Pros

  • Stunning interior and exterior design.
  • Immense off-road ability yet delightful to drive on-road.
  • Excellent practicality.
  • Seems to offer incredible value for money, however….

Cons

  • Arguably one of the least reliable and most problem-riddled vehicles money can buy.
  • Expensive parts and labour costs.
  • Reliability requires fastidious maintenance.
  • Many on the used market have not been maintained correctly. 

Verdict

While there are instances of Range Rover Sports that have remained unscathed by the commonly reported issues, it’s essential to acknowledge that the problems we’ve discussed represent the more prevalent faults. However, the list of less frequent yet still impactful issues affecting thousands of vehicles is alarmingly extensive. The consistent...

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Throughout the lifespan of the Range Rover Sport (L320), the Land Rover Range Rover brand underwent a series of ownership changes akin to a game of backyard football among parent companies. The initial conception of the Sport took shape during BMW’s tenure at the helm. However, when the development and production phases commenced, the reins had been passed to Ford. Subsequently, in the midst of the Sport’s production cycle, Ford made the strategic decision to transfer ownership of Land Rover Range Rover to the Indian automotive powerhouse, Tata. This transition of ownership may shed light on some of the issues we will delve into shortly.

For prospective buyers in the pre-owned market, there are two iterations of the first-generation L320 Range Rover Sport to consider. The initial version spans from 2005 to 2009 and was available in Australia with a choice of two diesel powerplants—a turbocharged V6 and a twin-turbo V8—as well as two petrol options: a 4.4-litre V8 and a 4.2-litre Supercharged V8. The engine selection denoted the specific variant, as demonstrated here. Furthermore, a limited First Edition model was offered alongside these choices. Additionally, the first iteration received a minor cosmetic update in 2008. The more significant transformation, however, arrived with the introduction of the Series 2 in 2009.

The Series 2 not only ushered in a range of exterior design alterations but also witnessed updates to the interior, technology, and features. Comprehensive revisions were executed to the suspension, steering systems, and the entire mechanical configuration. This revamp

Throughout the lifespan of the Range Rover Sport (L320), the Land Rover Range Rover brand underwent a series of ownership changes akin to a game of backyard football among parent companies. The initial conception of the Sport took shape during BMW’s tenure at the helm. However, when the development and production phases commenced, the reins had been passed to Ford. Subsequently, in the midst of the Sport’s production cycle, Ford made the strategic decision to transfer ownership of Land Rover Range Rover to the Indian automotive powerhouse, Tata. This transition of ownership may shed light on some of the issues we will delve into shortly.

For prospective buyers in the pre-owned market, there are two iterations of the first-generation L320 Range Rover Sport to consider. The initial version spans from 2005 to 2009 and was available in Australia with a choice of two diesel powerplants—a turbocharged V6 and a twin-turbo V8—as well as two petrol options: a 4.4-litre V8 and a 4.2-litre Supercharged V8. The engine selection denoted the specific variant, as demonstrated here. Furthermore, a limited First Edition model was offered alongside these choices. Additionally, the first iteration received a minor cosmetic update in 2008. The more significant transformation, however, arrived with the introduction of the Series 2 in 2009.

The Series 2 not only ushered in a range of exterior design alterations but also witnessed updates to the interior, technology, and features. Comprehensive revisions were executed to the suspension, steering systems, and the entire mechanical configuration. This revamp led to the discontinuation of the 2.7-litre turbo-diesel V6 and 4.2-litre V8, replaced respectively by a 3.0-litre twin-turbo diesel V6 and a 5.0-litre V8 petrol engine. The latter was available in both naturally aspirated and supercharged variations. Furthermore, the nomenclature underwent a shift, contingent upon the engine choice. The lineup now encompassed the Sport, Luxury, and the apex Autobiography.

It’s worth noting that these models could be further customized through an extensive selection of optional accessories and enhancement packs, such as the Silver, Black, or Platinum packs. Paralleling the Series 1, a more minor cosmetic update was introduced in 2012.

Despite the fact that the majority of Range Rover Sports may never encounter off-road terrain, it’s important to recognize its capability in this domain. Beneath the alluring exterior, the vehicle is built upon a modified Land Rover Discovery platform, encompassing elements such as the chassis, suspension, and off-road technology—a comprehensive package tailored to rugged performance.

However, as appealing as all this may seem, trouble is ahead.

Throughout the lifespan of the Range Rover Sport (L320), the Land Rover Range Rover brand underwent a series of ownership changes akin to a game of backyard football among parent companies. The initial conception of the Sport took shape during BMW’s tenure at the helm. However, when the development and production phases commenced, the reins had been passed to Ford. Subsequently, in the midst of the Sport’s production cycle, Ford made the strategic decision to transfer ownership of Land Rover Range Rover to the Indian automotive powerhouse, Tata. This transition of ownership may shed light on some of the issues we will delve into shortly.

For prospective buyers in the pre-owned market, there are two iterations of the first-generation L320 Range Rover Sport to consider. The initial version spans from 2005 to 2009 and was available in Australia with a choice of two diesel powerplants—a turbocharged V6 and a twin-turbo V8—as well as two petrol options: a 4.4-litre V8 and a 4.2-litre Supercharged V8. The engine selection denoted the specific variant, as demonstrated here. Furthermore, a limited First Edition model was offered alongside these choices. Additionally, the first iteration received a minor cosmetic update in 2008. The more significant transformation, however, arrived with the introduction of the Series 2 in 2009.

The Series 2 not only ushered in a range of exterior design alterations but also witnessed updates to the interior, technology, and features. Comprehensive revisions were executed to the suspension, steering systems, and the entire mechanical configuration. This revamp led to the discontinuation of the 2.7-litre turbo-diesel V6 and 4.2-litre V8, replaced respectively by a 3.0-litre twin-turbo diesel V6 and a 5.0-litre V8 petrol engine. The latter was available in both naturally aspirated and supercharged variations. Furthermore, the nomenclature underwent a shift, contingent upon the engine choice. The lineup now encompassed the Sport, Luxury, and the apex Autobiography.

