or slow down, posing an accident hazard.
  • In 2014, Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles manufactured between May 21 and June 6 with Hitachi rear shock absorbers were recalled due to the risk of the shock absorbers breaking and causing damage to other rear chassis or suspension components, posing a potential hazard to drivers and other road users.
  • In 2015, Jeep issued a recall for KL Cherokee vehicles due to potential inadvertent deployment of side curtain and seat airbags when driving off-road, which could pose a distraction and visibility hazard to the driver.
  • In 2015, a recall was issued for Jeep KL Cherokee models due to a misrouted air conditioning hose that could potentially cause leaks and lead to smoke or fire in the engine compartment.
  • In August 2015, a recall was issued for 2014-2015 Jeep KL Cherokee Longitude, Limited, and Trailhawk models due to a corrosion-induced short circuit and water intrusion in the power liftgate control module, potentially causing inoperability or a fire.
  • In 2015-16, Jeep KL Cherokee cars were affected by a recall due to corrosion of liftgate control module two, which may cause a short circuit, water intrusion, and lead to inoperative liftgate or fire, resulting in the recall.
  • In 2014-15, Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles were at risk of losing power due to insufficient wire terminal crimps in the transaxle wiring harness, leading to a recall in September 2016 which also highlighted potential dangers posed to the driver and other road users and the possibility of the on-board diagnostic system logging a Diagnostic Trouble Code.
  • 2013-2016 Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles equipped with ‘Off Road Group’ were recalled in September 2016 due to non-compliant flare protection spats, which increased the risk of debris coming into contact with bystanders and posed an injury hazard.
  • In 2018, a recall campaign was issued for the 2018 Jeep KL Cherokee due to a potential powertrain control module failure, which could cause the engine to stall while driving, posing a collision risk.
  • In 2018, a recall campaign was issued for 2019 model year Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles sold in Australia due to the potential formation of gas pockets in the brake system caused by the chrome coating on the rear brake calipers, which could lead to reduced rear brake performance, increased stopping distances, and other related issues.
  • Between 2014 and 2018, Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles in Australia were recalled due to a potential issue with the transmission shifting to neutral, resulting in a loss of power and posing a safety risk to occupants and other road users.
  • In 2018-19, certain Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles sold in Australia may experience a loss of communication between the acceleration sensor and the occupant restraint controller, potentially leading to airbag malfunction and increased risk of injury, prompting recall campaign V63 in August 2019.
  • Between June 2013 and June 2018, Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles in Australia were recalled due to a potential failure of the Power Transfer Unit’s differential gear splines, which could result in power loss while driving and the loss of the ‘PARK’ function while stationary, potentially increasing the risk of a collision and causing injury.
  • 2014-16 Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles were recalled in October 2016 due to a safety hazard caused by the seat fastener not being tightened, which could increase the risk of injury to seat occupants in a collision.
  • Between 2014 and 2018, a recall was issued for Jeep KL Cherokee Trailhawk vehicles due to the non-compliance of the Vehicle Recovery Strap with safety regulations, resulting in potential unsafe usage, and the strap was to be repaired or replaced for free.
  • In 2018, a recall was issued for 2018 Jeep KL Cherokee 2.4L vehicles with ED6 or ED8 engines due to an incorrectly manufactured fuel tube which could cause a fuel leak and potentially an engine compartment fire, as well as a loss of power and potential collision risk.
  • Between 2014 and 2018, some Jeep KL Cherokee vehicles had faulty software for the Power Control Module (PCM) that caused cruise control to malfunction and potentially lock the speed or accelerate, leading to a recall (campaign number U63) in June 2018. The issue could result in collisions if the driver didn’t apply the brakes or shift to neutral, and the fix was a dealership inspection and reprogramming of the PCM and transmission software.
  • In 2018, a recall campaign was issued for the 2018 Jeep KL Cherokee AWD due to a faulty right front halfshaft assembly, which could result in loss of power, inability to stay in ‘park’ gear, and potential collision if a broken halfshaft bearing cage caused a loss of motive power while in traffic.
  • 2021 Jeep KL Cherokee was affected by a recall campaign due to the risk of leaking transmission fluid caused by an incorrectly cured rubber in the transmission oil cooler hose, which could lead to a potential vehicle fire

Body Styles

5-door wagon

Engines

2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)

Power

130kW – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
200kW – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
125kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)

Torque

229Nm – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
316Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary)
350Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)
315Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)

Transmissions

9-speed Sports Automatic

Fuel Consumption

5.8 – 10.2L / 100km

Length

4623 – 4651mm (5-door wagon)

