Pros

  • A critically acclaimed and celebrated hot hatch.
  • Incredible value for money.
  • Stunning looks, immense performance and decent practicality.
  • Excellent fanbase and support network of owners and experts.

Cons

  • Can suffer from a wide range of issues and problems.
  • Parts and labour can ask a premium.
  • Many examples have been mistreated and possibly abused.
  • Requires regular attention and maintenance.

Verdict

Rather than asking yourself if you should buy a Renault Megane RS, maybe the more important question is, am I willing to enter a relationship with a Renault Megane RS.

If you are simply in the market for just a car, we’re sorry but as brilliant as the Megane RS...

While Renault have been producing critically acclaimed hot hatches since the late 1970’s, this cheat sheet is focussing purely on the 3rd generation Renault Megane based RS models.

Exclusively available as a 3-door hatch (or coupe) body style, these RS models were manufactured from 2010 to 2016, featured a 2.0-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder engine powering the front wheels all via a 6-speed manual transmission.

During this production period the Megane did receive a couple of updates, firstly in 2012 then again in 2014, both featuring the usual spread of tech and equipment updates, some mechanical revisions but most obviously with the second update, a substantial facelift,

In the same way that it’s often immensely frustrating trying to decipher and choose between the vast range of different French wines and cheeses, all being incredibly similar yet substantially different, the same can be said for trying to make sense of the various Megane RS models.

Here in Australia, we’ve had no less than 17 different trim specs across this generation. From the early base spec RS 250 Cup, to the higher spec and more potent RS 265 Trophy, all the way through to the stripped out, ultra focussed track destroying RS 275 Trophy R.

In an attempt to make sense of the confusion, firstly the three different number identities represent the engines power, 250 equating to 250 PS (247 bhp or 184 kW), 265 equating to, 265PS (261 bhp or 195 kW) and yep you guessed it, 275 representing 275 PS (271 bhp

While Renault have been producing critically acclaimed hot hatches since the late 1970’s, this cheat sheet is focussing purely on the 3rd generation Renault Megane based RS models.

Exclusively available as a 3-door hatch (or coupe) body style, these RS models were manufactured from 2010 to 2016, featured a 2.0-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder engine powering the front wheels all via a 6-speed manual transmission.

During this production period the Megane did receive a couple of updates, firstly in 2012 then again in 2014, both featuring the usual spread of tech and equipment updates, some mechanical revisions but most obviously with the second update, a substantial facelift,

In the same way that it’s often immensely frustrating trying to decipher and choose between the vast range of different French wines and cheeses, all being incredibly similar yet substantially different, the same can be said for trying to make sense of the various Megane RS models.

Here in Australia, we’ve had no less than 17 different trim specs across this generation. From the early base spec RS 250 Cup, to the higher spec and more potent RS 265 Trophy, all the way through to the stripped out, ultra focussed track destroying RS 275 Trophy R.

In an attempt to make sense of the confusion, firstly the three different number identities represent the engines power, 250 equating to 250 PS (247 bhp or 184 kW), 265 equating to, 265PS (261 bhp or 195 kW) and yep you guessed it, 275 representing 275 PS (271 bhp or 201 kW).

In addition you have the Cup models and their variants and the Trophy models and their variants.

The Cup is the base spec and the Trophy receives more bells and whistles, although in saying that, and depending on which example you’re looking at, this can vary within itself.

You then have the range of limited edition variants which are sometimes purely aesthetic enhancements, other times not and we highly recommend looking through the model breakdown below to decipher the confusion.

While Renault have been producing critically acclaimed hot hatches since the late 1970’s, this cheat sheet is focussing purely on the 3rd generation Renault Megane based RS models.

Exclusively available as a 3-door hatch (or coupe) body style, these RS models were manufactured from 2010 to 2016, featured a 2.0-litre turbocharged 4-cylinder engine powering the front wheels all via a 6-speed manual transmission.

During this production period the Megane did receive a couple of updates, firstly in 2012 then again in 2014, both featuring the usual spread of tech and equipment updates, some mechanical revisions but most obviously with the second update, a substantial facelift,

In the same way that it’s often immensely frustrating trying to decipher and choose between the vast range of different French wines and cheeses, all being incredibly similar yet substantially different, the same can be said for trying to make sense of the various Megane RS models.

Here in Australia, we’ve had no less than 17 different trim specs across this generation. From the early base spec RS 250 Cup, to the higher spec and more potent RS 265 Trophy, all the way through to the stripped out, ultra focussed track destroying RS 275 Trophy R.

