Likes

  • Looks, feels, and drives like a far more expensive vehicle
  • Arguably the most unique Porsche model
  • Superb performance with genuine practicality
  • Potentially the most affordable and sensible way to get into a Porsche

Dislikes

  • Very expensive maintenance and repair costs
  • Under the skin, there’s a lot of Audi and Volkswagen going on
  • Looks are very reliant on wheels and ride height
  • How much mental and financial stress are you willing to deal with for that badge?

Stuff you should know

Released in 2009 with production wrapping up in 2016, the Porsche Panemera (model code 970) was the premium German masques first attempt at a large 5-door saloon style car and while critically acclaimed when new, visually, the Panemera was (and has remained) polarising.

During this production cycle, Porsche updated the entire Panamera range, changing mechanical packages, increased the levels of tech and features and to many, most importantly, subtlety enhanced many design aspects.

Plus, like all good Porsche models, it has been available in an array of different iterations and specs, generally all relating to what engine is powering it and what year model it is.

This may allude to confusion when trying to decipher the range so let’s make sense of this.

Firstly, you have the base spec Panamera that Porsche named simply the Panamera and it features a 6-cylinder petrol engine powering the rear wheels

Next we have the Panamera S which before the 2013 update is equipped with a 4.8-litre V8 powering the rear wheels and interestingly, these are the only Panamera available with a manual transmission, however after the 2013 update the manual was discontinued and the V8 was replaced by a twin-turbo V6

Then there’s the Panamera 4 which is ostensibly the same as the base spec Panamera only it’s four-wheel drive and the Panamera 4S which is the same as the Panamera S only it too has four wheel drive.

We then move to the more limited Panamera GTS which is basically a Panamera 4S with every possible option box ticked and more power.

Next is the Turbo which adds two turbos to the V8, adding even more power and is four-wheel drive yet if that amount of power isn’t enough, there’s the Panamera Turbo S which is a fully kitted out Turbo

If sheer thrust isn’t your highest priority, there’s the Panamera Diesel which has a turbo-diesel V6 but it only powers the rear wheels and finally the Panamera S-Hybrid and S-E Hybrid which are both rear wheel drive and powered by a supercharged V6 but add an electric motor.

In addition to this and in the tradition of being a premium European vehicle, all of these trim specs are then adjustable thanks to options and enhancement packs while quite a few owners completely customised their Panamera thanks to special order options from the factory.

What goes wrong

Exterior:

Rust. The main areas to check are the strut towers, around the rear brake light, the wheel wells and along the chassis rails especially if it has been jacked up incorrectly.

There are reports of faulty door handles, often the handle needs to be replaced.

The door lock actuators can fail and they can’t be repaired, you’ll have to replace them with OEM parts, which will be expensive.

The active rear spoiler can fail and become, well, inactive.

On examples fitted with air suspension, the air suspension can fail and understandably become an expensive problem, especially if the Panamera in question doesn’t feature an extended warranty.

There are a few reports of paint quality issues: Apparently the paint can peel or fad prematurely.

There are reports of headlight issues like moisture buildup and bulbs burning out prematurely.

Interior:

Unfortunately plenty of reports of electrical issues inside.

Owners have reported issues with the audio and navigation system including freezing or crashing and the dashboard warning lights doing their best impression of a Christmas tree.

Quite a few owners have reported issues with inaccurate readings or malfunctioning displays with the instrument cluster.

There can be air conditioning problems with owners complaining of malfunctioning vents and inadequate cooling.

Sunroof issues can occur from leaking to problems with the mechanism.

The electric window switches are a common failure but can be cheaply bought from eBay.

There are plenty of reports of rattles and squeaks due to loose components or even issues with the suspension.

Some owners have reported issues with the leather seats wearing prematurely, which may be due to low-quality materials or inadequate care.

Mechanically:

The Panamera features a range of different engine and transmission configurations, all that will vary in power and torque output depending on the specific trim model, (details are in our tech specs).

In terms of mechanical reliability, aside from some reports of fuel rails leaking, the 3.0-litre Supercharged V6 petrol is commonly regarded as being the least troublesome (so far) however it is critical to have any used Panamera checked with a full pre-purchase inspection.

The 3.0-litre Turbo Diesel however, can be quite a different story, suffering from all the usual modern common rail diesel issues such as EGR and DPF complications.

