Pros

  • The cool alternate choice when it comes to large premium European cars
  • Excellent interior, practicality, comfort, and quality
  • V8 engine examples offer a truly unique experience
  • Typical Volvo safety and features are both copious

Cons

  • Depending on the model and engine, can suffer from major mechanical issues
  • Volvo parts and labour often ask a premium
  • A faultless service and maintenance history is imperative
  • Non-V8 models are not special enough to justify the running costs and risks

Verdict

If we’re talking the V8, if it’s in incredible condition, has a faultless history and you’re happy to give it the care and attention it requires, yes you should buy one. The V8 S80 is a unique vehicle and the right example can be a brilliant car.

However, when it...

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The second generation Volvo S80 was a welcome return for the model in the Australian market. After a short hiatus, the new S80 was launched in 2007 with a range of engine options, including a 3.2-litre six-cylinder petrol, 3.0-litre six-cylinder turbo petrol, a 2.4-litre turbocharged diesel, and most notably, a 4.4-litre V8. All engines were mated to a six-speed gearbox driving all four wheels via a Haldex four-wheel drive system.

However with the first update in 2009, Volvo simplified the range dropping the naturally aspirated 3.2-litre 6 while the update in 2010 saw the diesel discontinued.

Obviously with the updates there were also cosmetic changes and updates to the tech and features plus, as well as these major updates, Volvo tweaked and enhanced the S80 pretty much every year of its existence.

Then you have the trim specs which generally only consist of the base model of each badge like D5, T6 and V8 and a higher spec of each of those called R-Design, although the T6 has also been available in a Luxury spec.

The S80’s styling was arguably a marked improvement over the previous generation, with sculpted lines and a more modern look. The interior was also impressive, with a luxurious cabin that many described as being almost like a Swedish lounge room.

The S80 was well-received by Australian buyers, and it quickly became a popular choice for those looking for a less predictable European premium large sedan. It was widely praised for its safety, comfort, and driving

The second generation Volvo S80 was a welcome return for the model in the Australian market. After a short hiatus, the new S80 was launched in 2007 with a range of engine options, including a 3.2-litre six-cylinder petrol, 3.0-litre six-cylinder turbo petrol, a 2.4-litre turbocharged diesel, and most notably, a 4.4-litre V8. All engines were mated to a six-speed gearbox driving all four wheels via a Haldex four-wheel drive system.

However with the first update in 2009, Volvo simplified the range dropping the naturally aspirated 3.2-litre 6 while the update in 2010 saw the diesel discontinued.

Obviously with the updates there were also cosmetic changes and updates to the tech and features plus, as well as these major updates, Volvo tweaked and enhanced the S80 pretty much every year of its existence.

Then you have the trim specs which generally only consist of the base model of each badge like D5, T6 and V8 and a higher spec of each of those called R-Design, although the T6 has also been available in a Luxury spec.

The S80’s styling was arguably a marked improvement over the previous generation, with sculpted lines and a more modern look. The interior was also impressive, with a luxurious cabin that many described as being almost like a Swedish lounge room.

The S80 was well-received by Australian buyers, and it quickly became a popular choice for those looking for a less predictable European premium large sedan. It was widely praised for its safety, comfort, and driving dynamics.

The S80 was discontinued in Australia in 2013, and remains the alternate choice on the used car market for those after a premium European large sedan.

However, with a long list of common mechanical, electronic and reliability complaints, apart parts and labour that often ask a premium, buying the wrong S80 can often result in buying the previous owners problems.

A well cared for and thoroughly maintained Volvo S80 can be a winner but as you’ll see, an uninformed purchase can be a nightmare.

The second generation Volvo S80 was a welcome return for the model in the Australian market. After a short hiatus, the new S80 was launched in 2007 with a range of engine options, including a 3.2-litre six-cylinder petrol, 3.0-litre six-cylinder turbo petrol, a 2.4-litre turbocharged diesel, and most notably, a 4.4-litre V8. All engines were mated to a six-speed gearbox driving all four wheels via a Haldex four-wheel drive system.

However with the first update in 2009, Volvo simplified the range dropping the naturally aspirated 3.2-litre 6 while the update in 2010 saw the diesel discontinued.

Obviously with the updates there were also cosmetic changes and updates to the tech and features plus, as well as these major updates, Volvo tweaked and enhanced the S80 pretty much every year of its existence.