It’s worth noting that these models could be further customized through an extensive selection of optional accessories and enhancement packs, such as the Silver, Black, or Platinum packs. Paralleling the Series 1, a more minor cosmetic update was introduced in 2012.

Despite the fact that the majority of Range Rover Sports may never encounter off-road terrain, it’s important to recognize its capability in this domain. Beneath the alluring exterior, the vehicle is built upon a modified Land Rover Discovery platform, encompassing elements such as the chassis, suspension, and off-road technology—a comprehensive package tailored to rugged performance.

However, as appealing as all this may seem, trouble is ahead.

Navigating the world of Range Rovers presents a challenge, notably due to their well-known reliability issues and occasionally less-than-stellar customer service, the latter being the more prominent concern.

The trajectory of Range Rovers, transitioning from the P38 Range Rover and original Discovery, has been characterized by a shift towards a more luxurious off-road experience, establishing a market benchmark that other manufacturers strive to emulate.

Let’s begin by examining the exterior aspects.

When evaluating the exterior condition, it’s important to note that body panels should be free from rust. However, vehicles in colder climates might exhibit rust on the undercarriage. A thorough inspection of the car, especially beneath plastic trim and fender protectors, is recommended.

Electrical components have been known to present issues and failures. These encompass power folding mirrors, parking sensors, door locks, as well as potential head and taillight problems. At times, the root cause can be related to wiring complications. It is advisable to ensure that all electronic features are fully operational before making a purchase.

For vehicles equipped with detachable tow bars, electronic glitches can arise when towing a trailer. Faulty tow bars can lead to rear fog light malfunctions upon detaching the tow bar.

The electric parking brake can pose challenges, and it’s crucial to listen for unusual grinding or other concerning sounds. These could indicate an incorrectly adjusted parking brake. Ignoring these noises could lead to a range of complications, including instances where owners have found themselves stranded due to parking brake issues.

Water leaks are a recurrent issue, with sunroof drains being a common source. Similar to other vehicles, these drains can become clogged. Additionally, there can be complications with the endings of the drain hoses. In cases of clogging, cleaning the drains with compressed air or a thin-edge trimmer line is usually effective. However, there are instances where the rubber endings of these drain holes detach. Located behind plastic side vents on both sides of the car, these rubber endings can deteriorate over time. Consequently, the rubber hose slides inside, causing water from the sunroof to pour into the car’s sides. This can be problematic, considering that the main wiring loom is also located in this vicinity, exposing it to potential water damage. Water and electricity, as we know, do not mix well.

Other concerns include the potential delamination of the rear spoiler and fading finish on the B and C pillars over time. The windshield cowl beneath the windscreen wipers can warp due to aging, leading to compromised sealing against the windshield. This exposes the HVAC inlet to water ingress, a less-than-ideal scenario.

Interestingly, it appears that these issues tend to be more prevalent in pre-update Sports. However, post-update models are not

Navigating the world of Range Rovers presents a challenge, notably due to their well-known reliability issues and occasionally less-than-stellar customer service, the latter being the more prominent concern.

The trajectory of Range Rovers, transitioning from the P38 Range Rover and original Discovery, has been characterized by a shift towards a more luxurious off-road experience, establishing a market benchmark that other manufacturers strive to emulate.

Let’s begin by examining the exterior aspects.

When evaluating the exterior condition, it’s important to note that body panels should be free from rust. However, vehicles in colder climates might exhibit rust on the undercarriage. A thorough inspection of the car, especially beneath plastic trim and fender protectors, is recommended.

Electrical components have been known to present issues and failures. These encompass power folding mirrors, parking sensors, door locks, as well as potential head and taillight problems. At times, the root cause can be related to wiring complications. It is advisable to ensure that all electronic features are fully operational before making a purchase.

For vehicles equipped with detachable tow bars, electronic glitches can arise when towing a trailer. Faulty tow bars can lead to rear fog light malfunctions upon detaching the tow bar.

The electric parking brake can pose challenges, and it’s crucial to listen for unusual grinding or other concerning sounds. These could indicate an incorrectly adjusted parking brake. Ignoring these noises could lead to a range of complications, including instances where owners have found themselves stranded due to parking brake issues.

Water leaks are a recurrent issue, with sunroof drains being a common source. Similar to other vehicles, these drains can become clogged. Additionally, there can be complications with the endings of the drain hoses. In cases of clogging, cleaning the drains with compressed air or a thin-edge trimmer line is usually effective. However, there are instances where the rubber endings of these drain holes detach. Located behind plastic side vents on both sides of the car, these rubber endings can deteriorate over time. Consequently, the rubber hose slides inside, causing water from the sunroof to pour into the car’s sides. This can be problematic, considering that the main wiring loom is also located in this vicinity, exposing it to potential water damage. Water and electricity, as we know, do not mix well.

Other concerns include the potential delamination of the rear spoiler and fading finish on the B and C pillars over time. The windshield cowl beneath the windscreen wipers can warp due to aging, leading to compromised sealing against the windshield. This exposes the HVAC inlet to water ingress, a less-than-ideal scenario.

Interestingly, it appears that these issues tend to be more prevalent in pre-update Sports. However, post-update models are not entirely immune to these challenges.

Moving on, one of the most common complaints pertains to the battery and its voracious appetite for electrical power. This is often overlooked. Owners may encounter instances where the car’s dashboard illuminates with errors and unavailable features, even on older models. This can frequently be attributed to low battery levels. These vehicles are laden with electronics and often feature two batteries: a main battery and an auxiliary battery (which may be replaced with a supercapacitor). The auxiliary battery allows certain functions to remain active after the main car is turned off and also assists with the use of auto start-stop features. However, the main battery is responsible for engine cranking, particularly significant for diesel engines requiring substantial cranking power during cold starts. Recharging the battery requires a drive of nearly 30 minutes, or thereabouts. If the car is used primarily for short trips within city limits, the battery’s voltage levels may drop quickly.

