Pros

  • Arguably all the performance Porsche anyone would ever need.
  • Offer all the key Porsche experience with a huge discount.
  • Cared for examples showing very good reliability.
  • Potentially the perfect blend of modern features with analogue experience.

Cons

  • Many used examples have missed critical maintenance.
  • It’s a Porsche, parts and labour will ask a premium.
  • Requires fastidious ownership care.
  • Incorrectly regarded by many as a lesser Porsche.

Verdict

Should you consider purchasing a Porsche 987? If we’re discussing pre-update Caymans, we would advise against it. While undeniably exceptional when in optimal condition, the associated maintenance costs and reliability concerns make it a less-than-ideal choice. Additionally, in automatic form, the mechanically robust tip-tronic lacks the driving finesse found in...

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Publish: December 17, 2023

As you’re likely aware, the Porsche Cayman is ostensibly the hardtop sports car version of the mid-engined convertible Porsche Boxster. However, this inclination arguably classifies it as the more focused driver’s car. In this overview, we’ll concentrate on the first-generation Cayman, known as the 987. This model is essentially akin to the second-generation Boxster, a vehicle deserving of its own ReDriven Cheat Sheet.

In Australia, the Cayman was primarily available in two specifications: the standard Cayman and the more potent Cayman S. Additionally, two special editions were introduced—the Black Edition and the performance-oriented Cayman R.

A noteworthy development occurred with the 2009 mid-cycle update for this generation. Beyond the obligatory visual and equipment enhancements, the updated 987 underwent significant changes. The engines featured in these models were substantially updated from 2.7 L and 3.4 L Flat 6’s to 2.9 L and honed and improved 3.4 L Flat 6 units, with Porsche opting for a dual-clutch PDK unit, discarding the previous tip-tronic automatic option. Brake systems, suspension, and overall dynamics were also improved to align with these changes.

Given its Porsche lineage, the Cayman 987 boasts an extensive list of optional features, and prospective buyers are advised to familiarise themselves with these options, as there are examples on the market with substantial add-ons.

While the 987 Cayman may seem to offer excellent value for money, appearances can be deceiving. Further details on engine outputs and specifications are outlined in the technical specifications below. For a more nuanced understanding of the risks

As you’re likely aware, the Porsche Cayman is ostensibly the hardtop sports car version of the mid-engined convertible Porsche Boxster. However, this inclination arguably classifies it as the more focused driver’s car. In this overview, we’ll concentrate on the first-generation Cayman, known as the 987. This model is essentially akin to the second-generation Boxster, a vehicle deserving of its own ReDriven Cheat Sheet.

In Australia, the Cayman was primarily available in two specifications: the standard Cayman and the more potent Cayman S. Additionally, two special editions were introduced—the Black Edition and the performance-oriented Cayman R.

A noteworthy development occurred with the 2009 mid-cycle update for this generation. Beyond the obligatory visual and equipment enhancements, the updated 987 underwent significant changes. The engines featured in these models were substantially updated from 2.7 L and 3.4 L Flat 6’s to 2.9 L and honed and improved 3.4 L Flat 6 units, with Porsche opting for a dual-clutch PDK unit, discarding the previous tip-tronic automatic option. Brake systems, suspension, and overall dynamics were also improved to align with these changes.

Given its Porsche lineage, the Cayman 987 boasts an extensive list of optional features, and prospective buyers are advised to familiarise themselves with these options, as there are examples on the market with substantial add-ons.

While the 987 Cayman may seem to offer excellent value for money, appearances can be deceiving. Further details on engine outputs and specifications are outlined in the technical specifications below. For a more nuanced understanding of the risks and what can go wrong, read on to discover additional insights.

As you’re likely aware, the Porsche Cayman is ostensibly the hardtop sports car version of the mid-engined convertible Porsche Boxster. However, this inclination arguably classifies it as the more focused driver’s car. In this overview, we’ll concentrate on the first-generation Cayman, known as the 987. This model is essentially akin to the second-generation Boxster, a vehicle deserving of its own ReDriven Cheat Sheet.

In Australia, the Cayman was primarily available in two specifications: the standard Cayman and the more potent Cayman S. Additionally, two special editions were introduced—the Black Edition and the performance-oriented Cayman R.