Then you have the trim specs which generally only consist of the base model of each badge like D5, T6 and V8 and a higher spec of each of those called R-Design, although the T6 has also been available in a Luxury spec.

The S80’s styling was arguably a marked improvement over the previous generation, with sculpted lines and a more modern look. The interior was also impressive, with a luxurious cabin that many described as being almost like a Swedish lounge room.

The S80 was well-received by Australian buyers, and it quickly became a popular choice for those looking for a less predictable European premium large sedan. It was widely praised for its safety, comfort, and driving dynamics.

The S80 was discontinued in Australia in 2013, and remains the alternate choice on the used car market for those after a premium European large sedan.

However, with a long list of common mechanical, electronic and reliability complaints, apart parts and labour that often ask a premium, buying the wrong S80 can often result in buying the previous owners problems.

A well cared for and thoroughly maintained Volvo S80 can be a winner but as you’ll see, an uninformed purchase can be a nightmare.

It is important to remember the Volvo S80 was built during the time that Ford owned Volvo, Jaguar and Land Rover so there are often common issues across all Ford brands.

Exterior:

There are reports of the headlights and tail lights flickering and sometimes failing intermittently.

The underside of the body is susceptible to rust and corrosion and the subframe is a good (or bad) example of this.

Because the exhaust runs close to the subframe, the paintwork can deteriorate, which results in a lot of rust and even large holes.

There are reports of anything powered by electricity on the exterior starting to have issues. Door lock actuators, powered mirrors playing up, there are also many sporadic reports of other electronic based issues and all are apparently becoming more common as the cars age.

Windscreens are known to lift from the windscreen aperture, resulting in water ingress into the cabin.

 

Interior:

Generally speaking, there are reports of various electronic issues, buttons failing to work, and some controls showing intermittent faults.

The blower motor within the HVAC system can fail, which is expensive to fix as the dashboard quite often needs to be removed to access it.

On S80’s fitted with a sunroof, if not cleaned correctly, water can leak into the cabin and the water can make its way into some critical areas causing electronic issues, sometimes impacting the cars ECU.

 

Mechanically:

Globally, the second generation S80 has been available with over 25 different engines which according to many mechanics and even Volvo specialists, is ridiculous

How can any car manufacturer possibly do effective R&D on a powertrain with so many engine variants? It makes you wonder that if Volvo had just focused on a small handful of engines, how much better they could’ve made the entire car? 

Luckily the second-generation S80 in Australia only featured four of those engine options, so we’ll be concentrating on these.

The 2.4-litre turbocharged diesel first. This engine suffers from the typical EGR complications that are fairly common across many modern turbo diesels however Volvo changed the EGR design in the later models, resulting in more efficiency and reliability.

Common turbo diesel DPF issues do occur however are no more common than in other similar cars of this generation. 

Other engine issues to expect are oil leaks and excessive oil consumption and clogged-up inlet systems. 

Oil dilution or making oil is a known issue. This is where unburnt fuel and particulates from the combustion process make their way past the piston rings into the sump. Oil is then sucked into the breather system and they run away, basically using used oil as fuel, which understandably can be catastrophic

It is important to remember the Volvo S80 was built during the time that Ford owned Volvo, Jaguar and Land Rover so there are often common issues across all Ford brands.

Exterior:

There are reports of the headlights and tail lights flickering and sometimes failing intermittently.

The underside of the body is susceptible to rust and corrosion and the subframe is a good (or bad) example of this.

Because the exhaust runs close to the subframe, the paintwork can deteriorate, which results in a lot of rust and even large holes.

There are reports of anything powered by electricity on the exterior starting to have issues. Door lock actuators, powered mirrors playing up, there are also many sporadic reports of other electronic based issues and all are apparently becoming more common as the cars age.

Windscreens are known to lift from the windscreen aperture, resulting in water ingress into the cabin.

 

Interior:

Generally speaking, there are reports of various electronic issues, buttons failing to work, and some controls showing intermittent faults.

The blower motor within the HVAC system can fail, which is expensive to fix as the dashboard quite often needs to be removed to access it.

On S80’s fitted with a sunroof, if not cleaned correctly, water can leak into the cabin and the water can make its way into some critical areas causing electronic issues, sometimes impacting the cars ECU.

 

Mechanically:

Globally, the second generation S80 has been available with over 25 different engines which according to many mechanics and even Volvo specialists, is ridiculous

How can any car manufacturer possibly do effective R&D on a powertrain with so many engine variants? It makes you wonder that if Volvo had just focused on a small handful of engines, how much better they could’ve made the entire car? 