Injector seal issues are also commonly reported as are coolant and oil leaks as are turbo complications.

It should be noted, this Diesel power plant is extremely closely related to Audi and Volkswagen equivalents and was one of the engines involved in the Dieselgate emissions scandal.

The petrol V6 engines aren’t without their common concerns such as PCV and breather system complications especially related to the valve cover.

Excessive oil consumption issues are reported.

Carbon

Exterior:

Rust. The main areas to check are the strut towers, around the rear brake light, the wheel wells and along the chassis rails especially if it has been jacked up incorrectly.

There are reports of faulty door handles, often the handle needs to be replaced.

The door lock actuators can fail and they can’t be repaired, you’ll have to replace them with OEM parts, which will be expensive.

The active rear spoiler can fail and become, well, inactive.

On examples fitted with air suspension, the air suspension can fail and understandably become an expensive problem, especially if the Panamera in question doesn’t feature an extended warranty.

There are a few reports of paint quality issues: Apparently the paint can peel or fad prematurely.

There are reports of headlight issues like moisture buildup and bulbs burning out prematurely.

Interior:

Unfortunately plenty of reports of electrical issues inside.

Owners have reported issues with the audio and navigation system including freezing or crashing and the dashboard warning lights doing their best impression of a Christmas tree.

Quite a few owners have reported issues with inaccurate readings or malfunctioning displays with the instrument cluster.

There can be air conditioning problems with owners complaining of malfunctioning vents and inadequate cooling.

Sunroof issues can occur from leaking to problems with the mechanism.

The electric window switches are a common failure but can be cheaply bought from eBay.

There are plenty of reports of rattles and squeaks due to loose components or even issues with the suspension.

Some owners have reported issues with the leather seats wearing prematurely, which may be due to low-quality materials or inadequate care.

Mechanically:

The Panamera features a range of different engine and transmission configurations, all that will vary in power and torque output depending on the specific trim model, (details are in our tech specs).

In terms of mechanical reliability, aside from some reports of fuel rails leaking, the 3.0-litre Supercharged V6 petrol is commonly regarded as being the least troublesome (so far) however it is critical to have any used Panamera checked with a full pre-purchase inspection.

The 3.0-litre Turbo Diesel however, can be quite a different story, suffering from all the usual modern common rail diesel issues such as EGR and DPF complications.

Injector seal issues are also commonly reported as are coolant and oil leaks as are turbo complications.

It should be noted, this Diesel power plant is extremely closely related to Audi and Volkswagen equivalents and was one of the engines involved in the Dieselgate emissions scandal.

The petrol V6 engines aren’t without their common concerns such as PCV and breather system complications especially related to the valve cover.

Excessive oil consumption issues are reported.

Carbon build-up can be an issue thanks to direct injection. Walnut blasting the intake valves should mitigate any ongoing issues.

Like diesel engines, oil leaks are becoming more common and without attention, can result in major damage.

Ignition coil and various electronic issues are reported.

Thanks to deteriorating engine bay plastics, coolant leaks are becoming another common issue on the 970 series. The coolant distribution pipe and coolant Y pipe are cracking and begin leaking coolant.

In addition, water pump failures thanks too rubber gasket degrading and a bearing within the support shaft wearing down over time are commonly reported. If not resolved, the engine can overheat and cause serious (and very expensive) damage.

Again like diesel engines, turbocharger failures and issues are reported on petroleum power plants.

The V8 engines unfortunately can also suffer from all of these issues and failures however, the 8-cylinder seems to be more susceptible to the camshaft gear retaining bolts coming loose or in some cases, sheering off, falling into the timing chain assembly and often resulting in catastrophic engine failure.

Porsche did provide a recall to remedy this, so it is imperative to check service records to be sure the Panamera in question has been seen to.

In terms of the transmission, when fitted to 911, Boxster and Cayman models, Porsche’s PDK transmission is commonly regarded as one of the strongest and most reliable twin-clutch transmission in any production car however, in the Panamera, it is quite a different story.

The main issues tend to occur amongst the electronic and hydraulic controls with the mechatronic unit and temperature sensor being two common pain points sometimes resulting in catastrophic transmission failure.

Also thanks to the Panemera being fundamentally a road car, the dual-clutch system more often than not is asked to engage slowly, which therefore places constant load on the clutches, wearing them out. The issue here is that the clutch pack is not serviceable, requiring the entire transmission to be replaced at huge expense.