A noteworthy development occurred with the 2009 mid-cycle update for this generation. Beyond the obligatory visual and equipment enhancements, the updated 987 underwent significant changes. The engines featured in these models were substantially updated from 2.7 L and 3.4 L Flat 6’s to 2.9 L and honed and improved 3.4 L Flat 6 units, with Porsche opting for a dual-clutch PDK unit, discarding the previous tip-tronic automatic option. Brake systems, suspension, and overall dynamics were also improved to align with these changes.

Given its Porsche lineage, the Cayman 987 boasts an extensive list of optional features, and prospective buyers are advised to familiarise themselves with these options, as there are examples on the market with substantial add-ons.

While the 987 Cayman may seem to offer excellent value for money, appearances can be deceiving. Further details on engine outputs and specifications are outlined in the technical specifications below. For a more nuanced understanding of the risks and what can go wrong, read on to discover additional insights.

Exterior:

The Porsche 987 Cayman exhibits vulnerability in its headlights, susceptible to stone chips and cracks. While light scratches can be polished out, replacing a damaged light can be a costly affair, ranging from hundreds to over $1000. Owners often recommend opting for the Bi-xenon headlights if a replacement becomes necessary. Yellowing or fading of headlights is a common issue, but easily remedied with numerous online tutorials.

The climate condensers and radiators, positioned low in the front, are prone to corrosion, stone chips, and potential leaks. The front lower intakes can accumulate debris, necessitating a thorough air-con test during a pre-purchase inspection to avoid costly component replacements.

Gas struts holding the bonnet open may show signs of wear but are relatively inexpensive to replace. Tailgate rattling can occur due to misaligned hinges or worn seals, usually not a cause for concern unless indicating poor repairs post-accident.

Any signs of rust on a Cayman should raise red flags, suggesting potential issues with accident repairs.

 

Interior:

Headliner issues often arise, with the roof fabric delaminating and falling in.

Cable wear on door handles is common, leading to handles sticking out.

Interior plastics may experience brittleness, cracking, or peeling surface finishes.

Water ingress can cause complications, often from blocked drainage holes or faulty rubber seals. These demand close inspection, especially behind the front seats.

For the Boxster variant, ensuring the roof mechanism works flawlessly and checking for leaks, possibly by simulating rain, is crucial.

Owners have reported various issues with cup holders, but most are easily fixable with online tutorials.

The air conditioning blend door foam can disintegrate, affecting climate control over time and blowing foam debris into the cabin.

We highly recommend joining 987 owners groups for detailed insights and advice.

 

Mechanically:

Addressing the notorious IMS (intermediate shaft bearing) issue, early models faced potential failures causing catastrophic engine damage. However, ignoring the hysteria often found online, only a very small percentage of the early 987s actually fail due to this and if the IMS was replaced and upgraded as a preventative maintenance measure (which many are) it’s unlikely to be an issue. Preventative maintenance measures, frequent oil changes, and occasional spirited driving, the theory being that the bearing is lubricated more substantially at higher engine RPM, can all mitigate risks.

Bore scoring issues, causing excessive oil consumption, again primarily affected earlier models. However, this needs to be investigated by a specialist prior to purchase.

Oil leaks, often from the rear main seal and spark plug tubes, are common in aging Porsches like the 987.

Issues with the AOS (Air Oil Separator) can produce smoke on start-up but are relatively inexpensive to fix. Coolant leaks, particularly from the expansion tank and

Exterior:

The Porsche 987 Cayman exhibits vulnerability in its headlights, susceptible to stone chips and cracks. While light scratches can be polished out, replacing a damaged light can be a costly affair, ranging from hundreds to over $1000. Owners often recommend opting for the Bi-xenon headlights if a replacement becomes necessary. Yellowing or fading of headlights is a common issue, but easily remedied with numerous online tutorials.

The climate condensers and radiators, positioned low in the front, are prone to corrosion, stone chips, and potential leaks. The front lower intakes can accumulate debris, necessitating a thorough air-con test during a pre-purchase inspection to avoid costly component replacements.

Gas struts holding the bonnet open may show signs of wear but are relatively inexpensive to replace. Tailgate rattling can occur due to misaligned hinges or worn seals, usually not a cause for concern unless indicating poor repairs post-accident.

Any signs of rust on a Cayman should raise red flags, suggesting potential issues with accident repairs.

 

Interior:

Headliner issues often arise, with the roof fabric delaminating and falling in.

Cable wear on door handles is common, leading to handles sticking out.

Interior plastics may experience brittleness, cracking, or peeling surface finishes.

