Pros

  • Utterly intoxicating driving experience, in any scenario.
  • Bulletproof reliability.
  • Affordable to buy and maintain.
  • The epitome of the easy-to-live-with performance car.

Cons

  • Not the most practical car out there.
  • You can only impress one passenger at a time.
  • Long commute times as you’ll inherently take the long way home.
  • Physical pain from laughing and smiling constantly.

Verdict

Should you buy one, YES, in fact if you want the perfect fun car, the Mazda ND MX-5 is probably it.

Buying a dedicated sports car rarely involves including logic into the decision making process but the ND MX-5 is simply the logical choice.

It easily provides just as much...

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The Mazda MX-5 or Miata has been around since 1989 and has always been the brands small front engined rear wheel drive 2-seat convertible roadster, continually highly acclaimed and deserving of its hero like status.

The 4th generation 2015 to current model ND series is powered by either a 1.5 or 2.0-litre 4-cylinder engine and fun fact ,the 1.5 is the same engine you’ll find in the Mazda 2 and the 2.0-litre is powering the Mazda 3, CX-3 and CX-5, although they are substantially modified for the MX-5 but the fundamentals are the same.

Power is sent to the rear wheels via either a 6-speed manual or automatic transmission, however, unless you’re buying the auto due to medical reasons, the auto is a very disappointing decision.

The automatic is not bad by any means but buying an MX-5 with an auto is akin to ordering plain toast and a glass of water at a Gordan Ramsey restaurant, fine we guess but you’re robbing yourself of the real experience.

Body style wise, the ND was initially available as a true drop top convertible, however late in 2016, a retractable fastback or RF model was announced, featuring a hardtop and almost Targa aesthetics and functionality.

The RF also adds 40 kilograms (88 pounds) to the kerb weight.

Speaking of weight, bucking the trend of new models growing larger and heavier with each new generation, the ND dropped nearly 100kg (220lb) compared to the previous generation NC and was shorter too.

However, as

The Mazda MX-5 or Miata has been around since 1989 and has always been the brands small front engined rear wheel drive 2-seat convertible roadster, continually highly acclaimed and deserving of its hero like status.

The 4th generation 2015 to current model ND series is powered by either a 1.5 or 2.0-litre 4-cylinder engine and fun fact ,the 1.5 is the same engine you’ll find in the Mazda 2 and the 2.0-litre is powering the Mazda 3, CX-3 and CX-5, although they are substantially modified for the MX-5 but the fundamentals are the same.

Power is sent to the rear wheels via either a 6-speed manual or automatic transmission, however, unless you’re buying the auto due to medical reasons, the auto is a very disappointing decision.

The automatic is not bad by any means but buying an MX-5 with an auto is akin to ordering plain toast and a glass of water at a Gordan Ramsey restaurant, fine we guess but you’re robbing yourself of the real experience.

Body style wise, the ND was initially available as a true drop top convertible, however late in 2016, a retractable fastback or RF model was announced, featuring a hardtop and almost Targa aesthetics and functionality.

The RF also adds 40 kilograms (88 pounds) to the kerb weight.

Speaking of weight, bucking the trend of new models growing larger and heavier with each new generation, the ND dropped nearly 100kg (220lb) compared to the previous generation NC and was shorter too.

However, as good as the early models were, Mazda couldn’t leave the ND alone and have honed and improved it with continual updates.

Firstly in March of 2018 with improvements to the noise, vibration and harshness levels then in September 2018 a more substantial update saw the engine enhanced to deliver more of the good stuff, a few annoyances within the cabin were sorted out and the levels of tech, safety and features increased.

Then for the 2021 year model, there was another subtle update featuring yet more tech, a few new colours and the addition of a flagship trim spec.

Just on the trim specs, globally there have been a huge array, but here in Australia the majority on the used market will be either the standard MX-5 or the higher spec GT but a smattering of special and limited editions were added and removed along the way and all are listed below.

The Mazda MX-5 or Miata has been around since 1989 and has always been the brands small front engined rear wheel drive 2-seat convertible roadster, continually highly acclaimed and deserving of its hero like status.

