Pros

  • Designed, engineered, and built to handle the toughest conditions.
  • Incredible value for money.
  • Parts and repairs are often inexpensive.
  • Just a no-nonsense work tool.

Cons

  • Parts availability can be a challenge.
  • Build quality is extremely inconsistent.
  • The support network is sporadic at best.
  • Just a no-nonsense work tool.

Verdict

Should you buy one? It’s crucial to bear in mind that these Mahindra Pik-Ups were crafted to navigate a spectrum of Indian conditions—from rainforests and deserts to the Himalayas—while enduring some of the world’s most challenging traffic scenarios. All of this occurs while utilizing less-than-optimal fuel, undergoing varied levels of...

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The Mahindra Pik-Up, or possibly the Scorpio depending on your location, can be likened to the Wish or Aldi version of the 79 Series Toyota LandCruiser. It is robust, durable, and designed to tackle the most challenging conditions.

While the Pik-Up remains a dependable workhorse, the 79 Series, to many, has evolved into more of a fashion statement. Similar to the 79 Series and other iconic off-roaders, the Pik-Up is constructed on a ladder frame chassis, featuring independent coil-springs at the front and a rigid rear axle with leaf springs at the rear.

The Pik-Up first arrived from India to Australian shores in 2007, but our focus here is on the post-2016 models. These later models are more prevalent in the used car market and have undergone substantial updates compared to the previous generation.

Speaking of updates, it appears that tweaks have been made not only on a yearly basis but possibly with each shipment as well.

Depending on the year model, this generation is available as a 2-door cab chassis, 4-door cab chassis, and 4-door ute/pick-up, generally with 4-wheel drive. There are also a few rear-wheel variants in existence. Regarding variants, technically there are three, but depending on the year, there have been plus models, special editions, dealer-specific versions, and various accessories found on the used market. You’ll find more details below.

In terms of engines, all Australian-delivered Pik-Ups from this generation feature a 2.2-litre Turbo Diesel. Some models have seen updates to this engine, and until recently, it

The Mahindra Pik-Up, or possibly the Scorpio depending on your location, can be likened to the Wish or Aldi version of the 79 Series Toyota LandCruiser. It is robust, durable, and designed to tackle the most challenging conditions.

While the Pik-Up remains a dependable workhorse, the 79 Series, to many, has evolved into more of a fashion statement. Similar to the 79 Series and other iconic off-roaders, the Pik-Up is constructed on a ladder frame chassis, featuring independent coil-springs at the front and a rigid rear axle with leaf springs at the rear.

The Pik-Up first arrived from India to Australian shores in 2007, but our focus here is on the post-2016 models. These later models are more prevalent in the used car market and have undergone substantial updates compared to the previous generation.

Speaking of updates, it appears that tweaks have been made not only on a yearly basis but possibly with each shipment as well.

Depending on the year model, this generation is available as a 2-door cab chassis, 4-door cab chassis, and 4-door ute/pick-up, generally with 4-wheel drive. There are also a few rear-wheel variants in existence. Regarding variants, technically there are three, but depending on the year, there have been plus models, special editions, dealer-specific versions, and various accessories found on the used market. You’ll find more details below.

In terms of engines, all Australian-delivered Pik-Ups from this generation feature a 2.2-litre Turbo Diesel. Some models have seen updates to this engine, and until recently, it was exclusively paired with a 6-speed manual transmission, featuring a low-range transfer case and an Eaton Mechanically Locking Diff. However, as of 2022, a 6-speed automatic transmission has become available on the S11 models.

One of the attractive aspects of these vehicles is the price. In the Australian used market, you can find higher-kilometer early base-spec models for under $20,000. Even the more expensive examples typically ask for under $50,000.

Based on current asking prices, theoretically, you could own a fully kitted out 79 Series LandCruiser or five Mahindra Pik-Ups. However, it’s essential to note that these vehicles are built on a budget, and issues can arise. Read on to discover more about potential challenges associated with the Mahindra Pik-Up.