Water ingress can cause complications, often from blocked drainage holes or faulty rubber seals. These demand close inspection, especially behind the front seats.

For the Boxster variant, ensuring the roof mechanism works flawlessly and checking for leaks, possibly by simulating rain, is crucial.

Owners have reported various issues with cup holders, but most are easily fixable with online tutorials.

The air conditioning blend door foam can disintegrate, affecting climate control over time and blowing foam debris into the cabin.

We highly recommend joining 987 owners groups for detailed insights and advice.

 

Mechanically:

Addressing the notorious IMS (intermediate shaft bearing) issue, early models faced potential failures causing catastrophic engine damage. However, ignoring the hysteria often found online, only a very small percentage of the early 987s actually fail due to this and if the IMS was replaced and upgraded as a preventative maintenance measure (which many are) it’s unlikely to be an issue. Preventative maintenance measures, frequent oil changes, and occasional spirited driving, the theory being that the bearing is lubricated more substantially at higher engine RPM, can all mitigate risks.

Bore scoring issues, causing excessive oil consumption, again primarily affected earlier models. However, this needs to be investigated by a specialist prior to purchase.

Oil leaks, often from the rear main seal and spark plug tubes, are common in aging Porsches like the 987.

Issues with the AOS (Air Oil Separator) can produce smoke on start-up but are relatively inexpensive to fix. Coolant leaks, particularly from the expansion tank and water pumps, are prevalent, require attention. Brakes and suspension components, such as lower control arm bushes, are worn items needing replacement every 40-60k kilometres.

Servicing and repair costs are comparatively high not only because it’s a Porsche but often due to challenging access to engine components.

Manual transmissions are generally reliable, though selector cables can break. Not a difficult or expensive repair.

Pre-update Tip-tronic gearboxes are solid but lack the fun factor of PDK, which, while not unreliable, incurs high repair costs if or when issues arise.

Before paying a premium for genuine Porsche components, the 987 Cayman benefits from a robust aftermarket parts market and abundant DIY resources, making it an excellent platform for enthusiasts, even those on a tighter budget.

In summary, the 987 Cayman falls into two categories: meticulously maintained examples owned by passionate and financial enthusiasts, likely to be very reliable, and neglected ones owned by those possibly not in the financial position to afford a Porsche, therefore cutting corners, causing significant headaches for the unprepared future owners.

Exterior:

The Porsche 987 Cayman exhibits vulnerability in its headlights, susceptible to stone chips and cracks. While light scratches can be polished out, replacing a damaged light can be a costly affair, ranging from hundreds to over $1000. Owners often recommend opting for the Bi-xenon headlights if a replacement becomes necessary. Yellowing or fading of headlights is a common issue, but easily remedied with numerous online tutorials.

The climate condensers and radiators, positioned low in the front, are prone to corrosion, stone chips, and potential leaks. The front lower intakes can accumulate debris, necessitating a thorough air-con test during a pre-purchase inspection to avoid costly component replacements.

Gas struts holding the bonnet open may show signs of wear but are relatively inexpensive to replace. Tailgate rattling can occur due to misaligned hinges or worn seals, usually not a cause for concern unless indicating poor repairs post-accident.

Any signs of rust on a Cayman should raise red flags, suggesting potential issues with accident repairs.

 

Interior:

Headliner issues often arise, with the roof fabric delaminating and falling in.

Cable wear on door handles is common, leading to handles sticking out.

Interior plastics may experience brittleness, cracking, or peeling surface finishes.

Water ingress can cause complications, often from blocked drainage holes or faulty rubber seals. These demand close inspection, especially behind the front seats.

For the Boxster variant, ensuring the roof mechanism works flawlessly and checking for leaks, possibly by simulating rain, is crucial.

Owners have reported various issues with cup holders, but most are easily fixable with online tutorials.

The air conditioning blend door foam can disintegrate, affecting climate control over time and blowing foam debris into the cabin.

We highly recommend joining 987 owners groups for detailed insights and advice.

 

Mechanically:

Addressing the notorious IMS (intermediate shaft bearing) issue, early models faced potential failures causing catastrophic engine damage. However, ignoring the hysteria often found online, only a very small percentage of the early 987s actually fail due to this and if the IMS was replaced and upgraded as a preventative maintenance measure (which many are) it’s unlikely to be an issue. Preventative maintenance measures, frequent oil changes, and occasional spirited driving, the theory being that the bearing is lubricated more substantially at higher engine RPM, can all mitigate risks.