The 4th generation 2015 to current model ND series is powered by either a 1.5 or 2.0-litre 4-cylinder engine and fun fact ,the 1.5 is the same engine you’ll find in the Mazda 2 and the 2.0-litre is powering the Mazda 3, CX-3 and CX-5, although they are substantially modified for the MX-5 but the fundamentals are the same.

Power is sent to the rear wheels via either a 6-speed manual or automatic transmission, however, unless you’re buying the auto due to medical reasons, the auto is a very disappointing decision.

The automatic is not bad by any means but buying an MX-5 with an auto is akin to ordering plain toast and a glass of water at a Gordan Ramsey restaurant, fine we guess but you’re robbing yourself of the real experience.

Body style wise, the ND was initially available as a true drop top convertible, however late in 2016, a retractable fastback or RF model was announced, featuring a hardtop and almost Targa aesthetics and functionality.

The RF also adds 40 kilograms (88 pounds) to the kerb weight.

Speaking of weight, bucking the trend of new models growing larger and heavier with each new generation, the ND dropped nearly 100kg (220lb) compared to the previous generation NC and was shorter too.

However, as good as the early models were, Mazda couldn’t leave the ND alone and have honed and improved it with continual updates.

Firstly in March of 2018 with improvements to the noise, vibration and harshness levels then in September 2018 a more substantial update saw the engine enhanced to deliver more of the good stuff, a few annoyances within the cabin were sorted out and the levels of tech, safety and features increased.

Then for the 2021 year model, there was another subtle update featuring yet more tech, a few new colours and the addition of a flagship trim spec.

Just on the trim specs, globally there have been a huge array, but here in Australia the majority on the used market will be either the standard MX-5 or the higher spec GT but a smattering of special and limited editions were added and removed along the way and all are listed below.

Exterior:

On early examples, the soft top can wear due to the roof rubbing against the roll over hoops when in the down position.

There are the odd reports of tiny signs of rust on the right hand door quarter window area.

The paint is quite thin thanks to saving weight, (and possibly production costs) but this means it can scratch and chip easily. Be on the look out for any dodgy repairs.

Make sure the drains are regularly cleaned, there are tutorials on YouTube but some owners have complained this is a pain of a job, just make sure it is done.

Check if there is any moisture in the boot, if it’s wet, the roof might be leaking, due to a clogged drainage system.

 

Interior:

Seats wrapped in the leather can lose tension across the leather over time.

The MZD infotainment screen can get a minor spider web crack or a smokey effect, and there have been reports of the infotainment system glitching out however a software update generally fixes it.

The rear view mirrors and the roof liner above the rear window can come loose but it’s not common.

Window switches can play up although this is easily fixed.

The gear levers knob can become worn due to being incredibly enjoyable to use.

Owners of pre-2019 models often despise the cup holders.

 

Mechanically:

Good news for mechanical reliability, much like its predecessors, the ND is very reliable. 

Engine-wise, there is no one big issue that causes expensive failures. 

With age, there might get the occasional water pump leak or coil pack failure however these are very few and far between.

There are some isolated cases of the low-pressure fuel pump failing but absolutely not a common issue.

Although speaking of the low-pressure pump, it’s located in the fuel pump and filter module in the fuel tank and it seems Mazda did not design it to be changed easily. Just about everything behind the seats has got to come out just to access the top of the tank and it’s not an enjoyable task. 

Transmissions are very solid too.

There is the occasional gear selector issue in the manual, but again very far from common. 

It should be noted many owners do attend track days and/or drive them extremely enthusiastically however, we’ve found the majority of these owners also love the car and care and maintain them accordingly to the use they give them.

The MX-5 was designed and engineered from the outset to provide maximum driving enjoyment on and off track and thanks to the low kerb weight and robust mechanicals, with correct maintenance even examples that have been driven very

Exterior:

On early examples, the soft top can wear due to the roof rubbing against the roll over hoops when in the down position.

There are the odd reports of tiny signs of rust on the right hand door quarter window area.

The paint is quite thin thanks to saving weight, (and possibly production costs) but this means it can scratch and chip easily. Be on the look out for any dodgy repairs.