In an attempt to make sense of the confusion, firstly the three different number identities represent the engines power, 250 equating to 250 PS (247 bhp or 184 kW), 265 equating to, 265PS (261 bhp or 195 kW) and yep you guessed it, 275 representing 275 PS (271 bhp or 201 kW).

In addition you have the Cup models and their variants and the Trophy models and their variants.

The Cup is the base spec and the Trophy receives more bells and whistles, although in saying that, and depending on which example you’re looking at, this can vary within itself.

You then have the range of limited edition variants which are sometimes purely aesthetic enhancements, other times not and we highly recommend looking through the model breakdown below to decipher the confusion.

Exterior:

Owners have reported that anything that has electricity running to it, can have dramas. Specifically door lock actuators and rear parking sensors are known to suffer failures.

The pumped rear guards are susceptible to stone chips which can lead to superficial corrosion if not sorted.

Being an affordable performance car, it is critical to inspect for accident damage and dodgy repair work.

Interior:

Many owners have complained that the door handles can simply fail. The potentially larger problem is, replacing the handles with OEM parts will be very expensive as it often requires all new door cards. There are cheaper non OEM alternatives although, we’d be cautious cutting corners in regards to a Megane RS?

The Recaro seats side bolsters are very susceptible to damage and having them repaired or restored often won’t be cheap.

Make sure to check that every button works as there are many reports of various electronic gremlins.

For example there are reports that the cruise control works only sporadically, sensors can fail and can cost well over $1000 to fix and there are plenty of reports of quotes asking over $2500 to fix failed air conditioning compressors which again, is apparently a common fault.

The speakers on lower spec models not only sound average, they apparently don’t last long if you enjoy your tunes at anything above whisper volume plus, plus being French, the sizes are odd and that limits what speakers you can replace them with.

Plenty of owners have complained about infotainment

Exterior:

Owners have reported that anything that has electricity running to it, can have dramas. Specifically door lock actuators and rear parking sensors are known to suffer failures.

The pumped rear guards are susceptible to stone chips which can lead to superficial corrosion if not sorted.

Being an affordable performance car, it is critical to inspect for accident damage and dodgy repair work.

Interior:

Many owners have complained that the door handles can simply fail. The potentially larger problem is, replacing the handles with OEM parts will be very expensive as it often requires all new door cards. There are cheaper non OEM alternatives although, we’d be cautious cutting corners in regards to a Megane RS?

The Recaro seats side bolsters are very susceptible to damage and having them repaired or restored often won’t be cheap.

Make sure to check that every button works as there are many reports of various electronic gremlins.

For example there are reports that the cruise control works only sporadically, sensors can fail and can cost well over $1000 to fix and there are plenty of reports of quotes asking over $2500 to fix failed air conditioning compressors which again, is apparently a common fault.

The speakers on lower spec models not only sound average, they apparently don’t last long if you enjoy your tunes at anything above whisper volume plus, plus being French, the sizes are odd and that limits what speakers you can replace them with.

Plenty of owners have complained about infotainment systems glitching out, not sending signal to certain speakers and just being rubbish to use.

Also, if not cared for, the carpet can become quite shabby very quickly.

Mechanically:

While the Megane RS has developed quite a negative reputation surrounding mechanical reliability online, in terms of the ordinary problems such as brittle engine bay plastics, cooling system complications, computer and electrical issues, it’s important to know, they are really no worse than any other European car of its age and value.

Maintenance wise, it is critical the timing belt is changed every 90,000km or every 4 years (many owners seem to miss this), and while the timing belt is being changed, changing the cam and crank oil seals are recommended.

The harmonic balancer (crank pulley) is prone to failure as well so it is a good idea to change that at the same time.

Clutch hydraulics are a common problem. More accurately, leaking clutch hydraulic dampener and slave cylinders are common as are clutch plate and dual mass flywheel issues.

On that dual mass flywheel, a single mass flywheel conversion is a good idea and can often be cheaper in the long run.

Engine mounts are known to fail prematurely, especially if the car is being driven enthusiastically.

The front upper and lower ball joints wear prematurely which are expensive when repaired with genuine parts however the ball joints can be renewed separately without replacing the entire upright and control arm plus there are plenty of aftermarket options available.

Transmission bearings can wear prematurely (even when well serviced), which usually requires a complete transmission overhaul.

It is important to know, the Megane RS in every form is a very popular track day car so make sure that all modifications (especially engine tuning) are done properly and with the highest quality components.