Bore scoring issues, causing excessive oil consumption, again primarily affected earlier models. However, this needs to be investigated by a specialist prior to purchase.

Oil leaks, often from the rear main seal and spark plug tubes, are common in aging Porsches like the 987.

Issues with the AOS (Air Oil Separator) can produce smoke on start-up but are relatively inexpensive to fix. Coolant leaks, particularly from the expansion tank and water pumps, are prevalent, require attention. Brakes and suspension components, such as lower control arm bushes, are worn items needing replacement every 40-60k kilometres.

Servicing and repair costs are comparatively high not only because it’s a Porsche but often due to challenging access to engine components.

Manual transmissions are generally reliable, though selector cables can break. Not a difficult or expensive repair.

Pre-update Tip-tronic gearboxes are solid but lack the fun factor of PDK, which, while not unreliable, incurs high repair costs if or when issues arise.

Before paying a premium for genuine Porsche components, the 987 Cayman benefits from a robust aftermarket parts market and abundant DIY resources, making it an excellent platform for enthusiasts, even those on a tighter budget.

In summary, the 987 Cayman falls into two categories: meticulously maintained examples owned by passionate and financial enthusiasts, likely to be very reliable, and neglected ones owned by those possibly not in the financial position to afford a Porsche, therefore cutting corners, causing significant headaches for the unprepared future owners.

Body Styles

  • 2 door Coupe

Engine Specs

  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 217kW / 340Nm (S 2006 – 2008)
  • 2.7 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 180kW / 273Nm (Cayman 2006 – 2008)
  • 2.9 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 195kW / 300Nm (Cayman 2008 – 2011)
  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 235kW / 370Nm (S 2008 – 2011)
  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 243kW / 370Nm (S Black Edition 2011, R 2011)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (S, Cayman, S Black Edition, R)
  • 5-speed Sports Automatic (S, Cayman)
  • 5-speed Manual (Cayman)
  • 7-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (Cayman, S, s, S Black Edition, R)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.5 – 13.9 / 100km (S)
  • 6.4 – 13.3 / 100km (Cayman)
  • 6.6 – 14.1 / 100km (S Black Edition)
  • 6.6 – 14.0 / 100km (R)

Length

  • 4341mm – 4347mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1801mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1285mm – 1305mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2415mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1260kg – 1380kg (All Models)

Towing

  • Not listed (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Body Styles

  • 2 door Coupe

Engine Specs

  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 217kW / 340Nm (S 2006 – 2008)
  • 2.7 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 180kW / 273Nm (Cayman 2006 – 2008)
  • 2.9 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 195kW / 300Nm (Cayman 2008 – 2011)
  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 235kW / 370Nm (S 2008 – 2011)
  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 243kW / 370Nm (S Black Edition 2011, R 2011)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (S, Cayman, S Black Edition, R)
  • 5-speed Sports Automatic (S, Cayman)
  • 5-speed Manual (Cayman)
  • 7-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (Cayman, S, s, S Black Edition, R)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.5 – 13.9 / 100km (S)
  • 6.4 – 13.3 / 100km (Cayman)
  • 6.6 – 14.1 / 100km (S Black Edition)
  • 6.6 – 14.0 / 100km (R)

Length

  • 4341mm – 4347mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1801mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1285mm – 1305mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2415mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1260kg – 1380kg (All Models)

Towing

  • Not listed (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Body Styles

  • 2 door Coupe

Engine Specs

  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 217kW / 340Nm (S 2006 – 2008)
  • 2.7 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 180kW / 273Nm (Cayman 2006 – 2008)
  • 2.9 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 195kW / 300Nm (Cayman 2008 – 2011)
  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 235kW / 370Nm (S 2008 – 2011)
  • 3.4 litre, 6-cylinder petrol, 243kW / 370Nm (S Black Edition 2011, R 2011)

Transmission

  • 6-speed Manual (S, Cayman, S Black Edition, R)
  • 5-speed Sports Automatic (S, Cayman)
  • 5-speed Manual (Cayman)
  • 7-speed Sports Automatic Dual Clutch (Cayman, S, s, S Black Edition, R)

Fuel Consumption

  • 6.5 – 13.9 / 100km (S)
  • 6.4 – 13.3 / 100km (Cayman)
  • 6.6 – 14.1 / 100km (S Black Edition)
  • 6.6 – 14.0 / 100km (R)