Make sure the drains are regularly cleaned, there are tutorials on YouTube but some owners have complained this is a pain of a job, just make sure it is done.

Check if there is any moisture in the boot, if it’s wet, the roof might be leaking, due to a clogged drainage system.

 

Interior:

Seats wrapped in the leather can lose tension across the leather over time.

The MZD infotainment screen can get a minor spider web crack or a smokey effect, and there have been reports of the infotainment system glitching out however a software update generally fixes it.

The rear view mirrors and the roof liner above the rear window can come loose but it’s not common.

Window switches can play up although this is easily fixed.

The gear levers knob can become worn due to being incredibly enjoyable to use.

Owners of pre-2019 models often despise the cup holders.

 

Mechanically:

Good news for mechanical reliability, much like its predecessors, the ND is very reliable. 

Engine-wise, there is no one big issue that causes expensive failures. 

With age, there might get the occasional water pump leak or coil pack failure however these are very few and far between.

There are some isolated cases of the low-pressure fuel pump failing but absolutely not a common issue.

Although speaking of the low-pressure pump, it’s located in the fuel pump and filter module in the fuel tank and it seems Mazda did not design it to be changed easily. Just about everything behind the seats has got to come out just to access the top of the tank and it’s not an enjoyable task. 

Transmissions are very solid too.

There is the occasional gear selector issue in the manual, but again very far from common. 

It should be noted many owners do attend track days and/or drive them extremely enthusiastically however, we’ve found the majority of these owners also love the car and care and maintain them accordingly to the use they give them.

The MX-5 was designed and engineered from the outset to provide maximum driving enjoyment on and off track and thanks to the low kerb weight and robust mechanicals, with correct maintenance even examples that have been driven very hard are showing excellent reliability.

 

Recalls:

  • February 2019 – Mazda MX-5 (ND) Automatic vehicles manufactured between 2015 and 2019 are affected by a fault in the Transmission Control Module (TCM), potentially causing the automatic transmission to downshift unexpectedly, leading to an abrupt wheel speed reduction and compromising vehicle stability, posing a risk of a loss of vehicle control and potential accidents, with 1,891 units being affected.
  • July 2019 – Mazda MX-5 2015 models, 256 affected units – The metal bracket on the vehicle under cover may separate while driving, posing a hazard as it may fall from the vehicle, increasing the risk of accidents or injuries to vehicle occupants and other road users.
  • December 2021 – Mazda issued a recall for 90,363 vehicles (Mazda2, Mazda3, CX-5, CX-9, Mazda6, MX-5, CX-3) produced from 2017 to 2019 due to a defective low-pressure fuel pump impeller, which could cause the fuel pump to stop working, potentially leading to vehicle stalling and an increased risk of accidents, injuries, or fatalities for occupants and other road users.

Exterior:

On early examples, the soft top can wear due to the roof rubbing against the roll over hoops when in the down position.

There are the odd reports of tiny signs of rust on the right hand door quarter window area.

The paint is quite thin thanks to saving weight, (and possibly production costs) but this means it can scratch and chip easily. Be on the look out for any dodgy repairs.

Make sure the drains are regularly cleaned, there are tutorials on YouTube but some owners have complained this is a pain of a job, just make sure it is done.

Check if there is any moisture in the boot, if it’s wet, the roof might be leaking, due to a clogged drainage system.

 

Interior:

Seats wrapped in the leather can lose tension across the leather over time.

The MZD infotainment screen can get a minor spider web crack or a smokey effect, and there have been reports of the infotainment system glitching out however a software update generally fixes it.

The rear view mirrors and the roof liner above the rear window can come loose but it’s not common.

Window switches can play up although this is easily fixed.

The gear levers knob can become worn due to being incredibly enjoyable to use.

Owners of pre-2019 models often despise the cup holders.

 

Mechanically:

Good news for mechanical reliability, much like its predecessors, the ND is very reliable. 

Engine-wise, there is no one big issue that causes expensive failures. 

With age, there might get the occasional water pump leak or coil pack failure however these are very few and far between.

There are some isolated cases of the low-pressure fuel pump failing but absolutely not a common issue.