When the car’s Intelligent Power Management System (IPMS) detects a low battery state, it may prompt a message like “please start engine.” This serves as an indicator to either recharge the battery or embark on a substantial drive. Despite the message, the car will likely start, but ignoring it can result in the IPMS disabling certain less critical functions to conserve power and recharge the battery, potentially causing errors in other systems dependent on the affected components. The presence of these errors is usually temporary and disappears after a restart, provided the battery has been replenished through a proper drive.

These vehicles are not conducive to prolonged periods of inactivity, and batteries tend to last around three years. However, if the car is not driven daily, the battery’s lifespan may be reduced. Prolonged exposure to low voltage levels can also damage batteries, making regular use essential. Short trips are not recommended; the vehicles are best suited for longer drives.

Moreover, there is a noteworthy issue related to the earth strap in the right-hand side wheel arch behind the liner. Over time, corrosion can compromise the earth strap, potentially leading to grounding faults. This could trigger a variety of errors on the dashboard, such as low battery indications, sporadic door lock behavior, or flickering headlights. This corrosion could also contribute to battery drain, as certain circuits may fail to shut down after the engine is turned off and the car is locked. Some reports suggest that parking the car in “Access Mode” might aid the car in entering a sleep state, but this remains a topic of discussion.

Another common concern is related to the EAS (Electronic Air Suspension) system. While this system might be perceived as a potential financial burden due to its complexity compared to coil springs, it aligns perfectly with the Range Rover’s emphasis on comfort and off-road adaptability.

Common issues include dashboard faults displaying “not available.” As mentioned earlier, this often ties back to the battery issue. EAS and Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) are often the first functions to be disabled when the car detects a low battery. A quick test of the EAS system is to observe if the car raises to normal or off-road height within a relatively short duration. If it does, the compressor is likely functioning correctly. The compressor’s location varies, found in the boot of L494 and L405 models, and under the right rear section in L320 models (though it can be more challenging to access). In older models, the compressor is located under the bonnet.

The functioning of the EAS system is relatively straightforward. The compressor draws in air, passes it through a desiccant dryer, and fills a small tank. This tank then supplies air to each corner of the vehicle. As the car’s height is adjusted, the compressor halts and releases pressure from the pipes. Sometimes, a diffuser softens the sound during venting, which can become blocked, leading to improper venting. This could prevent the car from lowering when desired or hinder proper corner leveling by the compressor. Additionally, the air dryer’s desiccant material (silica beads) can deteriorate over time, potentially blocking the valve block that distributes air to each corner. While this might present a more intricate issue to address, it remains manageable.

Leaking air struts are another possible cause for concern, leading to the compressor overworking and generating excess heat. This can exacerbate the aforementioned issues, and it’s essential to address any leaks promptly. To test for leaks, set the car to its highest height and leave it overnight on level ground. Any visible drop in the morning indicates a leak. Placing tape on each wheel arch to measure gaps can help monitor potential leaks. Remember, atmospheric pressure variations and self-leveling mechanisms can influence the vehicle’s height over time, making slight drops normal. If leaks are detected, repairs might be needed.

The compressor replacement process is relatively straightforward for L494 and L405 models, as the compressor is located in the boot. However, de-pressurization is necessary before replacing it. For prospective buyers, this can be a relatively simple and cost-effective task to carry out at home.

Next, let’s delve into the realm of keyless entry systems.

Security concerns have been raised due to instances of vehicle theft, particularly in the UK. Thieves often employ a relay attack method, boosting the communication between the car and the key fob, tricking the car into thinking the key is nearby, thereby gaining access and enabling ignition. To counter this threat, placing the key in a metal box or RFID-proof case can thwart such attacks. Enhanced home security measures, such as bollards, gates, or secure garages, can also serve as effective deterrents against theft attempts.

Transitioning to the interior, unfortunately, the situation doesn’t see a notable improvement.

Range Rover Sports located in hot climates can encounter issues with dashboard cracking, typically concentrated around the area of the passenger airbag.

Additionally, sagging headliners and sagging A-pillar fabric can be problematic. While repairing these issues is not excessively difficult, it’s advisable to consult a skilled upholsterer. On the other hand, replacing the entire dashboard with a new component is a more intricate and expensive endeavor.

However, with the introduction of the 2009 update, the dashboard underwent improvements, resulting in fewer reports of these issues in the updated models.

Another common fault pertains to the air conditioning condenser. If a car has never had a replacement, prospective buyers should be aware that this can be a time-consuming task, often requiring around five hours of labor due to the necessity of disassembling the front of the vehicle.

For those considering a Sport with auto-dip headlights, another prevalent issue involves the lights’ sensor, which is housed in the rearview mirror. Failure of this sensor necessitates the replacement of the entire mirror, a potentially costly endeavor. Moreover, the replacement involves rewiring and coding, which can significantly escalate the expenses.

Incorrect readings of the fuel gauge have been reported, leading to instances where owners unexpectedly run out of fuel, often far from a petrol station.

In pre-facelift models, the soft-touch material on the HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) knobs can deteriorate over time, a phenomenon amusingly referred to as “de-vulcanization.”

The infotainment system and all components powered by electricity, including power windows, seat controls, and even the gear selection knob, are susceptible to electronic issues. While some problems may be resolved with a new battery or a simple software update, certain perplexing electronic glitches can stem from enigmatic water leaks into the interior.

Mechanically, these vehicles have gained notoriety for their mechanical unreliability, making them a choice for those who enjoy troubleshooting or supporting their mechanics’ mortgage payments, kids school tuition and expensive hobbies.

The V6 diesel engine, a Ford creation, is plagued by well-documented issues. Turbos frequently fail, and complications with the EGR valve and high-pressure fuel pump are common. Oil cooler leaks, coolant leaks from water pumps, and thermostat housings are regular concerns. The most significant concern is bottom-end engine failure, encompassing big end and main bearing issues, and even crankshaft breakage.

The V8 diesel fares slightly better, yet it too faces several common problems. While catastrophic bottom-end failures are less frequent, the engine is susceptible to top-end failures due to timing chain issues.