Length

  • 4341mm – 4347mm (All Models)

Width

  • 1801mm (All Models)

Height

  • 1285mm – 1305mm (All Models)

Wheelbase

  • 2415mm (All Models)

Kerb Weight

  • 1260kg – 1380kg (All Models)

Towing

  • Not listed (All Models)

Ancap Ratings

  • Not tested (All Models)

Warranty

  • 2 years / unlimited km (S, Cayman)
  • 3 years / unlimited km (Cayman, S, s, S Black Edition, R)

Servicing

  • 15,000 km / 12 months (All Models)

Model range, pricing & features

Porsche Cayman R-10

S

Price when new: $147,500 - $155,300

Price used: $34,700 - $62,500

Equipment

  • 18″ Alloy Wheels
  • 9 Speaker Stereo
  • ABS (Antilock Brakes)
  • Air Cond. – Climate Control
  • Air Conditioning – Pollen Filter
  • Airbag – Driver
  • Airbag – Passenger
  • Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
  • Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
  • Alarm with Motion Sensor
  • Automatic Brake Differential
  • Body Colour – Bumpers
  • Body Colour – Door Handles
  • Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Full
  • Brake Assist
  • CD Stacker – 6 disc
  • Calipers – Painted Front
  • Calipers – Painted Rear
  • Cargo Net
  • Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
  • Clock – Digital
  • Control – Electronic Stability
  • Control – Traction
  • Cruise Control
  • Cup Holders – 1st Row
  • Disc Brakes Front Vented Drilled/Grooved
  • Disc Brakes Rear Vented Drilled/Grooved
  • Drive By Wire (Electronic Throttle Control)
  • EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
  • Electric Seats – 1st Row (Front)
  • Engine Immobiliser
  • Exhaust – Stainless Steel Dual System
  • Fog Lamp/s – Rear
  • Fog Lamps – Front
  • Gauges – Metallic Faces
  • Headlamps – Clear Lenses
  • Headlamps – See me home
  • Heat Insulated – Side Windows
  • Intermittent Wipers – Variable
  • Leather Gear Knob
  • Leather Inserts in doors
  • Leather Seats
  • Leather Steering Wheel
  • Leather Trimmed – (Whole) Dash Cover
  • Map/Reading Lamps – for 1st Row
  • Metallic Finish Air Vents (interior)
  • Metallic Finish Centre Console
  • Metallic Finish Dash Board
  • Metallic Finish Gear Shift Gate
  • Metallic Finish Interior Inserts
  • Metallic Finish Steering Wheel
  • Multi-function Control Screen
  • On-board Computer
  • Pedals – Sports
  • Power Door Mirrors – Heated
  • Power Steering – Active (Ratio Speed related)
  • Power Windows – Front only
  • Remote Boot/Hatch Release
  • Seatbelt – Load Limiters 1st Row (Front)
  • Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
  • Spoiler – Rear Electric
  • Sports Exhaust
  • Tacho
  • Trip Computer
  • Vented – Guards Rear

 

MY07 update

  • Metallic Finish Gear Knob
  • Metallic Finish Switch Panel
  • Scuff Plates – Embossed or personalised
  • Sports Instruments

 

MY09 update

  • Metallic Finish Door Handles – Interior

Cayman

Price when new: $115,100 - $122,200

Price used: $29,600 - $50,000

Adds

  • 17″ Alloy Wheels
  • Exhaust – Stainless Steel Single System
  • Metallic Finish Instrument Surrounds
  • Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)

 

MY09 update

  • Audio – Aux Input Socket (MP3/CD/Cassette)
  • Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
  • Audio – Input for iPod
  • Audio – MP3 Decoder
  • Colour Display Screen – Front
  • Control – Park Distance Rear
  • DVD Player – 6 Disc Stacker
  • Door Pockets – 1st row (Front)
  • Driving Lamps
  • Electric Seat – Drivers with Memory
  • Footwell Lamps – Front
  • GPS (Satellite Navigation)
  • Hill Holder
  • Leather Trimmed – Centre Console
  • Leather Trimmed – Door Opener Trim
  • Power Door Mirrors – with Memory
  • Scuff Plates (on door sills)
  • Seat – Driver with Electric Lumbar
  • Seat – Passenger with Electric Lumbar
  • Storage Compartment – Centre Console 1st Row
  • Water Repellant – Side Windows