Although speaking of the low-pressure pump, it’s located in the fuel pump and filter module in the fuel tank and it seems Mazda did not design it to be changed easily. Just about everything behind the seats has got to come out just to access the top of the tank and it’s not an enjoyable task. 

Transmissions are very solid too.

There is the occasional gear selector issue in the manual, but again very far from common. 

It should be noted many owners do attend track days and/or drive them extremely enthusiastically however, we’ve found the majority of these owners also love the car and care and maintain them accordingly to the use they give them.

The MX-5 was designed and engineered from the outset to provide maximum driving enjoyment on and off track and thanks to the low kerb weight and robust mechanicals, with correct maintenance even examples that have been driven very hard are showing excellent reliability.

 

Recalls:

  • February 2019 – Mazda MX-5 (ND) Automatic vehicles manufactured between 2015 and 2019 are affected by a fault in the Transmission Control Module (TCM), potentially causing the automatic transmission to downshift unexpectedly, leading to an abrupt wheel speed reduction and compromising vehicle stability, posing a risk of a loss of vehicle control and potential accidents, with 1,891 units being affected.
  • July 2019 – Mazda MX-5 2015 models, 256 affected units – The metal bracket on the vehicle under cover may separate while driving, posing a hazard as it may fall from the vehicle, increasing the risk of accidents or injuries to vehicle occupants and other road users.
  • December 2021 – Mazda issued a recall for 90,363 vehicles (Mazda2, Mazda3, CX-5, CX-9, Mazda6, MX-5, CX-3) produced from 2017 to 2019 due to a defective low-pressure fuel pump impeller, which could cause the fuel pump to stop working, potentially leading to vehicle stalling and an increased risk of accidents, injuries, or fatalities for occupants and other road users.

Body Styles

2 door Roadster

2 door Targa

Engines

1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol

Power

96kW – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

118kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT, Limited Edition)

97kW – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5)

135kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (GT, MX-5, 30th Anniversary, 100th Anniversary, GT RS)

Torque

150Nm – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

200Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT, Limited Edition)

152Nm – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5)

205Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (GT, MX-5, 30th Anniversary, 100th Anniversary, GT RS)

Transmissions

6-speed Manual

6-speed Sports Automatic (MX-5, GT)

Fuel Consumption

6.1 – 7.4L / 100km

Length

3915mm (2 door Roadster)

3915mm (2 door Targa)

Width

1735mm (2 door Roadster)

1735mm (2 door Targa)

Height

1225 – 1230mm (2 door Roadster)

1235mm (2 door Targa)

Wheelbase

2310mm (2 door Roadster)

2310mm (2 door Targa)

Kerb Weight

1009 – 1080kg (2 door Roadster)

1078 – 1134kg (2 door Targa)

Towing

Not specified

ANCAP Ratings

5 stars (tested 2016)

Body Styles

2 door Roadster

2 door Targa

Engines

1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol

Power

96kW – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

118kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT, Limited Edition)

97kW – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5)

135kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (GT, MX-5, 30th Anniversary, 100th Anniversary, GT RS)

Torque

150Nm – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

200Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT, Limited Edition)

152Nm – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5)

205Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (GT, MX-5, 30th Anniversary, 100th Anniversary, GT RS)

Transmissions

6-speed Manual

6-speed Sports Automatic (MX-5, GT)

Fuel Consumption

6.1 – 7.4L / 100km

Length

3915mm (2 door Roadster)

3915mm (2 door Targa)

Width

1735mm (2 door Roadster)

1735mm (2 door Targa)

Height

1225 – 1230mm (2 door Roadster)

1235mm (2 door Targa)

Wheelbase

2310mm (2 door Roadster)

2310mm (2 door Targa)

Kerb Weight

1009 – 1080kg (2 door Roadster)

1078 – 1134kg (2 door Targa)

Towing

Not specified

ANCAP Ratings

5 stars (tested 2016)

Body Styles

2 door Roadster

2 door Targa

Engines

1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol

Power

96kW – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

118kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT, Limited Edition)

97kW – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5)

135kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (GT, MX-5, 30th Anniversary, 100th Anniversary, GT RS)

Torque

150Nm – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT)

200Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5, GT, Limited Edition)

152Nm – 1.5 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (MX-5)

205Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder aspirated petrol (GT, MX-5, 30th Anniversary, 100th Anniversary, GT RS)

Transmissions

6-speed Manual

6-speed Sports Automatic (MX-5, GT)

Fuel Consumption

6.1 – 7.4L / 100km

Length

3915mm (2 door Roadster)

3915mm (2 door Targa)

Width

1735mm (2 door Roadster)

1735mm (2 door Targa)

Height

1225 – 1230mm (2 door Roadster)

1235mm (2 door Targa)

Wheelbase

2310mm (2 door Roadster)

2310mm (2 door Targa)

Kerb Weight

1009 – 1080kg (2 door Roadster)

1078 – 1134kg (2 door Targa)

Towing

Not specified

ANCAP Ratings

5 stars (tested 2016)

Warranty

3 years / unlimited km

5 years / unlimited km (from Aug 1 2018)

Service Intervals

10,000 km / 12 months

Model range, pricing & features

Mazda MX-5 ND-1

MX-5

Price when new: $31,990 - $44,650

Price used: $16,000 - $43,300

Equipment:

16″ Alloy Wheels
6 Speaker Stereo
ABS (Antilock Brakes)
Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt only
Air Conditioning
Airbag – Driver
Airbag – Passenger
Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
Audio – Aux Input Socket (MP3/CD/Cassette)
Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
Audio – Input for iPod
Bluetooth System
Body Colour – Bumpers
Body Colour – Door Handles
Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Partial
Body Colour – Interior Inserts
Brake Assist
Brake Emergency Display – Hazard/Stoplights
Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
Chrome Exhaust Tip(s)
Control – Electronic Stability
Control – Traction
Cruise Control
Cup Holders – 1st Row
Demister – Rear Windscreen with Timer
Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
Disc Brakes Rear Solid
Drive By Wire (Electronic Throttle Control)
EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
Engine Immobiliser
Glass Rear Window in Soft Top
Handbrake – Fold Down
Headlamps – LED
Hill Holder
Illuminated – Entry/Exit with Fade
Illuminated – Switch Panel (Window/ Locking)
Intermittent Wipers – Variable
Keyless Start:- Key/FOB Proximity related
Leather Gear Knob
Leather Hand Brake Lever
Leather Steering Wheel
Limited Slip Diff
Map/Reading Lamps – for 1st Row
Metallic Finish Interior Inserts
Multi-function Steering Wheel
Power Door Mirrors
Power Steering
Power Steering – Electric Assist
Power Windows – Front only
Rollover Protection – Fixed
Seatbelt – Load Limiters 1st Row (Front)
Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
Seatbelts – Lap/Sash for 2 seats
Softtop
Sunvisor – Vanity Mirror for Driver
Sunvisor – Vanity Mirror for Passenger
Tacho
Tail Lamps – LED
Trim – Cloth
Trip Computer
Tyre Pressure Sensor
Tyre Repair Kit
Blind Spot Sensor
GPS (Satellite Navigation)
Multi-function Control Screen – Colour
Warning – Rear Cross Traffic (when reversing)
Driving Mode – Selectable
Gear Shift Paddles behind Steering Wheel
Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt & Reach
Air Cond. – Climate Control
Camera – Rear Vision
Collision Mitigation – Forward (Low speed)
Collision Warning – Forward
Coloured Door Mirrors
Control – Pedestrian Avoidance with Braking
Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
Painted – Wheels
Parking Assist – Graphical Display
Radio – Digital (DAB+)
Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
Rear View Mirror – Manual Anti-Glare
Speed Zone Reminder – Road Sign Recognition
Starter Button
17″ Alloy Wheels
Daytime Running Lamps – LED
Smart Device App Display/Control
Smart Device Integration – Android Auto
Smart Device Integration – Apple CarPlay
Collision Mitigation – Reversing
Collision Warning – Rearward
Control – Park Distance Rear
Driver Attention Detection
Lane Departure Warning
Rear View Mirror – Electric Anti Glare
Smart Device Integration – Apple Carplay Wireless
Power Roof – Fold-away Hardtop