Width

1859 – 1904mm (5-door wagon)

Height

1631 – 1724mm (5-door wagon)

Wheelbase

2699 – 2720mm (5-door wagon)

Kerb Weight

1834kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

450kg (unbraked), 1800kg (braked) (Sport)
450kg (unbraked), 2200kg (braked) (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary)
450kg (unbraked), 2393kg (braked) (Limited)
750kg (unbraked), 2000kg (braked) (Sport)
750kg (unbraked), 2200kg (braked) (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
750kg (unbraked), 1500kg (braked) (Sport)

ANCAP Ratings

5 stars (Tested 2016)

Body Styles

5-door wagon

Engines

2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)

Power

130kW – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
200kW – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
125kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)

Torque

229Nm – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
316Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary)
350Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)
315Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)

Transmissions

9-speed Sports Automatic

Fuel Consumption

5.8 – 10.2L / 100km

Length

4623 – 4651mm (5-door wagon)

Width

1859 – 1904mm (5-door wagon)

Height

1631 – 1724mm (5-door wagon)

Wheelbase

2699 – 2720mm (5-door wagon)

Kerb Weight

1834kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

450kg (unbraked), 1800kg (braked) (Sport)
450kg (unbraked), 2200kg (braked) (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary)
450kg (unbraked), 2393kg (braked) (Limited)
750kg (unbraked), 2000kg (braked) (Sport)
750kg (unbraked), 2200kg (braked) (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
750kg (unbraked), 1500kg (braked) (Sport)

ANCAP Ratings

5 stars (Tested 2016)

Body Styles

5-door wagon

Engines

2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)

Power

130kW – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
200kW – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
125kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)

Torque

229Nm – 2.4 litre 4-cylinder engine (Sport)
316Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary)
350Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder engine (Limited)
315Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder engine (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)

Transmissions

9-speed Sports Automatic

Fuel Consumption

5.8 – 10.2L / 100km

Length

4623 – 4651mm (5-door wagon)

Width

1859 – 1904mm (5-door wagon)

Height

1631 – 1724mm (5-door wagon)

Wheelbase

2699 – 2720mm (5-door wagon)

Kerb Weight

1834kg (5 door Wagon)

Towing

450kg (unbraked), 1800kg (braked) (Sport)
450kg (unbraked), 2200kg (braked) (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Blackhawk, 75th Anniversary)
450kg (unbraked), 2393kg (braked) (Limited)
750kg (unbraked), 2000kg (braked) (Sport)
750kg (unbraked), 2200kg (braked) (Longitude, Limited, Trailhawk, Night Eagle, S-Limited, 80th Anniversary)
750kg (unbraked), 1500kg (braked) (Sport)

ANCAP Ratings

5 stars (Tested 2016)

Warranty

3 years / 100,000 km (2014 Sport, 2014 Longitude, 2014 Limited, 2014 Trailhawk, 2014 Blackhawk, 2014 75th Anniversary)
5 years / 100,000 km (2014 Sport, 2014 Longitude, 2014 Limited, 2014 Trailhawk, 2014 Night Eagle, 2014 S-Limited, 2014 80th Anniversary)

Service Intervals

12,000 km / 6 months (2014 Sport, 2014 Longitude, 2014 Limited, 2014 Trailhawk, 2014 Blackhawk, 2014 75th Anniversary)
10,000 km / 6 months (2014 Limited)
12,000 km / 12 months (2014 Sport, 2014 Longitude, 2014 Limited, 2014 Trailhawk, 2014 Night Eagle, 2014 S-Limited, 2014 80th Anniversary)

Model range, pricing & features

Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk-1

Sport

Price when new: $33,500 - $38,250

Price used: $9,800 - $33,300

Standard Features:

17-inch alloy wheels
Full-size spare wheel
Body coloured bumper bars
Body coloured side mirrors
Body coloured door handles
5-star ANCAP safety rating (tested 2016)
Driver and front passenger airbags
Front side airbags
Full-length curtain airbags
Driver’s knee airbag
3-point (lap sash) seatbelt for all occupants
Height adjustable seatbelts for driver and front passenger
Seat pretensioners for for driver and front passenger
Child seat anchor points
Seatbelt reminder for driver and front passenger’s seat
Headrests for all occupants
Active head restraints for driver and front passenger
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD)
Electronic stability program (ESP)
Traction control
Rollover stability control
Trailer sway control
Hill hold control
Speed limiter
Reversing camera – in infotainment system
Rear vision mirror
Electric side mirrors
Heated side mirrors
Electric windows – front and rear with driver’s and front passenger’s auto up/down function
Cruise control
Projector headlights
Rear Fog Lights
Coming/leaving home function
Daytime running lights (DRL)
Intermittent wipers with speed settings
Rear wiper
Remote central locking with keyless entry (via button on door handle)
Engine immobiliser
Tachometer
Fuel gauge
Monochrome driver’s display
Electromechnical handbrake
Power steering
Manual air conditioning
Rear air vents
Cloth upholstery
Manually adjustable driver’s and front passenger’s seat
6-speaker sound system
AM/FM radio
Bluetooth connectivity – phone and audio streaming
Android Auto – wireless
AUX (3.5mm) input
USB connectivity
SD card inputs
Front USB inputs
12V power outlets – front, rear and boot
Front cup holders – 2x
Rear cup holders – 2x
Centre console storage
Glovebox
Front seat map pockets
Sunglasses holder
Vanity mirror for driver and front passenger
60:40 rear folding seats
Floor mats

2018 update:

Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Forward collision warning
Blind-spot monitoring
Rear-cross traffic alert
LED headlights
LED tail lights
7.0-inch Uconnect infotainment system
Apple CarPlay
Android Auto”

Longitude

Price when new: $39,000 - $41,950

Price used: $17,400 - $34,000

In addition to Sport:

Remote start system
Electrochromatic rear vision mirror
Front fog lights
Interior ambient lighting
Rain sensing (auto) wipers
Multi-functional leather sterring wheel
Leather gear knob
Dual-zone climate control
8-Way electrically adjustable driver’s seat
Electric lumbar support adjustment for driver
Electric tailgate

2018 update:

Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Forward collision warning
Blind-spot monitoring
Rear-cross traffic alert
Paddle shifters
LED headlights
LED tail lights
7.0-inch Uconnect infotainment system
Apple CarPlay
Android Auto

Limited

Price when new: $44,000 - $50,750

Price used: $13,600 - $43,900

In addition to Longitude:

18-inch alloy wheels
Bi-xenon HID headlights
Automatic headlight levelling system
Headlight washers
Front and rear parking sensors
Premium interior trim
Leather upholstery
Heated front seats
Uconnect infotainment system
7.0-inch colour driver’s display
8.4-inch touchscreen infotainment system (Uconnect)
9-speaker Alpine sound system

2018 update:

Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Forward collision warning
Blind-spot monitoring
Rear-cross traffic alert
LED headlights
LED tail lights
Automatic high-beam
Alarm
Ventilated front seats
Satellite navigation

Trailhawk

Price when new: $47,500 - $53,450

Price used: $14,800 - $46,400

In addition to Longitude:

All season tyres
Front suspension skid plate
Fuel tank skid plate shield
Transmission skid plate
Underbody skid plate
Off road wheel flares
Hill decent control
Jeep Active Drive Lock
Locker rear axle
Off road group
Off road suspension
Selec-speed control
Accent colour exterior badging, exterior mirrors, grille surrounds and roof rails
Black hood decal
Bi-xenon HID headlights
Automatic headlight levelling system
Headlight washers
Front and rear parking sensors
Leather upholstery
Heated front seats
7.0-inch colour driver’s display
8.4-inch touchscreen infotainment system
9-speaker Alpine sound system
All season floor mats
Red tow hooks

2018 update:

Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Forward collision warning
Blind-spot monitoring
Rear-cross traffic alert
LED headlights
LED tail lights
Satellite navigation

Blackhawk

Price when new: $44,000

Price used: $15,400 - $22,200

In addition to Longitude:

Black styling pack
18-inch gloss black wheels
8.4-inch Uconnect infotainment system
DAB+ digital radio

75th Anniversary

Price when new: $45,000

Price used: $16,000 - $22,600

In addition to Longitude:

18-inch gloss black wheels
75th Anniversary badging
9-speaker Alpine sound system
8.4-inch Uconnect infotainment system
DAB+ digital radio

Night Eagle

Price when new: $43,450 - $45,150

Price used: $20,900 - $36,600

In addition to Longitude:

18-inch alloy wheels
Black styling pack
Gloss black interior trim
Adaptive cruise control
Side distance warning
Autonomous parking
8.4-inch Uconnect infotainment system
Apple CarPlay
Android Auto

S-Limited

Price when new: $52,650 - $56,950

Price used: $32,700 - $51,000

In addition to Longitude:

19-inch alloy wheels
Granite Crystal badging, grille surrounds and roof rails
Panoramic sunroof
Tungsten accent stitching for seats, door armrests and centre console lid

80th Anniversary

Price when new: $51,941

Price used: $36,500 - $46,800

In addition to Limited:

18-inch alloy wheels with Granite Crystal finish
Granite Crystal finishes and exterior accents
80th Anniversary commemorative badging
Premium leather upholstered seats
80th Anniversary seat tags
Berber floor mats with 80th Anniversary tags
Dual-pane panoramic sunroof

So should you buy one? For the majority, absolutely not, you shouldn’t buy a Cherokee, but for a select few, yes, you should.