The 4.2 and 4.4 petrol V8 engines share components and issues. A prevailing problem is timing chain tensioner and guide failure, which can lead to valve train and camshaft damage. The supercharger drive coupling is another frequent failure.

The later model 5.0 petrol engines, both naturally aspirated and supercharged versions, unfortunately, don’t exhibit substantial improvement, still encountering timing chain troubles.

Interestingly, the V6 diesel utilizes a timing belt, sparing it from timing chain woes. However, all other engines face timing chain challenges. Addressing these issues before they escalate to engine failure allows for in-situ repairs. However, if these problems necessitate engine removal, it’s crucial to note that lifting the entire body off the chassis is required for access.

The cooling system is another point of concern. Water pump leaks are commonplace, and plastic components like thermostat housings and expansion tanks are prone to splitting and leaking.

Regular servicing is key to mitigating severe internal engine problems. Owners should be cautious not to assume proper servicing simply because they follow the recommended service intervals. Servicing every 26,000km is inadequate; more frequent intervals, around 10,000km, are necessary to maintain engine longevity.

Diesel models feature Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) to adhere to Euro 5 Emissions standards. DPFs collect soot during trips and during Auto Stop Starting, which occurs in urban environments. Adequate DPF regeneration requires consistent driving at high temperatures, allowing the exhaust to burn off accumulated soot. Short trips hinder this regeneration process, potentially leading to clogged DPFs and engine issues.

The failure of force regeneration processes can lead to oil dilution, as unused fuel leaks into the engine. This thins the oil, potentially causing premature wear. Oil dilution could also contribute to the notorious crankshaft issues the 3.0 Diesel engines suffer from.

Crankshaft snapping is a significant concern for the TDV6 and SDV6 engines. Main crankshaft bearing shells can rotate and block oil passages, leading to heating and wear. This culminates in crankshaft fracture, resulting in catastrophic engine failure.

Despite best practices such as fresh oil and careful driving, this issue remains unpredictable. Warranty coverage or dealer assistance can mitigate costs associated with this problem however we have encountered far too many stories of dealerships refusing assistance. The V8 diesel encounters fewer issues of this nature but still faces timing chain concerns if not serviced properly.

In conclusion, the L320 Range Rover Sport presents both challenges and unique features. Addressing known issues through diligent servicing and cautious driving can help owners navigate potential pitfalls and enjoy the benefits these vehicles offer, however, we wonder if all of these potential issues, and the stress they may cause owners are worth it, especially when other, just as capable and far more reliable vehicles are available.

Navigating the world of Range Rovers presents a challenge, notably due to their well-known reliability issues and occasionally less-than-stellar customer service, the latter being the more prominent concern.

The trajectory of Range Rovers, transitioning from the P38 Range Rover and original Discovery, has been characterized by a shift towards a more luxurious off-road experience, establishing a market benchmark that other manufacturers strive to emulate.

Let’s begin by examining the exterior aspects.

When evaluating the exterior condition, it’s important to note that body panels should be free from rust. However, vehicles in colder climates might exhibit rust on the undercarriage. A thorough inspection of the car, especially beneath plastic trim and fender protectors, is recommended.

Electrical components have been known to present issues and failures. These encompass power folding mirrors, parking sensors, door locks, as well as potential head and taillight problems. At times, the root cause can be related to wiring complications. It is advisable to ensure that all electronic features are fully operational before making a purchase.

For vehicles equipped with detachable tow bars, electronic glitches can arise when towing a trailer. Faulty tow bars can lead to rear fog light malfunctions upon detaching the tow bar.

The electric parking brake can pose challenges, and it’s crucial to listen for unusual grinding or other concerning sounds. These could indicate an incorrectly adjusted parking brake. Ignoring these noises could lead to a range of complications, including instances where owners have found themselves stranded due to parking brake issues.

Water leaks are a recurrent issue, with sunroof drains being a common source. Similar to other vehicles, these drains can become clogged. Additionally, there can be complications with the endings of the drain hoses. In cases of clogging, cleaning the drains with compressed air or a thin-edge trimmer line is usually effective. However, there are instances where the rubber endings of these drain holes detach. Located behind plastic side vents on both sides of the car, these rubber endings can deteriorate over time. Consequently, the rubber hose slides inside, causing water from the sunroof to pour into the car’s sides. This can be problematic, considering that the main wiring loom is also located in this vicinity, exposing it to potential water damage. Water and electricity, as we know, do not mix well.

Other concerns include the potential delamination of the rear spoiler and fading finish on the B and C pillars over time. The windshield cowl beneath the windscreen wipers can warp due to aging, leading to compromised sealing against the windshield. This exposes the HVAC inlet to water ingress, a less-than-ideal scenario.

Interestingly, it appears that these issues tend to be more prevalent in pre-update Sports. However, post-update models are not entirely immune to these challenges.

Moving on, one of the most common complaints pertains to the battery and its voracious appetite for electrical power. This is often overlooked. Owners may encounter instances where the car’s dashboard illuminates with errors and unavailable features, even on older models. This can frequently be attributed to low battery levels. These vehicles are laden with electronics and often feature two batteries: a main battery and an auxiliary battery (which may be replaced with a supercapacitor). The auxiliary battery allows certain functions to remain active after the main car is turned off and also assists with the use of auto start-stop features. However, the main battery is responsible for engine cranking, particularly significant for diesel engines requiring substantial cranking power during cold starts. Recharging the battery requires a drive of nearly 30 minutes, or thereabouts. If the car is used primarily for short trips within city limits, the battery’s voltage levels may drop quickly.

When the car’s Intelligent Power Management System (IPMS) detects a low battery state, it may prompt a message like “please start engine.” This serves as an indicator to either recharge the battery or embark on a substantial drive. Despite the message, the car will likely start, but ignoring it can result in the IPMS disabling certain less critical functions to conserve power and recharge the battery, potentially causing errors in other systems dependent on the affected components. The presence of these errors is usually temporary and disappears after a restart, provided the battery has been replenished through a proper drive.