Luckily the second-generation S80 in Australia only featured four of those engine options, so we’ll be concentrating on these.

The 2.4-litre turbocharged diesel first. This engine suffers from the typical EGR complications that are fairly common across many modern turbo diesels however Volvo changed the EGR design in the later models, resulting in more efficiency and reliability.

Common turbo diesel DPF issues do occur however are no more common than in other similar cars of this generation. 

Other engine issues to expect are oil leaks and excessive oil consumption and clogged-up inlet systems. 

Oil dilution or making oil is a known issue. This is where unburnt fuel and particulates from the combustion process make their way past the piston rings into the sump. Oil is then sucked into the breather system and they run away, basically using used oil as fuel, which understandably can be catastrophic for the engine if left unchecked.

The diesel does have a timing belt and it’s due every 180,000kms or 10 years. However, it will need to be done earlier if there are any oil leaks from the engine, which is very likely.

The 3.2-litre six-cylinder petrol and 3.0-litre six-cylinder turbo petrol are very closely related and both can suffer from oil leaks from vacuum pumps and cam covers and excessive oil consumption to the point where fowled spark plugs can become an issue. 

This is often made worse by overfilling the engine with oil thanks to people struggling to correctly operate a dipstick.

PCV diaphragm leaks are common but much easier and cheaper to repair than the older models. You’ll know if that’s leaking because the car will be running terribly, logging lean fault codes and you’ll hear a sucking squeaking sound from the top of the engine. 

They also have a very complicated and unconventional accessory drive setup where the serpentine belt and everything it drives, is at the transmission end of the engine. It isn’t particularly unreliable but absolutely more expensive to repair when something like the alternator over-run pulley dies or the gear-driven coupling itself gives up.  

Now to the Yamaha-developed 4.4-litre V8 which some say is the best engine ever put in a Volvo (it is definitely the best sounding).

Overall this is a really good engine but with one terrible fault.

The balance shaft bearing, which is located in the “V” of the engine, can basically swim in the water if the engine bay is exposed to excessive water, say in the case of engine bay cleaning. 

The bearing then corrodes and eventually fails, taking with it the balance shaft that then impacts the timing chain, resulting in a catastrophic engine failure. The cost of repair is often north of $15,000.

Late models feature a drainage line for any water to escape past the balance shaft bearing but it is imperative to have any S80 thoroughly inspected before purchase, especially the V8.

All of the engine variants have complicated cooling systems with many plastic parts, all of which now will be fatigued and starting to fail. 

In terms of the driveline, the Aisin 6-speed auto (in Australian models) is hugely popular and a version of it is used by just about every single manufacturer from Japan, Europe and the United States.

It is reliable and should be serviced every 60,000 km.

The All-Wheel Drive system is taken car of by a Haldex coupling, which is the same system used by VW, Audi and Land Rover and if well-serviced and maintained, is generally ok. 

 

Recalls:

  • March 2007 – Faulty Nipple PCV in Volvo XC90 and S80 models, affecting 544 units, may crack or come loose from the hose, leading to air leakage from the Crank Case Ventilation System, resulting in potential malfunction.
  • April 2009 – Volvo S80 and XC70 vehicles from 2006 to 2008 are affected by a CEM software deviation that may cause windshield wipers to malfunction, potentially activating by themselves or not responding to the driver’s command, posing a mechanical hazard
  • June 2009 – Volvo S80, XC70, V70, and XC60 vehicles, 753 units affected – A software error in the Fan Control Module (FCM) may cause the engine cooling fan to permanently stop working, leading to reduced Air Condition (AC) performance and potential engine overheating hazards.
  • September 2009 – Volvo S80, V70, and XC60 vehicles from 2007 to 2010 are affected by a fault in the fuel Pump Electronic Module (PEM) that may prevent the engine from starting or cause rough idling and stalling shortly after start-up, posing a hazard to vehicle operation. 761 units are affected.
  • June 2010 – Volvo recalls 484 units of S80, XC70, and XC60 models due to early wear on the belt tensioner, potentially causing noise and, in the worst case, leading to loss of drive and power steering assistance.
  • October 2010 – Some Volvo models (S60, S80, V70, XC60, and XC70) manufactured between 2009 and 2011 are affected by an electrical short circuit in the driver’s airbag clockspring wiring connector, potentially causing the supplemental restraint system lamp to be lit and displaying the message ‘AIRBAG SYSTEM SERVICE REQUIRED’; if the issue is ignored and an accident occurs where the driver’s airbag deployment is necessary, it may not function as intended. 1,307 units are affected.
  • November 2010 – Volvo recalls 629 units of S80, S60, V70, XC70 & XC60 due to a software calibration issue in the engine control module and transmission control module, leading to sudden engine stop during city driving, requiring additional accelerator pedal pressure for gear engagement.
  • January 2011 – Volvo issued a recall affecting 1,095 units of S80, V70, XC70 & XC60 models from 2008 to 2010 due to the engine oil level potentially exceeding the maximum level marking, leading to increased engine speed, and in the worst case, the engine may not stop running when switched off, continuing until it breaks down.
  • July 2011 – A fault has been identified in certain Volvo S80 vehicles manufactured between 2006 and 2007, affecting 79 units. The power steering return line may fail due to incorrect routing of the power steering cooling line, leading to a sudden loss of power steering assistance and posing an unreasonable risk to motor vehicle safety. In extreme cases, the power steering fluid may ignite, potentially causing an engine bay fire.
  • October 2011 – Volvo recalls 1,218 units of the S80, XC70, and XC60 models from the years 2006 to 2010 due to early wear on the auxiliary belt tensioner, which can lead to excessive noise, vehicle immobilization, and loss of power-steering assistance.
  • October 2011 – Fault in Volvo S80, XC70, and XC60 vehicles from 2006 to 2010 due to early wear on the auxiliary belt tensioner, affecting 801 units, potentially leading to excessive noise, immobilization of the vehicle, and loss of power-steering assistance.
  • August 2020 – Volvo recalls 24,961 units of S80, V70, XC70, S60, V60, and XC60 models manufactured between 2006 and 2019 due to a defect where the flexible steel cable connected to the seat belts on the outboard side of the front seats may fatigue and separate from the seat belt, potentially leading to inadequate occupant restraint in the event of an accident, posing an increased risk of serious injury or death.

It is important to remember the Volvo S80 was built during the time that Ford owned Volvo, Jaguar and Land Rover so there are often common issues across all Ford brands.

Exterior:

There are reports of the headlights and tail lights flickering and sometimes failing intermittently.

The underside of the body is susceptible to rust and corrosion and the subframe is a good (or bad) example of this.

Because the exhaust runs close to the subframe, the paintwork can deteriorate, which results in a lot of rust and even large holes.

There are reports of anything powered by electricity on the exterior starting to have issues. Door lock actuators, powered mirrors playing up, there are also many sporadic reports of other electronic based issues and all are apparently becoming more common as the cars age.

Windscreens are known to lift from the windscreen aperture, resulting in water ingress into the cabin.

 

Interior:

Generally speaking, there are reports of various electronic issues, buttons failing to work, and some controls showing intermittent faults.

The blower motor within the HVAC system can fail, which is expensive to fix as the dashboard quite often needs to be removed to access it.

On S80’s fitted with a sunroof, if not cleaned correctly, water can leak into the cabin and the water can make its way into some critical areas causing electronic issues, sometimes impacting the cars ECU.

 

Mechanically:

Globally, the second generation S80 has been available with over 25 different engines which according to many mechanics and even Volvo specialists, is ridiculous

How can any car manufacturer possibly do effective R&D on a powertrain with so many engine variants? It makes you wonder that if Volvo had just focused on a small handful of engines, how much better they could’ve made the entire car? 

Luckily the second-generation S80 in Australia only featured four of those engine options, so we’ll be concentrating on these.

The 2.4-litre turbocharged diesel first. This engine suffers from the typical EGR complications that are fairly common across many modern turbo diesels however Volvo changed the EGR design in the later models, resulting in more efficiency and reliability.

Common turbo diesel DPF issues do occur however are no more common than in other similar cars of this generation. 

Other engine issues to expect are oil leaks and excessive oil consumption and clogged-up inlet systems. 

Oil dilution or making oil is a known issue. This is where unburnt fuel and particulates from the combustion process make their way past the piston rings into the sump. Oil is then sucked into the breather system and they run away, basically using used oil as fuel, which understandably can be catastrophic for the engine if left unchecked.

The diesel does have a timing belt and it’s due every 180,000kms or 10 years. However, it will need to be done earlier if there are any oil leaks from the engine, which is very likely.

