Pros

  • Offers an immense amount of car for the money.
  • Excellent build quality and reliability.
  • Many mechanical components shared with local models.
  • A unique vehicle while being a totally sensible choice, especially in Hybrid form.

Cons

  • Crown exclusive parts (e.g body panels) may be challenging to source.
  • Hybrid systems possibly past their best and may require attention.
  • Many have been ruined with poor modifications and tuning.
  • Insurance costs may ask a premium.

Verdict

Should you buy one? Absolutely, the S200, 13th-generation Toyota Crown is a compelling choice, and if you’re in the market for a vehicle of this caliber, it’s hard to justify opting for anything else. The Crown not only competes with but often outshines its European counterparts in terms of luxury...

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Publish: December 22, 2023

The Toyota Crown, a mid-sized luxury car, has been a staple in the Japanese automotive market since 1955, spanning over 16 generations. In this overview, our focus is on the thirteenth generation S200, produced from 2008 to 2012.

Locally, the Crown is exclusively available as a grey import. However, for those considering a purchase in Japan, the model has been offered in a diverse range of variants, typical of many JDM cars.

In the Australian used car market, the S200 series encompasses three primary variants: the 3.5-litre V6 Athlete, the 3.5-litre V6 Hybrid, and the flagship 4.6-litre V8 Majesta. Transmission options vary between 6 or 8-speed automatics and a CVT for the Hybrid, with the latter, unlike many CVT, not necessarily viewed negatively, as we’ll elaborate shortly.

The model lineup is nuanced, particularly with the Athlete and Hybrid versions, where specifications can differ based on the year of manufacture and optional features. Therefore, despite the badging, each example may offer a unique set of features.

Adding complexity, the Majesta variant exhibits variations based on its sub-variants, with the possibility of featuring a 3.0L V6 or a 4.3L V8 and, in some instances, four-wheel drive instead of the more common rear-wheel drive platform. Furthermore, exclusive models like the Supercharged V6 Modellista exist, showcasing the diverse options available in the Japanese tuning scene.

Considering the popularity of tuning and the inherent variations in grey imports, prospective buyers should be aware of potential risks associated with purchasing a Crown. The diverse array of

The Toyota Crown, a mid-sized luxury car, has been a staple in the Japanese automotive market since 1955, spanning over 16 generations. In this overview, our focus is on the thirteenth generation S200, produced from 2008 to 2012.

Locally, the Crown is exclusively available as a grey import. However, for those considering a purchase in Japan, the model has been offered in a diverse range of variants, typical of many JDM cars.

In the Australian used car market, the S200 series encompasses three primary variants: the 3.5-litre V6 Athlete, the 3.5-litre V6 Hybrid, and the flagship 4.6-litre V8 Majesta. Transmission options vary between 6 or 8-speed automatics and a CVT for the Hybrid, with the latter, unlike many CVT, not necessarily viewed negatively, as we’ll elaborate shortly.

The model lineup is nuanced, particularly with the Athlete and Hybrid versions, where specifications can differ based on the year of manufacture and optional features. Therefore, despite the badging, each example may offer a unique set of features.

Adding complexity, the Majesta variant exhibits variations based on its sub-variants, with the possibility of featuring a 3.0L V6 or a 4.3L V8 and, in some instances, four-wheel drive instead of the more common rear-wheel drive platform. Furthermore, exclusive models like the Supercharged V6 Modellista exist, showcasing the diverse options available in the Japanese tuning scene.

Considering the popularity of tuning and the inherent variations in grey imports, prospective buyers should be aware of potential risks associated with purchasing a Crown. The diverse array of options, coupled with the preferences of previous owners, make each imported Crown a unique proposition, emphasizing the need for thorough inspection and research before making a decision.

The Toyota Crown, a mid-sized luxury car, has been a staple in the Japanese automotive market since 1955, spanning over 16 generations. In this overview, our focus is on the thirteenth generation S200, produced from 2008 to 2012.

Locally, the Crown is exclusively available as a grey import. However, for those considering a purchase in Japan, the model has been offered in a diverse range of variants, typical of many JDM cars.

In the Australian used car market, the S200 series encompasses three primary variants: the 3.5-litre V6 Athlete, the 3.5-litre V6 Hybrid, and the flagship 4.6-litre V8 Majesta. Transmission options vary between 6 or 8-speed automatics and a CVT for the Hybrid, with the latter, unlike many CVT, not necessarily viewed negatively, as we’ll elaborate shortly.