The Mahindra Pik-Up, or possibly the Scorpio depending on your location, can be likened to the Wish or Aldi version of the 79 Series Toyota LandCruiser. It is robust, durable, and designed to tackle the most challenging conditions.

While the Pik-Up remains a dependable workhorse, the 79 Series, to many, has evolved into more of a fashion statement. Similar to the 79 Series and other iconic off-roaders, the Pik-Up is constructed on a ladder frame chassis, featuring independent coil-springs at the front and a rigid rear axle with leaf springs at the rear.

The Pik-Up first arrived from India to Australian shores in 2007, but our focus here is on the post-2016 models. These later models are more prevalent in the used car market and have undergone substantial updates compared to the previous generation.

Speaking of updates, it appears that tweaks have been made not only on a yearly basis but possibly with each shipment as well.

Depending on the year model, this generation is available as a 2-door cab chassis, 4-door cab chassis, and 4-door ute/pick-up, generally with 4-wheel drive. There are also a few rear-wheel variants in existence. Regarding variants, technically there are three, but depending on the year, there have been plus models, special editions, dealer-specific versions, and various accessories found on the used market. You’ll find more details below.

In terms of engines, all Australian-delivered Pik-Ups from this generation feature a 2.2-litre Turbo Diesel. Some models have seen updates to this engine, and until recently, it was exclusively paired with a 6-speed manual transmission, featuring a low-range transfer case and an Eaton Mechanically Locking Diff. However, as of 2022, a 6-speed automatic transmission has become available on the S11 models.

One of the attractive aspects of these vehicles is the price. In the Australian used market, you can find higher-kilometer early base-spec models for under $20,000. Even the more expensive examples typically ask for under $50,000.

Based on current asking prices, theoretically, you could own a fully kitted out 79 Series LandCruiser or five Mahindra Pik-Ups. However, it’s essential to note that these vehicles are built on a budget, and issues can arise. Read on to discover more about potential challenges associated with the Mahindra Pik-Up.

Exterior:

Some owners have reported significant concerns regarding fit, finish, and overall build quality, while others insist they have encountered no problems at all. With a vehicle in this price range, there is a risk that certain examples may turn out to be subpar, but, as we’ve discovered, any car, regardless of its cost, can face such issues.

The few “common” problems we identified often stemmed from aftermarket accessories, either due to their low quality or improper installation.

Interior:

Similar considerations apply to the interior. If you’re considering a Mahindra Pik-Up with aftermarket additions—ranging from light bars to cruise control—ensure that all these components function properly before making a purchase.

Concerning common issues within the cabin, there have been reports of sluggish cruise control in the S11 model, which occasionally turns off at its own discretion. Some units may exhibit speedometers reading excessively high, a matter generally rectified under warranty.

The infotainment systems have been a source of frustration for many owners. Complaints range from malfunctioning reverse cameras and CarPlay failures to general phone connectivity issues. Additionally, peculiar occurrences such as Bluetooth operating only in mono instead of stereo and inaccurate fuel usage information have been noted.

Apart from these electronic concerns, the seats in certain Pik-Up models have required base repairs. However, it’s worth noting that these instances occurred over extensive usage—over 500,000 kilometers with numerous drivers constantly getting in and out. Under normal circumstances, the seats should endure regular use without issues.

Mechanically:

Regrettably, the Mahindra Pik-Up exhibits a rather inconsistent performance in terms of its mechanical reliability. While some owners sail through their ownership experience without encountering any issues, others find themselves dealing with a host of problems. Fortunately, instances of catastrophic engine failures, a concern prevalent in some of the Pik-Ups pricier competitors (particularly the Ford Ranger), are relatively rare.

However, there are several bothersome but less severe issues that owners may contend with. Turbo failure is one such concern, reminiscent of a common issue observed in Mitsubishi Tritons.

Moving on, EGR problems are not uncommon, and the typical challenges associated with modern common rail diesel engines, such as DPF complications, can surface. In later models, there is a notable trend of reports concerning AdBlue warnings and level sensor issues.