MY10 update

  • Bluetooth System

MY11 update

  • Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt & Reach
  • Air Conditioning – Sensor for Pollutants
  • Ambient Lighting – Interior
  • CD Player
  • CD Stacker – 6 disc In Dash/Cabin
  • Calipers – Front 4 Spot
  • Calipers – Rear 4 Spot
  • Leather Hand Brake Lever
  • Leather Seats – Partial
  • Steering Wheel – Sports
  • Sunvisor – Illuminated Vanity Mirrors Dual

S Black Edition

Price when new: $147,500

Price used: $56,200 - $62,500

Adds

  • 19″ Alloy Wheels
  • Gloss Finish Inserts
  • Headlamps – Active (Cornering/steering)
  • Headlamps – Bi-Xenon (for low & high beam)
  • Leather Seats – Embossed
  • Paint – Black
  • Painted – Wheels

R

Price when new: $165,000

Price used: $61,400 - $69,800

Adds

  • Body Colour – Fittings
  • Decals
  • Gauges – Coloured Dials
  • Headlamps – Blacked Out Surrounds
  • Leather – Armrest Front
  • Seats – Bucket (Front)
  • Spoiler – Front
  • Spoiler – Rear

Should you consider purchasing a Porsche 987? If we’re discussing pre-update Caymans, we would advise against it. While undeniably exceptional when in optimal condition, the associated maintenance costs and reliability concerns make it a less-than-ideal choice. Additionally, in automatic form, the mechanically robust tip-tronic lacks the driving finesse found in the updated models with the PDK transmission.

Considering the cost on the used market, numerous alternatives offer comparable value, driving experience and appeal.

On the flip side, for post-updated Caymans, if the pre-purchase inspection clears and you are aware of the commitment involved, not only should you consider buying one, but it stands out as a top choice among performance cars in this budget range and beyond.

This model not only satisfies all the criteria for a premium car but also stands as one of the finest driver’s cars available across various budgets. Its exceptional performance can be enjoyed even at sensible speeds.

Acknowledging their imperfections and the financial commitment associated with owning a used Porsche, the Cayman, especially the Cayman R if available, emerges as a compelling option. While it may not stroke your ego like a 911, if the latest flashy car isn’t a prerequisite for your self-esteem, the Cayman is a worthwhile choice.

Should you consider purchasing a Porsche 987? If we’re discussing pre-update Caymans, we would advise against it. While undeniably exceptional when in optimal condition, the associated maintenance costs and reliability concerns make it a less-than-ideal choice. Additionally, in automatic form, the mechanically robust tip-tronic lacks the driving finesse found in the updated models with the PDK transmission.

Considering the cost on the used market, numerous alternatives offer comparable value, driving experience and appeal.

On the flip side, for post-updated Caymans, if the pre-purchase inspection clears and you are aware of the commitment involved, not only should you consider buying one, but it stands out as a top choice among performance cars in this budget range and beyond.

This model not only satisfies all the criteria for a premium car but also stands as one of the finest driver’s cars available across various budgets. Its exceptional performance can be enjoyed even at sensible speeds.

Acknowledging their imperfections and the financial commitment associated with owning a used Porsche, the Cayman, especially the Cayman R if available, emerges as a compelling option. While it may not stroke your ego like a 911, if the latest flashy car isn’t a prerequisite for your self-esteem, the Cayman is a worthwhile choice.

Should you consider purchasing a Porsche 987? If we’re discussing pre-update Caymans, we would advise against it. While undeniably exceptional when in optimal condition, the associated maintenance costs and reliability concerns make it a less-than-ideal choice. Additionally, in automatic form, the mechanically robust tip-tronic lacks the driving finesse found in the updated models with the PDK transmission.

Considering the cost on the used market, numerous alternatives offer comparable value, driving experience and appeal.

On the flip side, for post-updated Caymans, if the pre-purchase inspection clears and you are aware of the commitment involved, not only should you consider buying one, but it stands out as a top choice among performance cars in this budget range and beyond.

This model not only satisfies all the criteria for a premium car but also stands as one of the finest driver’s cars available across various budgets. Its exceptional performance can be enjoyed even at sensible speeds.

Acknowledging their imperfections and the financial commitment associated with owning a used Porsche, the Cayman, especially the Cayman R if available, emerges as a compelling option. While it may not stroke your ego like a 911, if the latest flashy car isn’t a prerequisite for your self-esteem, the Cayman is a worthwhile choice.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of Dec 15, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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