Be sure to listen and check for suspension issues and premature wear. Thanks to the Panamera weighing a substantial amount, bushes and ball joints can wear quickly and many components require full replacement.

Panamera fitted with air suspension can suffer from air strut and air compressor issues.

The top of the air strut can seize closed, resulting in the airbag itself not to filling or seizing open, then over-pressurising and splitting the bag while the air compressor can fail over time. 

General leaks within the system can also be an issue.

It’s worth noting that while these issues have been reported by many owners, with thorough and fastidious maintenance, common faults and issues can often be mitigated.

Recalls:

  • April 2010 – Fault in Porsche Panamera S, Panamera 4S, and Panamera Turbo models, affecting 113 units, where if the front seats are adjusted too far, the seat belt mount can detach from the anchoring system, compromising the restraint function of the belt system.
  • July 2018 – Seventeen units of the Porsche Panamera are affected by a manufacturing defect in the connecting links of the rear anti-roll bar, which poses an accident risk due to potential damage to surrounding suspension parts and a reduction in vehicle handling.
  • January 2019 – Due to a software error, the electric power steering in 2016-2018 Porsche Panamera vehicles may become unavailable sporadically, posing a risk of reduced steering control and increased accident or injury to occupants or other road users.
  • March 2019 – The Porsche Panamera has a software issue where the red brake wear warning light does not continuously illuminate when brake pads are worn out, increasing the risk of accidents if ignored, affecting 226 units.
  • July 2019 – The plastic sleeve of the selector lever cable in certain Porsche Cayenne and Panamera models from 2002 to 2010 may break, potentially preventing the transmission from shifting into park mode and increasing the risk of unintentional vehicle roll-off, affecting 2,635 units.
  • September 2019 – Out-of-specification capacitors in the airbag control unit of certain Porsche models (Panamera, 911, Boxster, Cayman) from 2015-2016 can lead to unexpected airbag deployment or failure to deploy in an accident, posing a risk of injury to occupants and other road users. 348 units are affected.
  • November 2019 – Some Porsche Panamera and Cayenne models produced from 2016 to 2019, with a total of 2,348 affected units, have a defect where the ‘brake pad worn’ warning message may not be permanently displayed, potentially leading to drivers not being informed about worn brake pads and increasing the risk of accidents or serious injuries.
  • February 2023 – Moisture leakage in the additional coolant pump’s control unit of Porsche Panamera (97A, 97B, 97C) models from 2015 to 2021 may lead to an electrical short circuit and vehicle fire, posing a risk of injury or death to occupants, road users, and bystanders.

 

Exterior:

Rust. The main areas to check are the strut towers, around the rear brake light, the wheel wells and along the chassis rails especially if it has been jacked up incorrectly.

There are reports of faulty door handles, often the handle needs to be replaced.

The door lock actuators can fail and they can’t be repaired, you’ll have to replace them with OEM parts, which will be expensive.

The active rear spoiler can fail and become, well, inactive.

On examples fitted with air suspension, the air suspension can fail and understandably become an expensive problem, especially if the Panamera in question doesn’t feature an extended warranty.

There are a few reports of paint quality issues: Apparently the paint can peel or fad prematurely.

There are reports of headlight issues like moisture buildup and bulbs burning out prematurely.

Interior:

Unfortunately plenty of reports of electrical issues inside.

Owners have reported issues with the audio and navigation system including freezing or crashing and the dashboard warning lights doing their best impression of a Christmas tree.

Quite a few owners have reported issues with inaccurate readings or malfunctioning displays with the instrument cluster.

There can be air conditioning problems with owners complaining of malfunctioning vents and inadequate cooling.

Sunroof issues can occur from leaking to problems with the mechanism.

The electric window switches are a common failure but can be cheaply bought from eBay.

There are plenty of reports of rattles and squeaks due to loose components or even issues with the suspension.

Some owners have reported issues with the leather seats wearing prematurely, which may be due to low-quality materials or inadequate care.

Mechanically:

The Panamera features a range of different engine and transmission configurations, all that will vary in power and torque output depending on the specific trim model, (details are in our tech specs).

In terms of mechanical reliability, aside from some reports of fuel rails leaking, the 3.0-litre Supercharged V6 petrol is commonly regarded as being the least troublesome (so far) however it is critical to have any used Panamera checked with a full pre-purchase inspection.