Owners have reported a spectrum of electrical issues, with some cases even necessitating the replacement of entire engine looms under warranty, and in certain instances, this has occurred more than once.

On the manual transmission front, while generally robust, there have been reports of complete failures under warranty. Common complaints include oil leaks, noisy operation, and notchy selector problems.

Regarding the automatic transmission, it’s too early to make a conclusive judgment on long-term reliability.

A noteworthy

Exterior:

Some owners have reported significant concerns regarding fit, finish, and overall build quality, while others insist they have encountered no problems at all. With a vehicle in this price range, there is a risk that certain examples may turn out to be subpar, but, as we’ve discovered, any car, regardless of its cost, can face such issues.

The few “common” problems we identified often stemmed from aftermarket accessories, either due to their low quality or improper installation.

Interior:

Similar considerations apply to the interior. If you’re considering a Mahindra Pik-Up with aftermarket additions—ranging from light bars to cruise control—ensure that all these components function properly before making a purchase.

Concerning common issues within the cabin, there have been reports of sluggish cruise control in the S11 model, which occasionally turns off at its own discretion. Some units may exhibit speedometers reading excessively high, a matter generally rectified under warranty.

The infotainment systems have been a source of frustration for many owners. Complaints range from malfunctioning reverse cameras and CarPlay failures to general phone connectivity issues. Additionally, peculiar occurrences such as Bluetooth operating only in mono instead of stereo and inaccurate fuel usage information have been noted.

Apart from these electronic concerns, the seats in certain Pik-Up models have required base repairs. However, it’s worth noting that these instances occurred over extensive usage—over 500,000 kilometers with numerous drivers constantly getting in and out. Under normal circumstances, the seats should endure regular use without issues.

Mechanically:

Regrettably, the Mahindra Pik-Up exhibits a rather inconsistent performance in terms of its mechanical reliability. While some owners sail through their ownership experience without encountering any issues, others find themselves dealing with a host of problems. Fortunately, instances of catastrophic engine failures, a concern prevalent in some of the Pik-Ups pricier competitors (particularly the Ford Ranger), are relatively rare.

However, there are several bothersome but less severe issues that owners may contend with. Turbo failure is one such concern, reminiscent of a common issue observed in Mitsubishi Tritons.

Moving on, EGR problems are not uncommon, and the typical challenges associated with modern common rail diesel engines, such as DPF complications, can surface. In later models, there is a notable trend of reports concerning AdBlue warnings and level sensor issues.

Owners have reported a spectrum of electrical issues, with some cases even necessitating the replacement of entire engine looms under warranty, and in certain instances, this has occurred more than once.

On the manual transmission front, while generally robust, there have been reports of complete failures under warranty. Common complaints include oil leaks, noisy operation, and notchy selector problems.

Regarding the automatic transmission, it’s too early to make a conclusive judgment on long-term reliability.

A noteworthy concern involves oil leaks from the transfer case breather, leading to oil spewing out. The remedy for this issue often involves installing an extended hose section to address the problem.

Moving further along the drivetrain, concerns arise with premature wear on universal joints and failures in the tail shaft centre bearing. Some instances attribute these problems to tail shaft imbalance issues.

Abnormal rear brake noise and vibration, observed from the outset, have been common. Fortunately, these issues are typically resolved by machining the rear brake drums.

Issues with the front auto-locking hubs have been reported, leading some owners to opt for aftermarket manual hubs as a straightforward solution.

For current Mahindra Pik-Up owners, a crucial recommendation is to have your mechanic (or undertake it yourself if you have the inclination) conduct a thorough spanner check on all front steering and suspension mounting points. In fact, it is advisable to inspect every component bolted to the chassis, as there have been numerous instances of parts working loose, falling off, or breaking. Some of these issues have been attributed to inadequate pre-delivery service checks at the dealership, as alleged by some sources.

Concerning dealerships, while some prove to be remarkably helpful and skilled, others have left owners with terrible experiences. Complaints range from shortages in technical expertise to unreasonable warranty assessments and difficulties in obtaining the necessary parts for addressing warranty issues. Given the low volume of these vehicles and the scattered nature of the dealership network, ownership can become challenging. After all, a budget-friendly ute doesn’t serve its purpose if it spends weeks off the road due to prolonged parts waiting times.