Recalls:

  • October 2019 – The Renault MEGANE (2018-2019) has a defect where the oil pressure solenoid valve wiring was not manufactured to the required specifications, leading to potential engine failure, posing hazards such as heavier steering, loss of auxiliaries, and increased braking effort, thereby increasing the risk of accidents and injuries to vehicle occupants and other road users (580 affected units).
  • October 2020 – Renault issued a recall for 824 units of the MEGANE IV (2016-2017) due to an error in the owner’s manual wording, potentially leading to incorrect operation of child safety features on the rear doors, increasing the risk of injury or death to vehicle occupants.

Exterior:

Owners have reported that anything that has electricity running to it, can have dramas. Specifically door lock actuators and rear parking sensors are known to suffer failures.

The pumped rear guards are susceptible to stone chips which can lead to superficial corrosion if not sorted.

Being an affordable performance car, it is critical to inspect for accident damage and dodgy repair work.

Interior:

Many owners have complained that the door handles can simply fail. The potentially larger problem is, replacing the handles with OEM parts will be very expensive as it often requires all new door cards. There are cheaper non OEM alternatives although, we’d be cautious cutting corners in regards to a Megane RS?

The Recaro seats side bolsters are very susceptible to damage and having them repaired or restored often won’t be cheap.

Make sure to check that every button works as there are many reports of various electronic gremlins.

For example there are reports that the cruise control works only sporadically, sensors can fail and can cost well over $1000 to fix and there are plenty of reports of quotes asking over $2500 to fix failed air conditioning compressors which again, is apparently a common fault.

The speakers on lower spec models not only sound average, they apparently don’t last long if you enjoy your tunes at anything above whisper volume plus, plus being French, the sizes are odd and that limits what speakers you can replace them with.

Plenty of owners have complained about infotainment systems glitching out, not sending signal to certain speakers and just being rubbish to use.

Also, if not cared for, the carpet can become quite shabby very quickly.

Mechanically:

While the Megane RS has developed quite a negative reputation surrounding mechanical reliability online, in terms of the ordinary problems such as brittle engine bay plastics, cooling system complications, computer and electrical issues, it’s important to know, they are really no worse than any other European car of its age and value.

Maintenance wise, it is critical the timing belt is changed every 90,000km or every 4 years (many owners seem to miss this), and while the timing belt is being changed, changing the cam and crank oil seals are recommended.

The harmonic balancer (crank pulley) is prone to failure as well so it is a good idea to change that at the same time.

Clutch hydraulics are a common problem. More accurately, leaking clutch hydraulic dampener and slave cylinders are common as are clutch plate and dual mass flywheel issues.

On that dual mass flywheel, a single mass flywheel conversion is a good idea and can often be cheaper in the long run.

Engine mounts are known to fail prematurely, especially if the car is being driven enthusiastically.

The front upper and lower ball joints wear prematurely which are expensive when repaired with genuine parts however the ball joints can be renewed separately without replacing the entire upright and control arm plus there are plenty of aftermarket options available.

Transmission bearings can wear prematurely (even when well serviced), which usually requires a complete transmission overhaul.

It is important to know, the Megane RS in every form is a very popular track day car so make sure that all modifications (especially engine tuning) are done properly and with the highest quality components.

Recalls:

  • October 2019 – The Renault MEGANE (2018-2019) has a defect where the oil pressure solenoid valve wiring was not manufactured to the required specifications, leading to potential engine failure, posing hazards such as heavier steering, loss of auxiliaries, and increased braking effort, thereby increasing the risk of accidents and injuries to vehicle occupants and other road users (580 affected units).
  • October 2020 – Renault issued a recall for 824 units of the MEGANE IV (2016-2017) due to an error in the owner’s manual wording, potentially leading to incorrect operation of child safety features on the rear doors, increasing the risk of injury or death to vehicle occupants.