The model lineup is nuanced, particularly with the Athlete and Hybrid versions, where specifications can differ based on the year of manufacture and optional features. Therefore, despite the badging, each example may offer a unique set of features.

Adding complexity, the Majesta variant exhibits variations based on its sub-variants, with the possibility of featuring a 3.0L V6 or a 4.3L V8 and, in some instances, four-wheel drive instead of the more common rear-wheel drive platform. Furthermore, exclusive models like the Supercharged V6 Modellista exist, showcasing the diverse options available in the Japanese tuning scene.

Considering the popularity of tuning and the inherent variations in grey imports, prospective buyers should be aware of potential risks associated with purchasing a Crown. The diverse array of options, coupled with the preferences of previous owners, make each imported Crown a unique proposition, emphasizing the need for thorough inspection and research before making a decision.

Exterior:

While not a fault inherent to the car, if the unfortunate circumstance arises where the vehicle sustains damage, acquiring replacement body panels or a new bonnet may pose a challenge. Importing these parts could involve both time and a premium cost. Although such scenarios are not commonplace, they should be taken into account when considering the purchase of an imported vehicle.

 

Interior:

Reports of faults within the interior are sporadic and infrequent, with occasional mentions of door lock actuators or powered blinds experiencing issues. These occurrences, however, are far from being widespread problems.

Moreover, due to the shared components with other Toyota and Lexus models, obtaining interior parts is generally straightforward and economically feasible. The widespread availability of these components contributes to ease of maintenance and repair, enhancing the overall ownership experience.

 

Mechanically:

Both versions of the V6 engines in the S200 13th generation Toyota Crown are widely acknowledged as among the most reliable petrol engines available. 

Numerous examples have demonstrated exceptional durability, often surpassing 600,000 kilometres with minimal issues. While occasional instances of a leaking water pump, excessive oil consumption or a minor oil leak may arise on poorly maintained examples, these occurrences are significantly less frequent compared to other vehicles in the same class.

However, unlike many engines from European or American manufacturers in this category, the V6 engines in the Crown exhibit a higher tolerance for neglect, outperforming their competitors.

The same can be said of the 1UR V8. It also boasts incredible reliability, even without meticulous maintenance.

The hybrid systems and transmissions across all Crown models are likewise highly dependable. As the S200 models age, the hybrid batteries may be beyond their peak performance and could require attention, but reports of outright failures are scarce. 

With the surge in popularity of hybrid vehicles, particularly those from Toyota and Lexus, numerous specialised repairers are available to address hybrid battery packs and systems at affordable rates. A pro tip: consider exploring various repair options before heading directly to Toyota, doing so could potentially save thousands of dollars.

There are very few documented cases of serious driveline issues, as highlighted in the overview, including the Hybrid models CVT. In fact this Toyota CVT may possibly be one of the most robust and reliable CVT units available.

For Crowns equipped with air suspension, a common trait among cars featuring this technology, there may be occasional issues. The nature of the problem can range from a straightforward and cost-effective fix to potentially significant expenses associated with the replacement of major components. Some members in owners’ groups suggest opting for high-quality, comfort-oriented coil overs instead of air suspension. However, opinions on this matter vary, and the decision

Exterior:

While not a fault inherent to the car, if the unfortunate circumstance arises where the vehicle sustains damage, acquiring replacement body panels or a new bonnet may pose a challenge. Importing these parts could involve both time and a premium cost. Although such scenarios are not commonplace, they should be taken into account when considering the purchase of an imported vehicle.

 

Interior:

Reports of faults within the interior are sporadic and infrequent, with occasional mentions of door lock actuators or powered blinds experiencing issues. These occurrences, however, are far from being widespread problems.

Moreover, due to the shared components with other Toyota and Lexus models, obtaining interior parts is generally straightforward and economically feasible. The widespread availability of these components contributes to ease of maintenance and repair, enhancing the overall ownership experience.

 

Mechanically:

Both versions of the V6 engines in the S200 13th generation Toyota Crown are widely acknowledged as among the most reliable petrol engines available. 

Numerous examples have demonstrated exceptional durability, often surpassing 600,000 kilometres with minimal issues. While occasional instances of a leaking water pump, excessive oil consumption or a minor oil leak may arise on poorly maintained examples, these occurrences are significantly less frequent compared to other vehicles in the same class.