The 3.2-litre six-cylinder petrol and 3.0-litre six-cylinder turbo petrol are very closely related and both can suffer from oil leaks from vacuum pumps and cam covers and excessive oil consumption to the point where fowled spark plugs can become an issue. 

This is often made worse by overfilling the engine with oil thanks to people struggling to correctly operate a dipstick.

PCV diaphragm leaks are common but much easier and cheaper to repair than the older models. You’ll know if that’s leaking because the car will be running terribly, logging lean fault codes and you’ll hear a sucking squeaking sound from the top of the engine. 

They also have a very complicated and unconventional accessory drive setup where the serpentine belt and everything it drives, is at the transmission end of the engine. It isn’t particularly unreliable but absolutely more expensive to repair when something like the alternator over-run pulley dies or the gear-driven coupling itself gives up.  

Now to the Yamaha-developed 4.4-litre V8 which some say is the best engine ever put in a Volvo (it is definitely the best sounding).

Overall this is a really good engine but with one terrible fault.

The balance shaft bearing, which is located in the “V” of the engine, can basically swim in the water if the engine bay is exposed to excessive water, say in the case of engine bay cleaning. 

The bearing then corrodes and eventually fails, taking with it the balance shaft that then impacts the timing chain, resulting in a catastrophic engine failure. The cost of repair is often north of $15,000.

Late models feature a drainage line for any water to escape past the balance shaft bearing but it is imperative to have any S80 thoroughly inspected before purchase, especially the V8.

All of the engine variants have complicated cooling systems with many plastic parts, all of which now will be fatigued and starting to fail. 

In terms of the driveline, the Aisin 6-speed auto (in Australian models) is hugely popular and a version of it is used by just about every single manufacturer from Japan, Europe and the United States.

It is reliable and should be serviced every 60,000 km.

The All-Wheel Drive system is taken car of by a Haldex coupling, which is the same system used by VW, Audi and Land Rover and if well-serviced and maintained, is generally ok. 

 

Recalls:

  • March 2007 – Faulty Nipple PCV in Volvo XC90 and S80 models, affecting 544 units, may crack or come loose from the hose, leading to air leakage from the Crank Case Ventilation System, resulting in potential malfunction.
  • April 2009 – Volvo S80 and XC70 vehicles from 2006 to 2008 are affected by a CEM software deviation that may cause windshield wipers to malfunction, potentially activating by themselves or not responding to the driver’s command, posing a mechanical hazard
  • June 2009 – Volvo S80, XC70, V70, and XC60 vehicles, 753 units affected – A software error in the Fan Control Module (FCM) may cause the engine cooling fan to permanently stop working, leading to reduced Air Condition (AC) performance and potential engine overheating hazards.
  • September 2009 – Volvo S80, V70, and XC60 vehicles from 2007 to 2010 are affected by a fault in the fuel Pump Electronic Module (PEM) that may prevent the engine from starting or cause rough idling and stalling shortly after start-up, posing a hazard to vehicle operation. 761 units are affected.
  • June 2010 – Volvo recalls 484 units of S80, XC70, and XC60 models due to early wear on the belt tensioner, potentially causing noise and, in the worst case, leading to loss of drive and power steering assistance.
  • October 2010 – Some Volvo models (S60, S80, V70, XC60, and XC70) manufactured between 2009 and 2011 are affected by an electrical short circuit in the driver’s airbag clockspring wiring connector, potentially causing the supplemental restraint system lamp to be lit and displaying the message ‘AIRBAG SYSTEM SERVICE REQUIRED’; if the issue is ignored and an accident occurs where the driver’s airbag deployment is necessary, it may not function as intended. 1,307 units are affected.
  • November 2010 – Volvo recalls 629 units of S80, S60, V70, XC70 & XC60 due to a software calibration issue in the engine control module and transmission control module, leading to sudden engine stop during city driving, requiring additional accelerator pedal pressure for gear engagement.
  • January 2011 – Volvo issued a recall affecting 1,095 units of S80, V70, XC70 & XC60 models from 2008 to 2010 due to the engine oil level potentially exceeding the maximum level marking, leading to increased engine speed, and in the worst case, the engine may not stop running when switched off, continuing until it breaks down.
  • July 2011 – A fault has been identified in certain Volvo S80 vehicles manufactured between 2006 and 2007, affecting 79 units. The power steering return line may fail due to incorrect routing of the power steering cooling line, leading to a sudden loss of power steering assistance and posing an unreasonable risk to motor vehicle safety. In extreme cases, the power steering fluid may ignite, potentially causing an engine bay fire.
  • October 2011 – Volvo recalls 1,218 units of the S80, XC70, and XC60 models from the years 2006 to 2010 due to early wear on the auxiliary belt tensioner, which can lead to excessive noise, vehicle immobilization, and loss of power-steering assistance.
  • October 2011 – Fault in Volvo S80, XC70, and XC60 vehicles from 2006 to 2010 due to early wear on the auxiliary belt tensioner, affecting 801 units, potentially leading to excessive noise, immobilization of the vehicle, and loss of power-steering assistance.
  • August 2020 – Volvo recalls 24,961 units of S80, V70, XC70, S60, V60, and XC60 models manufactured between 2006 and 2019 due to a defect where the flexible steel cable connected to the seat belts on the outboard side of the front seats may fatigue and separate from the seat belt, potentially leading to inadequate occupant restraint in the event of an accident, posing an increased risk of serious injury or death.