GT

Price when new: $37,990 - $51,050

Price used: $19,400 - $49,600

Adds:

9 Speaker Stereo
Amplifier – 1 Separate
Central Locking – Key Proximity
Heated Door Mirrors
Heated Seats – 1st Row
Leather Seats – Partial
Premium Sound System
Power Door Mirrors – Heated
Headlamp – High Beam Auto Dipping
Headlamps – Active (Cornering/steering)
Warning – Driver Fatigue
Scuff Plates (on door sills)
Seats – Perforated

100th Anniversary

Price when new: $45,320 - $49,400

Price used: $32,900 - $46,400

Adds:

Floor Mats – Custom
Interior – Badging/ Logo
Seats – Embossed
Wheel Centre Cap with Logo

GT RS

Price when new: $47,020 - $52,050

Price used: $33,900 - $50,600

Adds:

Calipers – Painted Front
Calipers – Painted Rear
Performance Brakes
Suspension – Sports

30th Anniversary

Price when new: $49,990 - $49,990

Price used: $33,500 - $43,300

Adds:

Calipers – Front 4 Spot
Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
Suede Look – Interior Inserts
Suede Look – Seats Partial

Limited Edition

Price when new: $55,790 - $55,790

Price used: $31,500 - $43,000

Adds:

Body Kit – Lower (skirts, F & R Aprons)
Strut Brace – Front

Should you buy one, YES, in fact if you want the perfect fun car, the Mazda ND MX-5 is probably it.

Buying a dedicated sports car rarely involves including logic into the decision making process but the ND MX-5 is simply the logical choice.

It easily provides just as much enjoyment and dynamic depth as far more exotic performance cars when it comes to driving in it’s own unique way.

It’s small and lightweight so like a Lotus Elise, it’s kind to the mechanicals and consumables even when pushed hard yet the MX-5 is substantially more affordable to buy, and it offers a level of practicality and accommodation the Elise could only dream of.

It’s safe and relatively fuel efficient, it’s a Mazda so unlike much of the competition parts and labour are affordable and chances are, very little will go wrong in the first place.

And most importantly, it’s just so much fun all of the time and at any speed. If you’re having a bad day, the ND MX-5 will cheer you up.

In fact not only should you buy an MX-5, everyone should have an MX-5, it would make the world a better place.

Should you buy one, YES, in fact if you want the perfect fun car, the Mazda ND MX-5 is probably it.

Buying a dedicated sports car rarely involves including logic into the decision making process but the ND MX-5 is simply the logical choice.

It easily provides just as much enjoyment and dynamic depth as far more exotic performance cars when it comes to driving in it’s own unique way.

It’s small and lightweight so like a Lotus Elise, it’s kind to the mechanicals and consumables even when pushed hard yet the MX-5 is substantially more affordable to buy, and it offers a level of practicality and accommodation the Elise could only dream of.

It’s safe and relatively fuel efficient, it’s a Mazda so unlike much of the competition parts and labour are affordable and chances are, very little will go wrong in the first place.

And most importantly, it’s just so much fun all of the time and at any speed. If you’re having a bad day, the ND MX-5 will cheer you up.

In fact not only should you buy an MX-5, everyone should have an MX-5, it would make the world a better place.

Should you buy one, YES, in fact if you want the perfect fun car, the Mazda ND MX-5 is probably it.

Buying a dedicated sports car rarely involves including logic into the decision making process but the ND MX-5 is simply the logical choice.

It easily provides just as much enjoyment and dynamic depth as far more exotic performance cars when it comes to driving in it’s own unique way.

It’s small and lightweight so like a Lotus Elise, it’s kind to the mechanicals and consumables even when pushed hard yet the MX-5 is substantially more affordable to buy, and it offers a level of practicality and accommodation the Elise could only dream of.

It’s safe and relatively fuel efficient, it’s a Mazda so unlike much of the competition parts and labour are affordable and chances are, very little will go wrong in the first place.

And most importantly, it’s just so much fun all of the time and at any speed. If you’re having a bad day, the ND MX-5 will cheer you up.

In fact not only should you buy an MX-5, everyone should have an MX-5, it would make the world a better place.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of July 21, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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