The Cherokee is simply the most capable SUV of this size category, especially in Trailhawk spec, and if you genuinely require more than impressive off-roading chops while retaining all of the features, tech, safety, practicality and comfortable accommodation of a medium sized SUV for the day to day duties, and you’re happy to sign up to the positives and the unfortunately copious amounts of negatives that inhabit the ‘Jeeposhere’, yes buy one.

However, even then, you must check and double check that any Cherokee you’re looking at ticks every service, maintenance and recall box, and have it thoroughly inspected for a pre-purchase inspection.

But, and be honest with yourself here, are you really ever going to go properly off-roading? If you answer no, in that case, no, do not buy one of these.

We understand the appeal, the Cherokee looks great, it does all the SUV stuff you need it to, on the used market they seem like great value and Jeep has that whole cool rugged image thing going on, but the long long list of common faults and associated costs to repair these issues is for us, far too risky.

Plus there are loads of other SUVs that do the normal SUV thing just as well as the Cherokee, that have a far better reputation for reliability and if you buy an all-wheel drive variant,

So should you buy one? For the majority, absolutely not, you shouldn’t buy a Cherokee, but for a select few, yes, you should.

The Cherokee is simply the most capable SUV of this size category, especially in Trailhawk spec, and if you genuinely require more than impressive off-roading chops while retaining all of the features, tech, safety, practicality and comfortable accommodation of a medium sized SUV for the day to day duties, and you’re happy to sign up to the positives and the unfortunately copious amounts of negatives that inhabit the ‘Jeeposhere’, yes buy one.

However, even then, you must check and double check that any Cherokee you’re looking at ticks every service, maintenance and recall box, and have it thoroughly inspected for a pre-purchase inspection.

But, and be honest with yourself here, are you really ever going to go properly off-roading? If you answer no, in that case, no, do not buy one of these.

We understand the appeal, the Cherokee looks great, it does all the SUV stuff you need it to, on the used market they seem like great value and Jeep has that whole cool rugged image thing going on, but the long long list of common faults and associated costs to repair these issues is for us, far too risky.

Plus there are loads of other SUVs that do the normal SUV thing just as well as the Cherokee, that have a far better reputation for reliability and if you buy an all-wheel drive variant, will handle some light off-roading easily.

We’re talking about the Toyota RAV4, the Mazda CX-5 and the Honda CR-V, none of which will touch a Cherokee for serious off-roading but for the vast majority of adventuring most SUV owners will ever attempt, the all-wheel drive variants of these options will do just fine, and they’re better than a Cherokee in almost every other way, sorry.

So should you buy one? For the majority, absolutely not, you shouldn’t buy a Cherokee, but for a select few, yes, you should.

The Cherokee is simply the most capable SUV of this size category, especially in Trailhawk spec, and if you genuinely require more than impressive off-roading chops while retaining all of the features, tech, safety, practicality and comfortable accommodation of a medium sized SUV for the day to day duties, and you’re happy to sign up to the positives and the unfortunately copious amounts of negatives that inhabit the ‘Jeeposhere’, yes buy one.

However, even then, you must check and double check that any Cherokee you’re looking at ticks every service, maintenance and recall box, and have it thoroughly inspected for a pre-purchase inspection.

But, and be honest with yourself here, are you really ever going to go properly off-roading? If you answer no, in that case, no, do not buy one of these.

We understand the appeal, the Cherokee looks great, it does all the SUV stuff you need it to, on the used market they seem like great value and Jeep has that whole cool rugged image thing going on, but the long long list of common faults and associated costs to repair these issues is for us, far too risky.

Plus there are loads of other SUVs that do the normal SUV thing just as well as the Cherokee, that have a far better reputation for reliability and if you buy an all-wheel drive variant, will handle some light off-roading easily.

We’re talking about the Toyota RAV4, the Mazda CX-5 and the Honda CR-V, none of which will touch a Cherokee for serious off-roading but for the vast majority of adventuring most SUV owners will ever attempt, the all-wheel drive variants of these options will do just fine, and they’re better than a Cherokee in almost every other way, sorry.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of May 5, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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