However, unlike many engines from European or American manufacturers in this category, the V6 engines in the Crown exhibit a higher tolerance for neglect, outperforming their competitors.

The same can be said of the 1UR V8. It also boasts incredible reliability, even without meticulous maintenance.

The hybrid systems and transmissions across all Crown models are likewise highly dependable. As the S200 models age, the hybrid batteries may be beyond their peak performance and could require attention, but reports of outright failures are scarce. 

With the surge in popularity of hybrid vehicles, particularly those from Toyota and Lexus, numerous specialised repairers are available to address hybrid battery packs and systems at affordable rates. A pro tip: consider exploring various repair options before heading directly to Toyota, doing so could potentially save thousands of dollars.

There are very few documented cases of serious driveline issues, as highlighted in the overview, including the Hybrid models CVT. In fact this Toyota CVT may possibly be one of the most robust and reliable CVT units available.

For Crowns equipped with air suspension, a common trait among cars featuring this technology, there may be occasional issues. The nature of the problem can range from a straightforward and cost-effective fix to potentially significant expenses associated with the replacement of major components. Some members in owners’ groups suggest opting for high-quality, comfort-oriented coil overs instead of air suspension. However, opinions on this matter vary, and the decision on how to address air suspension issues ultimately rests with the owner in the event of a malfunction.

As mentioned previously, major mechanical concerns typically arise from ill-advised modifications, harsh driving practices, or a questionable maintenance history. A comprehensive pre-purchase inspection is recommended to identify any potential red flags and ensure a sound investment.

 

Exterior:

While not a fault inherent to the car, if the unfortunate circumstance arises where the vehicle sustains damage, acquiring replacement body panels or a new bonnet may pose a challenge. Importing these parts could involve both time and a premium cost. Although such scenarios are not commonplace, they should be taken into account when considering the purchase of an imported vehicle.

 

Interior:

Reports of faults within the interior are sporadic and infrequent, with occasional mentions of door lock actuators or powered blinds experiencing issues. These occurrences, however, are far from being widespread problems.

Moreover, due to the shared components with other Toyota and Lexus models, obtaining interior parts is generally straightforward and economically feasible. The widespread availability of these components contributes to ease of maintenance and repair, enhancing the overall ownership experience.

 

Mechanically:

Both versions of the V6 engines in the S200 13th generation Toyota Crown are widely acknowledged as among the most reliable petrol engines available. 

Numerous examples have demonstrated exceptional durability, often surpassing 600,000 kilometres with minimal issues. While occasional instances of a leaking water pump, excessive oil consumption or a minor oil leak may arise on poorly maintained examples, these occurrences are significantly less frequent compared to other vehicles in the same class.

However, unlike many engines from European or American manufacturers in this category, the V6 engines in the Crown exhibit a higher tolerance for neglect, outperforming their competitors.

The same can be said of the 1UR V8. It also boasts incredible reliability, even without meticulous maintenance.

The hybrid systems and transmissions across all Crown models are likewise highly dependable. As the S200 models age, the hybrid batteries may be beyond their peak performance and could require attention, but reports of outright failures are scarce. 

With the surge in popularity of hybrid vehicles, particularly those from Toyota and Lexus, numerous specialised repairers are available to address hybrid battery packs and systems at affordable rates. A pro tip: consider exploring various repair options before heading directly to Toyota, doing so could potentially save thousands of dollars.

There are very few documented cases of serious driveline issues, as highlighted in the overview, including the Hybrid models CVT. In fact this Toyota CVT may possibly be one of the most robust and reliable CVT units available.

For Crowns equipped with air suspension, a common trait among cars featuring this technology, there may be occasional issues. The nature of the problem can range from a straightforward and cost-effective fix to potentially significant expenses associated with the replacement of major components. Some members in owners’ groups suggest opting for high-quality, comfort-oriented coil overs instead of air suspension. However, opinions on this matter vary, and the decision on how to address air suspension issues ultimately rests with the owner in the event of a malfunction.

As mentioned previously, major mechanical concerns typically arise from ill-advised modifications, harsh driving practices, or a questionable maintenance history. A comprehensive pre-purchase inspection is recommended to identify any potential red flags and ensure a sound investment.