These vehicles are not conducive to prolonged periods of inactivity, and batteries tend to last around three years. However, if the car is not driven daily, the battery’s lifespan may be reduced. Prolonged exposure to low voltage levels can also damage batteries, making regular use essential. Short trips are not recommended; the vehicles are best suited for longer drives.

Moreover, there is a noteworthy issue related to the earth strap in the right-hand side wheel arch behind the liner. Over time, corrosion can compromise the earth strap, potentially leading to grounding faults. This could trigger a variety of errors on the dashboard, such as low battery indications, sporadic door lock behavior, or flickering headlights. This corrosion could also contribute to battery drain, as certain circuits may fail to shut down after the engine is turned off and the car is locked. Some reports suggest that parking the car in “Access Mode” might aid the car in entering a sleep state, but this remains a topic of discussion.

Another common concern is related to the EAS (Electronic Air Suspension) system. While this system might be perceived as a potential financial burden due to its complexity compared to coil springs, it aligns perfectly with the Range Rover’s emphasis on comfort and off-road adaptability.

Common issues include dashboard faults displaying “not available.” As mentioned earlier, this often ties back to the battery issue. EAS and Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) are often the first functions to be disabled when the car detects a low battery. A quick test of the EAS system is to observe if the car raises to normal or off-road height within a relatively short duration. If it does, the compressor is likely functioning correctly. The compressor’s location varies, found in the boot of L494 and L405 models, and under the right rear section in L320 models (though it can be more challenging to access). In older models, the compressor is located under the bonnet.

The functioning of the EAS system is relatively straightforward. The compressor draws in air, passes it through a desiccant dryer, and fills a small tank. This tank then supplies air to each corner of the vehicle. As the car’s height is adjusted, the compressor halts and releases pressure from the pipes. Sometimes, a diffuser softens the sound during venting, which can become blocked, leading to improper venting. This could prevent the car from lowering when desired or hinder proper corner leveling by the compressor. Additionally, the air dryer’s desiccant material (silica beads) can deteriorate over time, potentially blocking the valve block that distributes air to each corner. While this might present a more intricate issue to address, it remains manageable.

Leaking air struts are another possible cause for concern, leading to the compressor overworking and generating excess heat. This can exacerbate the aforementioned issues, and it’s essential to address any leaks promptly. To test for leaks, set the car to its highest height and leave it overnight on level ground. Any visible drop in the morning indicates a leak. Placing tape on each wheel arch to measure gaps can help monitor potential leaks. Remember, atmospheric pressure variations and self-leveling mechanisms can influence the vehicle’s height over time, making slight drops normal. If leaks are detected, repairs might be needed.

The compressor replacement process is relatively straightforward for L494 and L405 models, as the compressor is located in the boot. However, de-pressurization is necessary before replacing it. For prospective buyers, this can be a relatively simple and cost-effective task to carry out at home.

Next, let’s delve into the realm of keyless entry systems.

Security concerns have been raised due to instances of vehicle theft, particularly in the UK. Thieves often employ a relay attack method, boosting the communication between the car and the key fob, tricking the car into thinking the key is nearby, thereby gaining access and enabling ignition. To counter this threat, placing the key in a metal box or RFID-proof case can thwart such attacks. Enhanced home security measures, such as bollards, gates, or secure garages, can also serve as effective deterrents against theft attempts.

Transitioning to the interior, unfortunately, the situation doesn’t see a notable improvement.

Range Rover Sports located in hot climates can encounter issues with dashboard cracking, typically concentrated around the area of the passenger airbag.

Additionally, sagging headliners and sagging A-pillar fabric can be problematic. While repairing these issues is not excessively difficult, it’s advisable to consult a skilled upholsterer. On the other hand, replacing the entire dashboard with a new component is a more intricate and expensive endeavor.

However, with the introduction of the 2009 update, the dashboard underwent improvements, resulting in fewer reports of these issues in the updated models.

Another common fault pertains to the air conditioning condenser. If a car has never had a replacement, prospective buyers should be aware that this can be a time-consuming task, often requiring around five hours of labor due to the necessity of disassembling the front of the vehicle.

For those considering a Sport with auto-dip headlights, another prevalent issue involves the lights’ sensor, which is housed in the rearview mirror. Failure of this sensor necessitates the replacement of the entire mirror, a potentially costly endeavor. Moreover, the replacement involves rewiring and coding, which can significantly escalate the expenses.

Incorrect readings of the fuel gauge have been reported, leading to instances where owners unexpectedly run out of fuel, often far from a petrol station.

In pre-facelift models, the soft-touch material on the HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) knobs can deteriorate over time, a phenomenon amusingly referred to as “de-vulcanization.”

The infotainment system and all components powered by electricity, including power windows, seat controls, and even the gear selection knob, are susceptible to electronic issues. While some problems may be resolved with a new battery or a simple software update, certain perplexing electronic glitches can stem from enigmatic water leaks into the interior.

Mechanically, these vehicles have gained notoriety for their mechanical unreliability, making them a choice for those who enjoy troubleshooting or supporting their mechanics’ mortgage payments, kids school tuition and expensive hobbies.

The V6 diesel engine, a Ford creation, is plagued by well-documented issues. Turbos frequently fail, and complications with the EGR valve and high-pressure fuel pump are common. Oil cooler leaks, coolant leaks from water pumps, and thermostat housings are regular concerns. The most significant concern is bottom-end engine failure, encompassing big end and main bearing issues, and even crankshaft breakage.

The V8 diesel fares slightly better, yet it too faces several common problems. While catastrophic bottom-end failures are less frequent, the engine is susceptible to top-end failures due to timing chain issues.

The 4.2 and 4.4 petrol V8 engines share components and issues. A prevailing problem is timing chain tensioner and guide failure, which can lead to valve train and camshaft damage. The supercharger drive coupling is another frequent failure.

The later model 5.0 petrol engines, both naturally aspirated and supercharged versions, unfortunately, don’t exhibit substantial improvement, still encountering timing chain troubles.