Exterior:

Some owners have reported significant concerns regarding fit, finish, and overall build quality, while others insist they have encountered no problems at all. With a vehicle in this price range, there is a risk that certain examples may turn out to be subpar, but, as we’ve discovered, any car, regardless of its cost, can face such issues.

The few “common” problems we identified often stemmed from aftermarket accessories, either due to their low quality or improper installation.

Interior:

Similar considerations apply to the interior. If you’re considering a Mahindra Pik-Up with aftermarket additions—ranging from light bars to cruise control—ensure that all these components function properly before making a purchase.

Concerning common issues within the cabin, there have been reports of sluggish cruise control in the S11 model, which occasionally turns off at its own discretion. Some units may exhibit speedometers reading excessively high, a matter generally rectified under warranty.

The infotainment systems have been a source of frustration for many owners. Complaints range from malfunctioning reverse cameras and CarPlay failures to general phone connectivity issues. Additionally, peculiar occurrences such as Bluetooth operating only in mono instead of stereo and inaccurate fuel usage information have been noted.

Apart from these electronic concerns, the seats in certain Pik-Up models have required base repairs. However, it’s worth noting that these instances occurred over extensive usage—over 500,000 kilometers with numerous drivers constantly getting in and out. Under normal circumstances, the seats should endure regular use without issues.

Mechanically:

Regrettably, the Mahindra Pik-Up exhibits a rather inconsistent performance in terms of its mechanical reliability. While some owners sail through their ownership experience without encountering any issues, others find themselves dealing with a host of problems. Fortunately, instances of catastrophic engine failures, a concern prevalent in some of the Pik-Ups pricier competitors (particularly the Ford Ranger), are relatively rare.

However, there are several bothersome but less severe issues that owners may contend with. Turbo failure is one such concern, reminiscent of a common issue observed in Mitsubishi Tritons.

Moving on, EGR problems are not uncommon, and the typical challenges associated with modern common rail diesel engines, such as DPF complications, can surface. In later models, there is a notable trend of reports concerning AdBlue warnings and level sensor issues.

Owners have reported a spectrum of electrical issues, with some cases even necessitating the replacement of entire engine looms under warranty, and in certain instances, this has occurred more than once.

On the manual transmission front, while generally robust, there have been reports of complete failures under warranty. Common complaints include oil leaks, noisy operation, and notchy selector problems.

Regarding the automatic transmission, it’s too early to make a conclusive judgment on long-term reliability.

A noteworthy concern involves oil leaks from the transfer case breather, leading to oil spewing out. The remedy for this issue often involves installing an extended hose section to address the problem.

Moving further along the drivetrain, concerns arise with premature wear on universal joints and failures in the tail shaft centre bearing. Some instances attribute these problems to tail shaft imbalance issues.

Abnormal rear brake noise and vibration, observed from the outset, have been common. Fortunately, these issues are typically resolved by machining the rear brake drums.

Issues with the front auto-locking hubs have been reported, leading some owners to opt for aftermarket manual hubs as a straightforward solution.

For current Mahindra Pik-Up owners, a crucial recommendation is to have your mechanic (or undertake it yourself if you have the inclination) conduct a thorough spanner check on all front steering and suspension mounting points. In fact, it is advisable to inspect every component bolted to the chassis, as there have been numerous instances of parts working loose, falling off, or breaking. Some of these issues have been attributed to inadequate pre-delivery service checks at the dealership, as alleged by some sources.

Concerning dealerships, while some prove to be remarkably helpful and skilled, others have left owners with terrible experiences. Complaints range from shortages in technical expertise to unreasonable warranty assessments and difficulties in obtaining the necessary parts for addressing warranty issues. Given the low volume of these vehicles and the scattered nature of the dealership network, ownership can become challenging. After all, a budget-friendly ute doesn’t serve its purpose if it spends weeks off the road due to prolonged parts waiting times.