 

Body Style:

4-door Sedan

Engine Specs:

3.5L V6 (2GR-FSE)

232kW (311hp) and 377 Nm (278 lb.ft)

Hybrid:

3.5L V6 (2GR-FXE)

254kW (340hp) ICE + Hybrid combined

Majesta:

4.6L V8 (1UR-FSE)

255kW – 287kW (301hp – 385hp) and 500Nm (369 lb.ft)

Transmission:

6-speed automatic

8-speed automatic (V8 Majesty only)

CVT (Hybrid only)

Fuel Consumption:

7.8 – 11L/100km

Length:

4870mm

Width:

1795mm

Height:

1470mm

Kerb Weight:

1792kg – 1863kg

Body Style:

4-door Sedan

Engine Specs:

3.5L V6 (2GR-FSE)

232kW (311hp) and 377 Nm (278 lb.ft)

Hybrid:

3.5L V6 (2GR-FXE)

254kW (340hp) ICE + Hybrid combined

Majesta:

4.6L V8 (1UR-FSE)

255kW – 287kW (301hp – 385hp) and 500Nm (369 lb.ft)

Transmission:

6-speed automatic

8-speed automatic (V8 Majesty only)

CVT (Hybrid only)

Fuel Consumption:

7.8 – 11L/100km

Length:

4870mm

Width:

1795mm

Height:

1470mm

Kerb Weight:

1792kg – 1863kg

Body Style:

4-door Sedan

Engine Specs:

3.5L V6 (2GR-FSE)

232kW (311hp) and 377 Nm (278 lb.ft)

Hybrid:

3.5L V6 (2GR-FXE)

254kW (340hp) ICE + Hybrid combined

Majesta:

4.6L V8 (1UR-FSE)

255kW – 287kW (301hp – 385hp) and 500Nm (369 lb.ft)

Transmission:

6-speed automatic

8-speed automatic (V8 Majesty only)

CVT (Hybrid only)

Fuel Consumption:

7.8 – 11L/100km

Length:

4870mm

Width:

1795mm

Height:

1470mm

Kerb Weight:

1792kg – 1863kg

Warranty:

N/A – Grey import

Model range, pricing & features

Toyota Crown V6 Hybrid-1

Crown Royal

Price when new: Price when new: NA

Price used: Price used: $15,000 - $23,000

It’s important to note, base model Crown Royal can vary substantially depending on options fitted.

 

Equipment:

  • 16” Alloy Wheels
  • Xenon headlights
  • Fog Lights
  • Aux input socket (MP3/CD/cassette)
  • Inbuilt hard disk drive
  • Multi-function control screen – colour
  • CD player
  • 8 speaker stereo
  • Active noise control
  • Power steering
  • Power windows (auto front)
  • Power mirrors
  • Power folding mirrors
  • Climate control 2 zone
  • Immobiliser
  • Trip Computer
  • Keyless entry
  • Reversing Camera
  • Touch screen
  • Satellite Navigation
  • Power adjustable front seats
  • Optional Leather interior
  • Auto Cruise Control
  • Sport, Snow, Eco drive modes
  • Multiple airbags
  • ABS with EBD
  • Auxiliary braking system
  • Adaptive road lighting
  • Electronic traction control
  • Electronic stability control
  • Pre-crash and avoidance safety systems
  • GPS linked braking assist
  • Blind spot warning
  • Driver fatigue monitoring
  • Navigation/Artificial Intelligence-Adaptive Variable Suspension System
  • Collision avoidance system (PCS) with front-side millimetre wave radar
  • Active automotive night vision system

Crown Athlete

Price when new: Price when new: NA

Price used: Price used: $17,000 - $28,000

The Athlete combines the luxurious aspects of the Royal series together with more aggressive styling and sporty features.

 

Adds:

  • 17” or 18” Alloy Wheels
  • Sport bodykit
  • Directional headlights
  • Bluetooth connectivity
  • DVD /TV Playback
  • CD multi-disc changer
  • 10 or 12 speaker stereo
  • Powered Sunroof
  • Powered sunshades
  • Leather interior trim
  • Wood trim panelling
  • Rear parking sensors
  • Power seat adjustment (front and rear)
  • Power steering wheel adjustment
  • Heated and cooled front seats
  • Heated rear seats (G Package)
  • Rear audio and climate controls (G package)
  • Smart key
  • Automatic headlights
  • Rain sensing wipers
  • LCD screen gauges
  • Push button start
  • Multiple cameras (optional)
  • 360 Parking assist (optional)
  • Power boot lid (optional)

 

Crown Hybrid

Price when new: Price when new: NA

Price used: Price used: $17,500 - $29,000

A trim level designated for the Hybrid Synergy Drive V6 drivetrain which achieves excellent fuel economy and performance. Toyota claims the Crown Hybrid has 4.5L V8 performance with the fuel economy of a 2 L 4 cylinder.