Interestingly, the V6 diesel utilizes a timing belt, sparing it from timing chain woes. However, all other engines face timing chain challenges. Addressing these issues before they escalate to engine failure allows for in-situ repairs. However, if these problems necessitate engine removal, it’s crucial to note that lifting the entire body off the chassis is required for access.

The cooling system is another point of concern. Water pump leaks are commonplace, and plastic components like thermostat housings and expansion tanks are prone to splitting and leaking.

Regular servicing is key to mitigating severe internal engine problems. Owners should be cautious not to assume proper servicing simply because they follow the recommended service intervals. Servicing every 26,000km is inadequate; more frequent intervals, around 10,000km, are necessary to maintain engine longevity.

Diesel models feature Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) to adhere to Euro 5 Emissions standards. DPFs collect soot during trips and during Auto Stop Starting, which occurs in urban environments. Adequate DPF regeneration requires consistent driving at high temperatures, allowing the exhaust to burn off accumulated soot. Short trips hinder this regeneration process, potentially leading to clogged DPFs and engine issues.

The failure of force regeneration processes can lead to oil dilution, as unused fuel leaks into the engine. This thins the oil, potentially causing premature wear. Oil dilution could also contribute to the notorious crankshaft issues the 3.0 Diesel engines suffer from.

Crankshaft snapping is a significant concern for the TDV6 and SDV6 engines. Main crankshaft bearing shells can rotate and block oil passages, leading to heating and wear. This culminates in crankshaft fracture, resulting in catastrophic engine failure.

Despite best practices such as fresh oil and careful driving, this issue remains unpredictable. Warranty coverage or dealer assistance can mitigate costs associated with this problem however we have encountered far too many stories of dealerships refusing assistance. The V8 diesel encounters fewer issues of this nature but still faces timing chain concerns if not serviced properly.

In conclusion, the L320 Range Rover Sport presents both challenges and unique features. Addressing known issues through diligent servicing and cautious driving can help owners navigate potential pitfalls and enjoy the benefits these vehicles offer, however, we wonder if all of these potential issues, and the stress they may cause owners are worth it, especially when other, just as capable and far more reliable vehicles are available.

Body Styles

5-door SUV

Engines

2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
5.0 litre V8 petrol (V8, V8 Luxury, HSE Luxury Black)
5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged Autobiography, Super Charged Platinum)

Power

140kW – 2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
220kW – 4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
287kW – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
200kW – 3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
180kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
276kW – 5.0 litre V8 petrol (V8, V8 Luxury, HSE Luxury Black)
375kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged Autobiography, Super Charged Platinum)

Torque

440Nm – 2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
425Nm – 4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
550Nm – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
640Nm – 3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
600Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
510Nm – 5.0 litre V8 petrol

Body Styles

5-door SUV

Engines

2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
5.0 litre V8 petrol (V8, V8 Luxury, HSE Luxury Black)
5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged Autobiography, Super Charged Platinum)

Power

140kW – 2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
220kW – 4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
287kW – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
200kW – 3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
180kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
276kW – 5.0 litre V8 petrol (V8, V8 Luxury, HSE Luxury Black)
375kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged Autobiography, Super Charged Platinum)

Torque

440Nm – 2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
425Nm – 4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
550Nm – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
640Nm – 3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
600Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
510Nm – 5.0 litre V8 petrol (V8, V8 Luxury, HSE Luxury Black)
625Nm – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged Autobiography, Super Charged Platinum)

Transmissions

6-speed sports automatic

Fuel Consumption

9.2 – 15.9L / 100km

Length

4783 – 4798mm

Width

1928 – 2004mm

Height

1784 – 1789mm

Kerb Weight

2455 – 2676kg

Towing

750kg (unbraked), 3500kg (braked)

Body Styles

5-door SUV

Engines

2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
5.0 litre V8 petrol (V8, V8 Luxury, HSE Luxury Black)
5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged Autobiography, Super Charged Platinum)

Power

140kW – 2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
220kW – 4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
287kW – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
200kW – 3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
180kW – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
276kW – 5.0 litre V8 petrol (V8, V8 Luxury, HSE Luxury Black)
375kW – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged Autobiography, Super Charged Platinum)

Torque

440Nm – 2.7 litre V6 turbocharged diesel (TDV6)
425Nm – 4.4 litre V8 petrol (V8)
550Nm – 4.2 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged First Edition)
640Nm – 3.6 litre V8 turbo diesel (TDV8, TDV8 Luxury)
600Nm – 3.0 litre V6 turbo diesel (TDV6, TDV6 Luxury, TDV6 Autobiography, SDV6, SDV6 Luxury, SDV6 Autobiography, SDV6 Silver, HSE Luxury Black)
510Nm – 5.0 litre V8 petrol (V8, V8 Luxury, HSE Luxury Black)
625Nm – 5.0 litre supercharged V8 petrol (Super Charged, Super Charged Autobiography, Super Charged Platinum)

Transmissions

6-speed sports automatic

Fuel Consumption

9.2 – 15.9L / 100km

Length

4783 – 4798mm

Width

1928 – 2004mm

Height

1784 – 1789mm

Kerb Weight

2455 – 2676kg

Towing

750kg (unbraked), 3500kg (braked)

Warranty

3 years / 100,000 km

Service Intervals

12 months or 10,000km

Model range, pricing & features

Range Rover Sport-4

TDV6

Price when new: $85,000 - $99,900

Price used: $7,100 - $25,300

Standard Features:

18″ Alloy Wheels
8 Speaker Stereo
ABS (Antilock Brakes)
Air Cond. – Climate Control
Airbag – Driver
Airbag – Passenger
Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
Airbags – Head for 2nd Row Seats
Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
Alarm
Armrest – Rear Centre (Shared)
Brake Assist
CD Player
Cargo Blind – Rear
Control – Electronic Stability
Control – Hill Descent
Control – Rollover Stability
Control – Traction
Courtesy Lamps – in Doors Front
Courtesy Lamps – in Doors Rear
Cruise Control
Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
Disc Brakes Rear Ventilated
Electric Seat – Drivers
Electric Seat – Passenger
Engine Immobiliser
Fog Lamps – Front
Headlamp Washers
Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
Illuminated Vanity Mirror for Front Passenger
Leather Gear Knob
Leather Seats
Leather Steering Wheel
Metallic Finish Door Handles – Exterior
Metallic Finish Door Handles – Interior
Metallic Finish Instrument Surrounds
Park Brake – Electric
Power Door Mirrors – Heated
Power Steering – Speed Sensitive
Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
Rear View Mirror – Electric Anti Glare
Seat – Drivers Lumbar Adjustment Manual
Seat – Passenger Lumbar Adjustment Manual
Seats – 2nd Row Split Fold
Spoiler – Rear Roof Mounted
Sunvisor – Illuminated Vanity Mirror for Driver
Suspension – Air Electronic
Tailgate with Opening Window
Trip Computer
Vented – Guards Front

MY09 update:

Body Colour – Rear Garnish
Clear Side Indicator Lenses

MY10 update:

12V Socket(s) – Auxiliary
19″ Alloy Wheels
Air Conditioning – Dual
Amplifier – 1 Separate
Armrest – Drivers Seat (Individual)
Armrest – Passengers Seat (Individual)
Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
Audio – Input for iPod
Audio – MP3 Decoder
Bluetooth System
Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Partial
Central Locking – Once Mobile
Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
Centre Differential – Active
Centre Differential – Selectable
Control – Park Distance Rear
Control – Trailer Sway
Drive-by-Wire (ETC) – Selectable Multi Mode
EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
Footwell Lamps – Front
Headlamps – Bi-Xenon (for low & high beam)
Headlamps – Corner (Fixed)
Headlamps – LED
Hill Holder
Inbuilt Harddisk Drive
Laminated Windscreen
Multi-function Steering Wheel
Navigation System – Advanced Functionality
Power Boot Closing Aid
Power Door Mirrors – Anti Glare
Power Windows – Front & Rear
Starter Button – Key/Fob Proximity
Subwoofer
Tail Lamps – LED
Voice Recognition
Woodgrain – Centre Console
Woodgrain – Inserts in Door

SDV6

Price when new: $100,045 - $100,900

Price used: $19,200 - $32,700

In addition to TDV6

11 Speaker Stereo
Air Cond. – Climate Control 2 Zone
Alarm with Motion Sensor
Ambient Lighting – Interior
Audio – Aux Input Socket (MP3/CD/Cassette)
Body Colour – Door Handles
Camera – Rear Vision
Centre Differential
Cup Holders – 1st Row
Cup Holders – 2nd Row
Electric Seats – 1st Row (Front)
Electronic Differential Lock
Floor Mats
GPS (Satellite Navigation)
Headlamps – Xenon (Low beam only)
Laminated Side Windows
Lighting – Exterior Side
Map/Reading Lamps – for 1st Row
Multi-function Control Screen – Colour
Navigation System – DVD Audio
On-board Computer
Remote Boot/Hatch Release
Spare Wheel – Space Saver/Temporary
Storage Compartment – Centre Console 1st Row
Sunvisor – Illuminated Vanity Mirrors Dual
Suspension – Auto Levelling

MY12 update:

Navigation System – DVD Video

V8

Price when new: $101,000 - $125,900

Price used: $7,000 - $23,100

In addition to SDV6

CD Stacker – 6 disc In Dash/Cabin
Premium Sound System

SDV6 Silver

Price when new: $104,545 - $104,545

Price used: $24,500 - $34,600

In addition to SDV6:

20″ Alloy Wheels
Adjustable Steering Column – Power & Memory
Electric Seat – Drivers with Memory
Gear Shift Paddles behind Steering Wheel
Paint – Metallic
Power – Boot/Tailgate
Power Door Mirrors – with Memory
Rear Windows – Extra Dark/Privacy
Woodgrain – Inserts Premium

TDV8

Price when new: $107,900 - $120,500

Price used: $10,700 - $26,300

Same equipment as V8

TDV6 Luxury

Price when new: $112,900 - $112,900

Price used: $17,700 - $28,000

In addition to TDV6:

Control – Park Distance Front
Headlamp – High Beam Auto Dipping
Metallic Finish Front Grille
Power Door Mirrors – Folding
TV Tuner – Analogue
TV Tuner – Digital

SDV6 Luxury

Price when new: $113,045 - $113,900

Price used: $21,300 - $37,000

In addition to SDV6

Adjustable Steering Col. – Easy Entry/Exit
Central Locking – Key Proximity
Chrome Grille
Leather – Armrest Front
Leather Seats – Perforated
Leather Trimmed – (Whole) Dash Cover
Scuff Plates (on door sills)
Seat – Bolsters Adjustable for Driver
Seat – Driver with Electric Lumbar

MY12 update:

Seat – Bolsters Adjustable for Front Passenger

HSE Luxury Black

Price when new: $117,545 - $143,545

Price used: $27,800 - $44,000

In addition to V6 models:

Centre Console – Cool Box
Colour Display Screen – Front Twin View L & R
Gloss Finish Inserts
Heated Seats – 1st Row
Heated Seats – 2nd Row
Seat – Ventilated Drivers Side
Seat – Ventilated Passenger Side

TDV6 AutobiographySDV6 Autobiography

Price when new: $121,300 - $121,300

Price used: $19,500 - $30,000

In addition to TDV6 Luxury:

13 Speaker Stereo
Control – Electronic Damper
Digital Sound Processing
Headlamps – Active (Cornering/steering)
Stabiliser – Front Electronically Disable
Stabiliser – Rear Electronically Disable

SDV6 Autobiography

Price when new: $128,045 - $128,900

Price used: $24,600 - $41,200

In addition to SDV6 Luxury:

17 Speaker Stereo
Floor Mats – Custom
Headphones – Front Passenger Wireless
Heated Front Windscreen
Heated Washer Jets
Steering Wheel – Heated

TDV8 Luxury

Price when new: $135,500 - $135,500

Price used: $19,400 - $29,300

In addition to TDV8:

Power Steering – Active (Ratio Speed related)