Body Styles

  • 2 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Utility
  • 2 door Traytop

Engine Specs

  • 2.2 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-diesel, 103kW / 330Nm (S6 2017 – 2019, S10 2017 – 2019, S10 Black mHawk 2018 – 2019)
  • 2.2 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-diesel, 103kW / 320Nm (S6+ 2020 – 2022, S10+ 2020 – 2022, S10+ Black mHawk 2020 – 2022, S11 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (S6, S10, S10 Black mHawk, S6+, S10+, S10+ Black mHawk)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic (S11)

Fuel Consumption

  • 8.6 – 9.3 L / 100kms

Length

  • 5195mm (2 door Cab Chassis, 4 door Cab Chassis, 2 door Traytop)
  • 5175mm (4 door Utility)

Width

  • 1820mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1860mm (2 door Cab Chassis, 2 door Traytop)
  • 1915mm (4 door Cab Chassis, 4 door Utility)

Wheelbase

  • 3040mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1680kg – 1780kg (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 1940kg – 2015kg (4 door Cab Chassis)
  • 2080kg – 2155kg (4 door Utility)
  • 1680kg – 1855kg (2 door Traytop)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2500kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Body Styles

  • 2 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Utility
  • 2 door Traytop

Engine Specs

  • 2.2 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-diesel, 103kW / 330Nm (S6 2017 – 2019, S10 2017 – 2019, S10 Black mHawk 2018 – 2019)
  • 2.2 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-diesel, 103kW / 320Nm (S6+ 2020 – 2022, S10+ 2020 – 2022, S10+ Black mHawk 2020 – 2022, S11 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (S6, S10, S10 Black mHawk, S6+, S10+, S10+ Black mHawk)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic (S11)

Fuel Consumption

  • 8.6 – 9.3 L / 100kms

Length

  • 5195mm (2 door Cab Chassis, 4 door Cab Chassis, 2 door Traytop)
  • 5175mm (4 door Utility)

Width

  • 1820mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1860mm (2 door Cab Chassis, 2 door Traytop)
  • 1915mm (4 door Cab Chassis, 4 door Utility)

Wheelbase

  • 3040mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1680kg – 1780kg (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 1940kg – 2015kg (4 door Cab Chassis)
  • 2080kg – 2155kg (4 door Utility)
  • 1680kg – 1855kg (2 door Traytop)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2500kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Body Styles

  • 2 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Cab Chassis
  • 4 door Utility
  • 2 door Traytop

Engine Specs

  • 2.2 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-diesel, 103kW / 330Nm (S6 2017 – 2019, S10 2017 – 2019, S10 Black mHawk 2018 – 2019)
  • 2.2 litre, 4-cylinder turbo-diesel, 103kW / 320Nm (S6+ 2020 – 2022, S10+ 2020 – 2022, S10+ Black mHawk 2020 – 2022, S11 2022)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (S6, S10, S10 Black mHawk, S6+, S10+, S10+ Black mHawk)
  • 6-speed Sports Automatic (S11)

Fuel Consumption

  • 8.6 – 9.3 L / 100kms

Length

  • 5195mm (2 door Cab Chassis, 4 door Cab Chassis, 2 door Traytop)
  • 5175mm (4 door Utility)

Width

  • 1820mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1860mm (2 door Cab Chassis, 2 door Traytop)
  • 1915mm (4 door Cab Chassis, 4 door Utility)

Wheelbase

  • 3040mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1680kg – 1780kg (2 door Cab Chassis)
  • 1940kg – 2015kg (4 door Cab Chassis)
  • 2080kg – 2155kg (4 door Utility)
  • 1680kg – 1855kg (2 door Traytop)

Towing

  • 750kg (unbraked) – 2500kg (braked) (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Warranty

  • 3 years / 100,000 km (S6, S10, S10 Black mHawk, S6+, S10+, S10+ Black mHawk)
  • 5 years / 150,000 km (S11)

Servicing

  • 15,000 km / 12 months (All Models)