Body Style:

3-door hatchback

Engines:

2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol

Power:

184kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Cup, Cup Trophee, Monaco GP, Australian GP)
195kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Sport Limited, RS 265 Cup, RS 265 Cup+, RS 265 Cup Premium, Trophy, Trophy+, Red Bull, Trophy 8:08 Red Bull, Red Bull Racing RB8)
202kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (RS 275 Cup Premium, RS 275 Trophy, Trophy-R

Torque:

340Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Cup, Cup Trophee, Monaco GP, Australian GP)
360Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Sport Limited, RS 265 Cup, RS 265 Cup Premium, RS 275 Cup Premium, Trophy, RS 275 Trophy, Trophy+, Red Bull, Trophy 8:08 Red Bull, Red Bull Racing RB8, Trophy-R)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed manual, front-wheel drive (FWD)

Fuel Consumption:

7.5 – 8.7L/100km

Length:

4299-4320mm

Width:

1848mm

Height:

1422-1435mm

Kerb Weight:

1284-1411kg

Body Style:

3-door hatchback

Engines:

2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol

Power:

184kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Cup, Cup Trophee, Monaco GP, Australian GP)
195kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Sport Limited, RS 265 Cup, RS 265 Cup+, RS 265 Cup Premium, Trophy, Trophy+, Red Bull, Trophy 8:08 Red Bull, Red Bull Racing RB8)
202kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (RS 275 Cup Premium, RS 275 Trophy, Trophy-R

Torque:

340Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Cup, Cup Trophee, Monaco GP, Australian GP)
360Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Sport Limited, RS 265 Cup, RS 265 Cup Premium, RS 275 Cup Premium, Trophy, RS 275 Trophy, Trophy+, Red Bull, Trophy 8:08 Red Bull, Red Bull Racing RB8, Trophy-R)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed manual, front-wheel drive (FWD)

Fuel Consumption:

7.5 – 8.7L/100km

Length:

4299-4320mm

Width:

1848mm

Height:

1422-1435mm

Kerb Weight:

1284-1411kg

Body Style:

3-door hatchback

Engines:

2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol

Power:

184kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Cup, Cup Trophee, Monaco GP, Australian GP)
195kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Sport Limited, RS 265 Cup, RS 265 Cup+, RS 265 Cup Premium, Trophy, Trophy+, Red Bull, Trophy 8:08 Red Bull, Red Bull Racing RB8)
202kW – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (RS 275 Cup Premium, RS 275 Trophy, Trophy-R

Torque:

340Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Cup, Cup Trophee, Monaco GP, Australian GP)
360Nm – 2.0 litre 4-cylinder turbo petrol (Sport Limited, RS 265 Cup, RS 265 Cup Premium, RS 275 Cup Premium, Trophy, RS 275 Trophy, Trophy+, Red Bull, Trophy 8:08 Red Bull, Red Bull Racing RB8, Trophy-R)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed manual, front-wheel drive (FWD)

Fuel Consumption:

7.5 – 8.7L/100km

Length:

4299-4320mm

Width:

1848mm

Height:

1422-1435mm

Kerb Weight:

1284-1411kg

Warranty:

3 years/unlimited kms
5 years/unlimited kms (from 2014)

Servicing:

12 months/10,000kms

Model range, pricing & features

Renault Megane RS-10

Cup (2010-2016)

Price when new: $41,990 - $44,990

Price used: $6,000 - $21,150

Standard Features:

18-inch alloy wheels
Body coloured bumper bars
Body coloured side mirrors
Front spoiler
Rear privacy glass
Sports suspension
Limited slip differential
Driver and front passenger airbags
Front side airbags
Full-length curtain airbags
3-point (lap sash) seatbelt for all occupants
Height adjustable seatbelts for driver and front passenger
Seat pretensioners and load limiters for for all passengers
Child seat anchor points
Headrests for all occupants
Active head restraints for driver and front passenger
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD)
Brake assist
Electronic stability program (ESP)
Traction control
Rear parking sensors
Rear vision mirror
Electric side mirrors
Heated side mirrors
Electric windows – front only with auto up/down function for all windows
Cruise control
HID headlights
Side indicators integrated into side mirrors
Automatic headlights
Coming/leaving home function
High-mounted stop light
Daytime running lights (DRL)
Headlight washers
Interior lights – interior main, glovebox and boot
Intermittent wipers with speed settings
Rain sensing (auto) wipers
Rear wiper
Remote central locking
Push button start
Engine immobiliser
Alarm
Tachometer
Fuel gauge
Trip computer
Monochrome driver’s display
Power steering
Steering wheel – tilt (up/down) and telescopic (reach) adjust
Multi-functional leather steering wheel
Leather gear knob and handbrake
Dual-zone climate control
Sports seats
Cloth upholstery
Manually adjustable driver’s and front passenger’s seat
Manual lumbar support adjustment for driver
Infotainment system screen
6-speaker sound system
AM/FM radio
CD player
Bluetooth connectivity – phone and audio streaming
iPod connectivity
USB connectivity
Front cup holders – 2x
Front bottle holders – 2x
Centre console storage
Glovebox
60:40 rear folding seats