Super Charged

Price when new: $136,500 - $161,400

Price used: $8,900 - $48,400

In addition to TDV8 Luxury:

Calipers – Front 4 Spot
Calipers – Painted Front
Control – Active Yaw
Exhaust – Stainless Steel Dual System
Headlamps – Blacked Out Surrounds
Headlamps – Clear Lenses
Suspension – Active Ride (leans into corners)
MY08 update
Adjustable Steering Column – Power

MY10 update:

Calipers – Front 6 Spot
Calipers – Rear 2 Spot
Chrome Exhaust Tip(s)
Illuminated (puddle lamps) Door Mirrors

MY13 update:

Calipers – Painted Rear
Performance Brakes

V8 Luxury

Price when new: $138,900 - $139,900

Price used: $16,600 - $42,300

Same equipment as TDV8 Luxury

Super Charged First Edition

Price when new: $150,000

Price used: $10,200 - $16,800

In addition to Super Charged:

Headphones – Rear Passengers plug ins
Paint – Custom

Super Charged Platinum

Price when new: $165,145

Price used: $37,000 - $50,100

In addition to the Super Charged:

Carbon Fibre – Interior Inserts

Super Charged Autobiography

Price when new: $168,300 - $175,900

Price used: $24,000 - $52,700

Same equipment as the Super Charged

While there are instances of Range Rover Sports that have remained unscathed by the commonly reported issues, it’s essential to acknowledge that the problems we’ve discussed represent the more prevalent faults. However, the list of less frequent yet still impactful issues affecting thousands of vehicles is alarmingly extensive. The consistent disappointment in reliability and customer satisfaction surveys from Range Rover and Land Rover is not surprising given our research findings.

Despite all that, when you overlook these concerns, the Range Rover Sport can be an undeniably splendid SUV.

The question of whether you should buy one hinges on your financial circumstances, your level of vehicular loyalty, and your tolerance for frustration.

Regardless of the Range Rover Sport model you’re considering or its price tag, having an extra $15,000 set aside for potential issues would be wise.

Hopefully, you won’t need to dip into the “Range Rover Sport has had another tantrum” fund, but having this financial cushion can mitigate the blow of unfortunate news.

However, if you lack the availability of such funds or if your patience for recurring problems is not a personal virtue, then absolutely, under no circumstances should you invest in a Range Rover Sport.

When these vehicles have been meticulously maintained, they can indeed transform into exceptional used SUVs. Yet, skip a service or two, or compromise on maintenance, and the consequences can be nightmarish.

In any case, regardless of your financial standing, unless you possess a penchant for enduring unnecessary hardships, we emphatically urge you:

While there are instances of Range Rover Sports that have remained unscathed by the commonly reported issues, it’s essential to acknowledge that the problems we’ve discussed represent the more prevalent faults. However, the list of less frequent yet still impactful issues affecting thousands of vehicles is alarmingly extensive. The consistent disappointment in reliability and customer satisfaction surveys from Range Rover and Land Rover is not surprising given our research findings.

Despite all that, when you overlook these concerns, the Range Rover Sport can be an undeniably splendid SUV.

The question of whether you should buy one hinges on your financial circumstances, your level of vehicular loyalty, and your tolerance for frustration.

Regardless of the Range Rover Sport model you’re considering or its price tag, having an extra $15,000 set aside for potential issues would be wise.

Hopefully, you won’t need to dip into the “Range Rover Sport has had another tantrum” fund, but having this financial cushion can mitigate the blow of unfortunate news.

However, if you lack the availability of such funds or if your patience for recurring problems is not a personal virtue, then absolutely, under no circumstances should you invest in a Range Rover Sport.

When these vehicles have been meticulously maintained, they can indeed transform into exceptional used SUVs. Yet, skip a service or two, or compromise on maintenance, and the consequences can be nightmarish.

In any case, regardless of your financial standing, unless you possess a penchant for enduring unnecessary hardships, we emphatically urge you: DO NOT acquire any Range Rover Sport without complete service records, or with any doubts about its history, or with even the faintest signs of abuse, neglect, or irregular care and maintenance.

While the allure of a low price may be strong, the likelihood of future substantial expenses is extremely high.

It cannot be stressed enough, there do exist those rare instances where no issues have surfaced. If you can confirm that the previous owner has maintained it as diligently as possible and your financial situation is robust, then you might cautiously consider it.

While there are instances of Range Rover Sports that have remained unscathed by the commonly reported issues, it’s essential to acknowledge that the problems we’ve discussed represent the more prevalent faults. However, the list of less frequent yet still impactful issues affecting thousands of vehicles is alarmingly extensive. The consistent disappointment in reliability and customer satisfaction surveys from Range Rover and Land Rover is not surprising given our research findings.

Despite all that, when you overlook these concerns, the Range Rover Sport can be an undeniably splendid SUV.

The question of whether you should buy one hinges on your financial circumstances, your level of vehicular loyalty, and your tolerance for frustration.

Regardless of the Range Rover Sport model you’re considering or its price tag, having an extra $15,000 set aside for potential issues would be wise.

Hopefully, you won’t need to dip into the “Range Rover Sport has had another tantrum” fund, but having this financial cushion can mitigate the blow of unfortunate news.

However, if you lack the availability of such funds or if your patience for recurring problems is not a personal virtue, then absolutely, under no circumstances should you invest in a Range Rover Sport.

When these vehicles have been meticulously maintained, they can indeed transform into exceptional used SUVs. Yet, skip a service or two, or compromise on maintenance, and the consequences can be nightmarish.

In any case, regardless of your financial standing, unless you possess a penchant for enduring unnecessary hardships, we emphatically urge you: DO NOT acquire any Range Rover Sport without complete service records, or with any doubts about its history, or with even the faintest signs of abuse, neglect, or irregular care and maintenance.

While the allure of a low price may be strong, the likelihood of future substantial expenses is extremely high.

It cannot be stressed enough, there do exist those rare instances where no issues have surfaced. If you can confirm that the previous owner has maintained it as diligently as possible and your financial situation is robust, then you might cautiously consider it.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of August 10, 2023

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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