Most examples feature ostensibly the same features as Crown Athlete.

 

 

Crown Majesta

Price when new: Price when new: NA

Price used: Price used: $20,000 - $37,000

The top end luxury model Crown features different styling and more luxurious equipment, fit and finish than the Royal and Athlete series. Majesta models features vary depending on which of the A Type, C-Type, G-Type or G-Type F Package variants it is.

 

Adds:

  • 18”, 19” or 20” Alloy Wheels
  • Air suspension
  • 3-zone climate control
  • USB inputs
  • Premium leather interior
  • DVD multi-disc changer
  • Premium surround sound system
  • Majesta wood trim panelling
  • Front and rear parking sensors
  • 4 or 5 seat option
  • Heated and cooled front and rear seats
  • Memory function front and rear seats
  • Power leg rests (rear seats)
  • Flip forward passenger seat section (G-Type F Package)
  • Flip down screens (rear)
  • Rear audio and climate controls
  • Rear refrigerator (G-Type F Package)

 

Should you buy one? Absolutely, the S200, 13th-generation Toyota Crown is a compelling choice, and if you’re in the market for a vehicle of this caliber, it’s hard to justify opting for anything else. The Crown not only competes with but often outshines its European counterparts in terms of luxury ambiance and subjective appeal. Its exclusivity and robust reliability, coupled with lower maintenance and repair costs, make it a standout option.

In the Australian market, even factoring in the hybrid battery replacement cost, well-maintained Crowns frequently command prices several thousand dollars lower than equivalent Commodores and Falcons with similar mileage and condition. For enthusiasts of Australian-made cars, it’s worth noting that the Crown surpasses them in build quality.

With a diverse array of examples arriving on Australian shores, catering to various tastes and budgets, there’s likely a Crown to suit almost every preference. Having explored a wide range of cars, we can confidently assert that the Toyota Crown stands out as one of the most impressive vehicles we’ve encountered. The recommendation is clear: go ahead and buy one, but be discerning in your choice of sellers to ensure a satisfying ownership experience.

Should you buy one? Absolutely, the S200, 13th-generation Toyota Crown is a compelling choice, and if you’re in the market for a vehicle of this caliber, it’s hard to justify opting for anything else. The Crown not only competes with but often outshines its European counterparts in terms of luxury ambiance and subjective appeal. Its exclusivity and robust reliability, coupled with lower maintenance and repair costs, make it a standout option.

In the Australian market, even factoring in the hybrid battery replacement cost, well-maintained Crowns frequently command prices several thousand dollars lower than equivalent Commodores and Falcons with similar mileage and condition. For enthusiasts of Australian-made cars, it’s worth noting that the Crown surpasses them in build quality.

With a diverse array of examples arriving on Australian shores, catering to various tastes and budgets, there’s likely a Crown to suit almost every preference. Having explored a wide range of cars, we can confidently assert that the Toyota Crown stands out as one of the most impressive vehicles we’ve encountered. The recommendation is clear: go ahead and buy one, but be discerning in your choice of sellers to ensure a satisfying ownership experience.

Should you buy one? Absolutely, the S200, 13th-generation Toyota Crown is a compelling choice, and if you’re in the market for a vehicle of this caliber, it’s hard to justify opting for anything else. The Crown not only competes with but often outshines its European counterparts in terms of luxury ambiance and subjective appeal. Its exclusivity and robust reliability, coupled with lower maintenance and repair costs, make it a standout option.

In the Australian market, even factoring in the hybrid battery replacement cost, well-maintained Crowns frequently command prices several thousand dollars lower than equivalent Commodores and Falcons with similar mileage and condition. For enthusiasts of Australian-made cars, it’s worth noting that the Crown surpasses them in build quality.

With a diverse array of examples arriving on Australian shores, catering to various tastes and budgets, there’s likely a Crown to suit almost every preference. Having explored a wide range of cars, we can confidently assert that the Toyota Crown stands out as one of the most impressive vehicles we’ve encountered. The recommendation is clear: go ahead and buy one, but be discerning in your choice of sellers to ensure a satisfying ownership experience.

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