RS 265 (August 2012) update:

New headlight cluster design
Daytime LED running lights
New steering wheel
Driver mode settings

RS 265 (June 2014) update:

18-inch ‘Tibor’ alloy wheels
Headlight design
New upper grille design
Larger Renault badge
R-Link infotainment system
Satellite navigation

Sport Limited (2014)

Price when new: $36,990

Price used: $7,300 - $12,300

In addition to Cup:

18-inch Silver Tibor alloy wheels
Gloss black styling pack: front and rear diffusers, side mirrors, door handles, rear spoiler
Recaro sports seats
Leatherette upholstery

Sport Limited loses the following features:

Dual-zone climate control (replaced with manual air conditioning)
Auto headlights
Rain-sensing wipers
Limited slip differential

Monaco GP (2011)

Price when new: $48,990

Price used: $8,000 - $13,300

In addition to Cup:

19-inch alloy wheels
Pearlescent white paint finish
Black headlight masks
Piano black side mirrors, fog light surrounds and rear diffuser
Fixed glass sunroof with shade cover
“Monaco GP” stitching for seats and floor mats
Leather upholstery
Electrically adjustable front seats
Heated front seats
Satellie navigation

Australian GP (2012)

Price when new: $49,990

Price used: $8,600 - $14,100

In addition to Cup:

19-inch alloy wheels
Gloss black paint finish
Fixed glass sunroof with shade cover
Directional bi-xenon headlights
Recaro front sports seats
Satellie navigation

Red Bull (2012)

Price when new: $44,640

Price used: $7,600 - $12,800

In addition to Cup:

18-inch TIBOR alloy wheels
Unique black “Star” metallic paint job with contrasting yellow highlights
Yellow painted F1 style front blade, side miror housings and diffuser
Red painted brake calipers
Remote central locking with keyless entry (via button on door handle)
Individually numbered plaques
Recaro sports front seats

Cup Trophy (2010-12)

Price when new: $46,990

Price used: $6,900 - $12,900

In addition to Cup:

19-inch alloy wheels
Dark grey styling on: front edge, side view mirrors, rear diffuser
Satin chrome door handles
Chrome exhaust
Tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS)
Remote central locking with keyless entry (via button on door handle)
Push button start
Heated side mirrors
Interior lights – courtesy light, map/reading lights,
Recaro sports front seats
8-speaker Arkamys sound system

Cup+ (2013-14)

Price when new: $44,640

Price used: $9,400 - $15,100

In addition to Cup:

Leather upholstery
Heated front seats
Electrically adjustable driver’s seat

Trophy (2012-13, 2014-2016)

Price when new: $47,140 - $53,000

Price used: $8,300 - $22,200

In addition to Cup:

19-inch alloy wheels
Chrome exhaust
Tyre pressure monitoring system (TPMS)
Remote central locking with keyless entry (via button on door handle)
Push button start
Heated side mirrors
Interior lights – courtesy light, map/reading lights,
Recaro sports front seats
8-speaker Arkamys sound system

RS 275 Trophy (September 2014):

19-inch alloy wheels
F1 style front blade, side mirror housings and diffuser
Akrapovic titanium central exhuast system with carbon fibre tip
Alcantara wrapped steering wheel
Alcantara wrapped gear shirt lever and handbrake grip
Zamac alloy gear knob
Recaro front sports seats
Alcantara/leather upholstery

Trophy 8:08 Red Bull (2012)

Price when new: $49,990

Price used: $9,100 - $14,700

In addition to Trophy:

Two colour options: pearl white or liquid yellow
Bi-xenon headlights
Leather upholstery
Recaro sports seats

Trophy Red Bull RB8 (2013)

Price when new: $49,990

Price used: $11,050 - $17,100

In addition to Trophy:

19-inch alloy wheels with pinstripes
“Crepuscule Blue” paint finish
Red Bull and Platinum Silver door handles, side mirrors and spoilers
Individually numbered plaque on the door-sill trims
Recaro front sports seats with “Red Bull” embossed on the seats
Floor mats

Cup Premium (2014-2016)

Price when new: $47,990 - $53,000

Price used: $11,850 - $22,200

In addition to Cup:

RS 265 Cup Premium:
19-inch ‘Steel’ alloy wheels
Rear view camera
Recaro sports bucket seats
Leather upholstery

RS 275 Cup Premium:

19-inch black ‘Speedline’ alloy wheels
Platinum grey front blade
Akrapovic titanium central exhuast system with carbon fibre tip
Alcantara wrapped steering wheel
Alcantara wrapped gear shirt lever and handbrake grip
Zamac alloy gear knob
Recaro front sports seats
Alcantara/leather upholstery

Trophy+ (2012-14)

Price when new: $51,640

Price used: $9,400 - $16,850

In addition to Trophy:

Panoramic sunroof
Front parking sensors
Reversing camera
Driver’s memory settings: electric seats
Leather upholstery
Electrically adjustable front seats
Heated front seats
Satellite navigation

Trophy-R

Price when new: $61,990 - $62,000

Price used: $14,850 - $26,750

In addition to Trophy:

19-inch black ‘Speedline’ alloy wheels
Ohlins ‘Road & Track’ one-way adjustable dampers
Nurburgring Accessory Kit: lithium-ion battery, steel/aluminium brake discs
Mechanical limited slip differential
Recaro Pole Position polycarbonate monocoque front seats
Six-point harness seat belts
Alcantara seat upholstery
Rear strut brace (rear seats removed)

Rather than asking yourself if you should buy a Renault Megane RS, maybe the more important question is, am I willing to enter a relationship with a Renault Megane RS.

If you are simply in the market for just a car, we’re sorry but as brilliant as the Megane RS is to look at, sit in and drive, no you probably shouldn’t buy one.

While there are pristine, fastidiously maintained and unicorn examples on the used market, there are unfortunately plenty more that have been neglected, mistreated and potentially abused, and now that the long list of common faults are only going to grow longer, the wrong Megane RS can quickly become a very expensive headache.

However, if you’re happy to enter a relationship with a Renault Megane RS, that’s potentially a different story.

You have to work hard at relationships to get the most out of them, they require commitment, constant maintenance, they need your undivided attention, unwavering support and unconditional love and they can be very very expensive.

This is what owning a used Renault Megane RS potentially is, like a relationship, if you let things slip, you’ll pay the price, and unfortunately, even if you do everything right, it can still fall apart.

However, just like the very best relationships, no matter how tough things may get, the good somehow always outweighs the bad.

Or maybe you’re just suffering from Stockholm syndrome and can’t see that you’re actually in a toxic relationship.

Rather than asking yourself if you should buy a Renault Megane RS, maybe the more important question is, am I willing to enter a relationship with a Renault Megane RS.

If you are simply in the market for just a car, we’re sorry but as brilliant as the Megane RS is to look at, sit in and drive, no you probably shouldn’t buy one.

While there are pristine, fastidiously maintained and unicorn examples on the used market, there are unfortunately plenty more that have been neglected, mistreated and potentially abused, and now that the long list of common faults are only going to grow longer, the wrong Megane RS can quickly become a very expensive headache.

However, if you’re happy to enter a relationship with a Renault Megane RS, that’s potentially a different story.

You have to work hard at relationships to get the most out of them, they require commitment, constant maintenance, they need your undivided attention, unwavering support and unconditional love and they can be very very expensive.

This is what owning a used Renault Megane RS potentially is, like a relationship, if you let things slip, you’ll pay the price, and unfortunately, even if you do everything right, it can still fall apart.

However, just like the very best relationships, no matter how tough things may get, the good somehow always outweighs the bad.

Or maybe you’re just suffering from Stockholm syndrome and can’t see that you’re actually in a toxic relationship.

Rather than asking yourself if you should buy a Renault Megane RS, maybe the more important question is, am I willing to enter a relationship with a Renault Megane RS.

If you are simply in the market for just a car, we’re sorry but as brilliant as the Megane RS is to look at, sit in and drive, no you probably shouldn’t buy one.

While there are pristine, fastidiously maintained and unicorn examples on the used market, there are unfortunately plenty more that have been neglected, mistreated and potentially abused, and now that the long list of common faults are only going to grow longer, the wrong Megane RS can quickly become a very expensive headache.

However, if you’re happy to enter a relationship with a Renault Megane RS, that’s potentially a different story.

You have to work hard at relationships to get the most out of them, they require commitment, constant maintenance, they need your undivided attention, unwavering support and unconditional love and they can be very very expensive.

This is what owning a used Renault Megane RS potentially is, like a relationship, if you let things slip, you’ll pay the price, and unfortunately, even if you do everything right, it can still fall apart.

However, just like the very best relationships, no matter how tough things may get, the good somehow always outweighs the bad.

Or maybe you’re just suffering from Stockholm syndrome and can’t see that you’re actually in a toxic relationship.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of May 26, 2022.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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