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)
2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin turbo-diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)

Power:

136kW – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
175kW – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
232kW – 4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
210kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design)
151kW – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin-turbo diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)
224kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)

Torque:

400Nm – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
320Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
440Nm – 4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
400Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design)
420Nm – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin-turbo diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)
440Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed sports automatic, front-wheel drive (AWD) – D5, D5 R-Design
6-speed sports automatic, all-wheel drive (AWD)

Fuel Consumption:

7.3 – 12L / 100km

Length:

4851 – 4854mm

Width:

1861mm

Height:

1493mm

Kerb Weight:

1587 – 1884kg (4 door Sedan)

ANCAP rating:

Not available

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)
2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin turbo-diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)

Power:

136kW – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
175kW – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
232kW – 4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
210kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design)
151kW – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin-turbo diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)
224kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)

Torque:

400Nm – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
320Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
440Nm – 4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
400Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design)
420Nm – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin-turbo diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)
440Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed sports automatic, front-wheel drive (AWD) – D5, D5 R-Design
6-speed sports automatic, all-wheel drive (AWD)

Fuel Consumption:

7.3 – 12L / 100km

Length:

4851 – 4854mm

Width:

1861mm

Height:

1493mm

Kerb Weight:

1587 – 1884kg (4 door Sedan)

ANCAP rating:

Not available

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)
2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin turbo-diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)

Power:

136kW – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
175kW – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
232kW – 4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
210kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design)
151kW – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin-turbo diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)
224kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)

Torque:

400Nm – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder turbo-diesel (D5)
320Nm – 3.2 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S80)
440Nm – 4.4 litre 8-cylinder petrol (V8, V8 R-Design)
400Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design)
420Nm – 2.4 litre 5-cylinder twin-turbo diesel (D5, D5 R-Design)
440Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder turbo-petrol (T6, T6 R-Design, T6 Luxury)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed sports automatic, front-wheel drive (AWD) – D5, D5 R-Design
6-speed sports automatic, all-wheel drive (AWD)

Fuel Consumption:

7.3 – 12L / 100km

Length:

4851 – 4854mm

Width:

1861mm

Height:

1493mm

Kerb Weight:

1587 – 1884kg (4 door Sedan)

ANCAP rating:

Not available

Warranty:

3 years/unlimited km

Servicing:

15000 km / 12 months

Model range, pricing & features

Volvo S80-1

D5 (2007-2010)

Price when new: $71,950 - $79,950

Price used: $2,900 - $11,400

Standard features:

17-inch Alloy Wheels
8 Speaker Stereo
ABS
Air Cond. – Climate Control 2 Zone
Air Conditioning – Pollen Filter
Airbag – Driver
Airbag – Passenger
Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
Airbags – Head for 2nd Row Seats
Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
Alarm
Armrest – Front Centre (Shared)
Audio – Aux Input Socket (MP3/CD/Cassette)
Audio – MP3 Decoder
Audio Decoder – WMA
Blind – Rear Manual
Body Colour – Bumpers
Body Colour – Door Handles
Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Partial
Body Side Mouldings – Colour Coded
Brake Assist
CD Stacker – 6 disc In Dash/Cabin
Cargo Tie Down Hooks/Rings
Chrome Exhaust Tip(s)
Chrome Exterior Highlights
Chrome Grille Surround
Chrome Window Surrounds – Exterior
Control – Active Yaw
Control – Electronic Damper
Control – Electronic Stability
Control – Park Distance Front
Control – Park Distance Rear
Control – Traction
Disc Brakes Front Ventilated
Disc Brakes Rear Solid
Door Pockets – 1st row (Front)
Door Pockets – 2nd row (rear)
EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
Electric Seats – 1st Row (Front)
Fog Lamp/s – Rear
Fog Lamps – Front
Footwell Lamps – Front
Headlamp Washers
Headlamps – Bi-Xenon (for low & high beam)
Headlamps – See me home
Headrests – Adjustable 1st Row (Front)
Headrests – Adjustable 2nd Row x3
Headrests – Electric 2nd Row x3
Heated Seats – 1st Row
Illuminated (puddle lamps) Door Mirrors
Illuminated – Entry/Exit with Fade
Independent Rear Suspension
Keyless Start:- Key/FOB Proximity related
Leather Trim (Incl. Seats, inserts)
Lighting – Exterior Side
Map/Reading Lamps – for 1st Row
Map/Reading Lamps – for 2nd Row
Metallic Finish Interior Inserts
Multi-function Control Screen
Multi-function Steering Wheel
Park Brake – Electric
Phone Preparation
Power Door Mirrors – Folding
Power Door Mirrors – Heated
Power Steering – Speed Sensitive
Power Windows – Front & Rear
Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
Remote Boot/Hatch Release
Remote Fuel Lid Release
Seat – Rear Opening for Skis/boot access
Seatback Pockets – 1st Row (Front) seats
Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
Seatbelt – Pretensioners 2nd Row (Rear Centre)
Seatbelt – Pretensioners 2nd Row(Rear Outer seats)
Seatbelts – Lap/Sash for 5 seats
Seats – 2nd Row Split Fold
Seats – Anti-submarining 1st Row (Front)
Seats – Anti-submarining 2nd Row (Rear)
Starter Button
Sunvisor – Illuminated Vanity Mirrors Dual
Suspension – Active Ride (leans into corners)
Tacho
Trip Computer
Woodgrain – Gear Knob
Woodgrain – Inserts

2008 (MY09) updates:
Bluetooth connectivity

2009 (MY10) updates:
18-inch Alloy Wheels

T6 (2008-2013)

Price when new: $78,950 - $86,640

Price used: $4,800 - $17,000

Same equipment as the D5.

2010 (MY11) updates:
Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
Audio – Input for iPod
Brakes – Regenerative
Power Steering – Electro-Hydraulic
Sports Instruments

2013 (MY13) updates:
12 Speaker Stereo
12V Socket(s) – Auxiliary
Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt & Reach
Air Cond. – Climate Control
Air Conditioning – Sensor for Humidity
Air Conditioning – Sensor for Pollutants
Blind Spot Sensor
Brake Emergency Display – Hazard/Stoplights
Central Locking – Key Proximity
Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
Collision Mitigation – Forward (Low speed)
Control – Pedestrian Avoidance with Braking
Cruise Control – Distance Control
Cup Holders – 1st Row
DVD Player
Electric Seat – Drivers with Memory
Engine Immobiliser
Floor Mats
Headlamp – High Beam Auto Dipping
Headlamps – Active (Cornering/steering)
Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
Illuminated Vanity Mirror for Front Passenger
Lane Departure Warning
Leather Gear Knob
Leather Seats
Leather Steering Wheel
Metallic Finish Centre Console
Metallic Finish Door Handles – Interior
Multi-function Control Screen – Colour
Premium Sound System
Seat – Drivers Lumbar Adjustment Manual
Seat – Passenger Lumbar Adjustment Manual
Seatbelt – Adjustable Height 1st Row
Spare Wheel – Space Saver/Temporary
Sunvisor – Illuminated Vanity Mirror for Driver
Voice Recognition
Warning – Road Sign Display

T6 Luxury (2013-2016)

Price when new: $84,590 - $86,860

Price used: $13,300 - $26,200

In addition to T6:

10 Speaker Stereo
Armrest – Rear Centre (Shared)
Camera – Rear Vision
Chrome Exhaust Tip(s)
Chrome Exterior Highlights
Chrome Interior highlights
Chrome Window Surrounds – Exterior
Collision Warning – Forward
Cup Holders – 2nd Row
Daytime Running Lamps – LED
Digital Instrument Display – Partial
GPS (Satellite Navigation)
Leather Trimmed – Instrument Pod Cover
Power Door Mirrors – Heated
Scuff Plates (on door sills)
Woodgrain – Inserts