Model range, pricing & features

Mahindra Pik-Up-1

S6

Price when new: $21,990

Price used: $12,800 - $14,700

Equipment

  • 12V Socket(s) – Auxiliary
  • 2 Speaker Stereo
  • ABS (Antilock Brakes)
  • Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt only
  • Air Conditioning
  • Airbag – Driver
  • Airbag – Passenger
  • Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
  • Audio – MP3 Decoder
  • Body Colour – Bumpers
  • Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Partial
  • Bonnet Scoop(s)
  • Brakes – Rear Drum
  • CD Player
  • Control – Electronic Stability
  • Cup Holders – 1st Row
  • Diff lock(s)
  • Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
  • EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
  • Fog Lamps – Front
  • Free Wheeling Hubs – Auto-locking
  • Headlamps – Halogen
  • Headrests – Adjustable 1st Row (Front)
  • Hill Holder
  • Independent Front Suspension
  • Limited Slip Diff
  • Mobile Phone – Holder
  • Mudflaps – front
  • Mudflaps – rear
  • Power Door Mirrors
  • Power Steering
  • Power Windows – Front only
  • Rear View Mirror – Manual Anti-Glare
  • Seatbelt – Load Limiters 1st Row (Front)
  • Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
  • Side Steps
  • Spare Wheel – Full Size Steel
  • Storage Compartment – in Dash
  • Sunglass Holder
  • Suspension – Leaf
  • Tacho
  • Trim – Cloth
  • Trim – Vinyl
  • Trip Computer
  • Wheel Covers – Full

S10

Price when new: $31,990

Price used: $19,500 - $21,800

Adds

  • 16″ Alloy Wheels
  • Air Cond. – Climate Control
  • Armrest – Rear Centre (Shared)
  • Armrests – Front (Driver & Passenger)
  • Bluetooth System
  • Camera – Rear Vision
  • Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
  • Chrome Exterior Highlights
  • Cruise Control
  • Daytime Running Lamps – LED
  • GPS (Satellite Navigation)
  • Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
  • Multi-function Control Screen – Colour
  • Multi-function Steering Wheel
  • Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
  • Seat – Height Adjustable Driver
  • Sports Bar

S10 Black mHawk

Price when new: $38,990

Price used: $26,100 - $28,900

Adds

  • 17″ Alloy Wheels
  • Bull Bar
  • Decals
  • Flares
  • Painted – Wheels

S6+

Price when new: $23,990

Price used: $18,100 - $20,200

Adds

  • Engine Immobiliser
  • Flip/Fold Out Key
  • Headlamps – See me home
  • Intermittent Wipers – Variable
  • Seatbelts – Lap/Sash for 2 seats

S10+

Price when new: $32,500

Price used: $25,100 - $27,700

Adds

  • Chrome Grille Surround
  • Clear Side Indicator Lenses
  • Front Stabiliser
  • Headlamps – Corner (Fixed)
  • Rear Stabiliser

S10+ Black mHawk

Price when new: $39,990

Price used: $31,200 - $34,200

Adds

  • Bedliner

S11

Price when new: $37,990

Price used: $0

Adds

  • Control – Hill Descent

Should you buy one? It’s crucial to bear in mind that these Mahindra Pik-Ups were crafted to navigate a spectrum of Indian conditions—from rainforests and deserts to the Himalayas—while enduring some of the world’s most challenging traffic scenarios. All of this occurs while utilizing less-than-optimal fuel, undergoing varied levels of servicing, and being subjected to a myriad of uses, from daily commuting to multifaceted tasks.

While they may lack certain features and lifestyle allure found in other vehicles within this class, these Mahindras are engineered for durability. If you’re in the market for a straightforward, robust workhorse or adventure vehicle within this price range, the question becomes less about whether you should buy one and more about what else you can acquire.

Comparable options such as Tritons, Navaras, HiLux’s, D-Max, and Colorados, available at the same price, are likely to be significantly older and more extensively used. SsangYong Musso EX or Great Wall Steed, while offering good value, don’t quite match the Mahindra in toughness.