2014 (MY15) update:
12 Speaker Stereo
Gear Shift Paddles behind Steering Wheel
Internet Connectivity via Paired Device
Seat – Driver with Electric Lumbar
Seat – Passenger with Electric Lumbar

D5 R-Design (2009-2010)

Price when new: $81,450

Price used: $6,400 - $11,900

In addition to D5:

Floor Mats
Gauges – Coloured Dials
Metallic Finish Centre Stack/ HVAC
Metallic Finish Gear Knob
Pedals – Sports
Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
Steering Wheel – Sports
Suspension – Lowered

T6 R-Design (2009-2011)

Price when new: $81,450

Price used: $6,400 - $12,900

Same equipment as the D5 R-Design.

S80 (2007-2008)

Price when new: $75,950

Price used: $3,500 - $8,900

In addition to D5:

18-inch Alloy Wheels

V8 (2007 - 2011)

Price when new: $95,950 - $98,950

Price used: $5,000 - $14,800

In addition to V8:

12 Speaker Stereo
Bluetooth System
Digital Sound Processing
Disc Brakes Rear Ventilated
Exhaust – Stainless Steel Dual System
Premium Sound System
Speed Dependant Volume Stereo

2009 (MY10) update:
Blind Spot Sensor
Compass
Cruise Control – Distance Control
GPS (Satellite Navigation)
Lane Departure Warning

V8 R-Design

Price when new: $100,450

Price used: $8,200 - $15,000

In addition to V8:

Floor Mats
Gauges – Coloured Dials
Metallic Finish Centre Stack/ HVAC
Metallic Finish Gear Knob
Pedals – Sports
Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
Steering Wheel – Sports
Suspension – Lowered

If we’re talking the V8, if it’s in incredible condition, has a faultless history and you’re happy to give it the care and attention it requires, yes you should buy one. The V8 S80 is a unique vehicle and the right example can be a brilliant car.

However, when it comes to the non-V8 S80’s, well that’s a different story.

There’s no denying the S80 can be a wonderful car and many have been fastidiously maintained, hopefully resulting in examples on the used market being quite good.

The problem is, the list of potential mechanical issues seems to be getting longer as the car ages, as does the costs involved in repairing them.

Plus, there are plenty of other cars that offer the same skill set as the Volvo yet they tend to avoid many of the pitfalls, and coincidentally, they’re all from Japan.

Overall, while a Mazda 6, Lexus IS or even Subaru Liberty/Legacy might miss out on the Euro cool factor of the Volvo, they match it in every other way and generally offer far better reliability, superior build quality and cheaper repair costs.

If we’re talking the V8, if it’s in incredible condition, has a faultless history and you’re happy to give it the care and attention it requires, yes you should buy one. The V8 S80 is a unique vehicle and the right example can be a brilliant car.

However, when it comes to the non-V8 S80’s, well that’s a different story.

There’s no denying the S80 can be a wonderful car and many have been fastidiously maintained, hopefully resulting in examples on the used market being quite good.

The problem is, the list of potential mechanical issues seems to be getting longer as the car ages, as does the costs involved in repairing them.

Plus, there are plenty of other cars that offer the same skill set as the Volvo yet they tend to avoid many of the pitfalls, and coincidentally, they’re all from Japan.

Overall, while a Mazda 6, Lexus IS or even Subaru Liberty/Legacy might miss out on the Euro cool factor of the Volvo, they match it in every other way and generally offer far better reliability, superior build quality and cheaper repair costs.

If we’re talking the V8, if it’s in incredible condition, has a faultless history and you’re happy to give it the care and attention it requires, yes you should buy one. The V8 S80 is a unique vehicle and the right example can be a brilliant car.

However, when it comes to the non-V8 S80’s, well that’s a different story.

There’s no denying the S80 can be a wonderful car and many have been fastidiously maintained, hopefully resulting in examples on the used market being quite good.

The problem is, the list of potential mechanical issues seems to be getting longer as the car ages, as does the costs involved in repairing them.

Plus, there are plenty of other cars that offer the same skill set as the Volvo yet they tend to avoid many of the pitfalls, and coincidentally, they’re all from Japan.

Overall, while a Mazda 6, Lexus IS or even Subaru Liberty/Legacy might miss out on the Euro cool factor of the Volvo, they match it in every other way and generally offer far better reliability, superior build quality and cheaper repair costs.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of July 14, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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