The LDV T60 may boast a range of features, but it lacks the proven track record of the Mahindra, and concerns have been raised, as detailed in our full review. You can find the video and a comprehensive review of one of this car’s most direct competitors, the 70 Series LandCruiser, below.

While the 70 Series LandCruiser might match the Mahindra in toughness and purpose, it offers a broader support network and superior resale value. However, the dilemma lies therein—whether to spend $40,000 on a

Should you buy one? It’s crucial to bear in mind that these Mahindra Pik-Ups were crafted to navigate a spectrum of Indian conditions—from rainforests and deserts to the Himalayas—while enduring some of the world’s most challenging traffic scenarios. All of this occurs while utilizing less-than-optimal fuel, undergoing varied levels of servicing, and being subjected to a myriad of uses, from daily commuting to multifaceted tasks.

While they may lack certain features and lifestyle allure found in other vehicles within this class, these Mahindras are engineered for durability. If you’re in the market for a straightforward, robust workhorse or adventure vehicle within this price range, the question becomes less about whether you should buy one and more about what else you can acquire.

Comparable options such as Tritons, Navaras, HiLux’s, D-Max, and Colorados, available at the same price, are likely to be significantly older and more extensively used. SsangYong Musso EX or Great Wall Steed, while offering good value, don’t quite match the Mahindra in toughness.

The LDV T60 may boast a range of features, but it lacks the proven track record of the Mahindra, and concerns have been raised, as detailed in our full review. You can find the video and a comprehensive review of one of this car’s most direct competitors, the 70 Series LandCruiser, below.

While the 70 Series LandCruiser might match the Mahindra in toughness and purpose, it offers a broader support network and superior resale value. However, the dilemma lies therein—whether to spend $40,000 on a nearly new, low-kilometer S10+ or opt for a decade-old 79 series with well over 300,000kms.

Before staunch LandCruiser enthusiasts highlight concerns about toughness and reliability, it’s worth noting that plenty of Mahindra Pik-Up out there have been used to the extreme, often surpassing 500,000kms with minimal issues.

In conclusion, should you buy one? Absolutely, 100%. It may be very far from perfect and vary in quality, plus it is unconventional in appearance, but the right Mahindra Pik-Up can be undeniably brilliant.

Should you buy one? It’s crucial to bear in mind that these Mahindra Pik-Ups were crafted to navigate a spectrum of Indian conditions—from rainforests and deserts to the Himalayas—while enduring some of the world’s most challenging traffic scenarios. All of this occurs while utilizing less-than-optimal fuel, undergoing varied levels of servicing, and being subjected to a myriad of uses, from daily commuting to multifaceted tasks.

While they may lack certain features and lifestyle allure found in other vehicles within this class, these Mahindras are engineered for durability. If you’re in the market for a straightforward, robust workhorse or adventure vehicle within this price range, the question becomes less about whether you should buy one and more about what else you can acquire.

Comparable options such as Tritons, Navaras, HiLux’s, D-Max, and Colorados, available at the same price, are likely to be significantly older and more extensively used. SsangYong Musso EX or Great Wall Steed, while offering good value, don’t quite match the Mahindra in toughness.

The LDV T60 may boast a range of features, but it lacks the proven track record of the Mahindra, and concerns have been raised, as detailed in our full review. You can find the video and a comprehensive review of one of this car’s most direct competitors, the 70 Series LandCruiser, below.

While the 70 Series LandCruiser might match the Mahindra in toughness and purpose, it offers a broader support network and superior resale value. However, the dilemma lies therein—whether to spend $40,000 on a nearly new, low-kilometer S10+ or opt for a decade-old 79 series with well over 300,000kms.

Before staunch LandCruiser enthusiasts highlight concerns about toughness and reliability, it’s worth noting that plenty of Mahindra Pik-Up out there have been used to the extreme, often surpassing 500,000kms with minimal issues.

In conclusion, should you buy one? Absolutely, 100%. It may be very far from perfect and vary in quality, plus it is unconventional in appearance, but the right Mahindra Pik-Up can be undeniably brilliant.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of Dec 1, 2023.

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