The 3.0-litre Turbo Diesel however, can be quite a different story, suffering from all the usual modern common rail diesel issues such as EGR and DPF complications.

Injector seal issues are also commonly reported as are coolant and oil leaks as are turbo complications.

It should be noted, this Diesel power plant is extremely closely related to Audi and Volkswagen equivalents and was one of the engines involved in the Dieselgate emissions scandal.

The petrol V6 engines aren’t without their common concerns such as PCV and breather system complications especially related to the valve cover.

Excessive oil consumption issues are reported.

Carbon build-up can be an issue thanks to direct injection. Walnut blasting the intake valves should mitigate any ongoing issues.

Like diesel engines, oil leaks are becoming more common and without attention, can result in major damage.

Ignition coil and various electronic issues are reported.

Thanks to deteriorating engine bay plastics, coolant leaks are becoming another common issue on the 970 series. The coolant distribution pipe and coolant Y pipe are cracking and begin leaking coolant.

In addition, water pump failures thanks too rubber gasket degrading and a bearing within the support shaft wearing down over time are commonly reported. If not resolved, the engine can overheat and cause serious (and very expensive) damage.

Again like diesel engines, turbocharger failures and issues are reported on petroleum power plants.

The V8 engines unfortunately can also suffer from all of these issues and failures however, the 8-cylinder seems to be more susceptible to the camshaft gear retaining bolts coming loose or in some cases, sheering off, falling into the timing chain assembly and often resulting in catastrophic engine failure.

Porsche did provide a recall to remedy this, so it is imperative to check service records to be sure the Panamera in question has been seen to.

In terms of the transmission, when fitted to 911, Boxster and Cayman models, Porsche’s PDK transmission is commonly regarded as one of the strongest and most reliable twin-clutch transmission in any production car however, in the Panamera, it is quite a different story.

The main issues tend to occur amongst the electronic and hydraulic controls with the mechatronic unit and temperature sensor being two common pain points sometimes resulting in catastrophic transmission failure.

Also thanks to the Panemera being fundamentally a road car, the dual-clutch system more often than not is asked to engage slowly, which therefore places constant load on the clutches, wearing them out. The issue here is that the clutch pack is not serviceable, requiring the entire transmission to be replaced at huge expense.

Be sure to listen and check for suspension issues and premature wear. Thanks to the Panamera weighing a substantial amount, bushes and ball joints can wear quickly and many components require full replacement.

Panamera fitted with air suspension can suffer from air strut and air compressor issues.

The top of the air strut can seize closed, resulting in the airbag itself not to filling or seizing open, then over-pressurising and splitting the bag while the air compressor can fail over time. 

General leaks within the system can also be an issue.

It’s worth noting that while these issues have been reported by many owners, with thorough and fastidious maintenance, common faults and issues can often be mitigated.

Recalls:

  • April 2010 – Fault in Porsche Panamera S, Panamera 4S, and Panamera Turbo models, affecting 113 units, where if the front seats are adjusted too far, the seat belt mount can detach from the anchoring system, compromising the restraint function of the belt system.
  • July 2018 – Seventeen units of the Porsche Panamera are affected by a manufacturing defect in the connecting links of the rear anti-roll bar, which poses an accident risk due to potential damage to surrounding suspension parts and a reduction in vehicle handling.
  • January 2019 – Due to a software error, the electric power steering in 2016-2018 Porsche Panamera vehicles may become unavailable sporadically, posing a risk of reduced steering control and increased accident or injury to occupants or other road users.
  • March 2019 – The Porsche Panamera has a software issue where the red brake wear warning light does not continuously illuminate when brake pads are worn out, increasing the risk of accidents if ignored, affecting 226 units.
  • July 2019 – The plastic sleeve of the selector lever cable in certain Porsche Cayenne and Panamera models from 2002 to 2010 may break, potentially preventing the transmission from shifting into park mode and increasing the risk of unintentional vehicle roll-off, affecting 2,635 units.
  • September 2019 – Out-of-specification capacitors in the airbag control unit of certain Porsche models (Panamera, 911, Boxster, Cayman) from 2015-2016 can lead to unexpected airbag deployment or failure to deploy in an accident, posing a risk of injury to occupants and other road users. 348 units are affected.
  • November 2019 – Some Porsche Panamera and Cayenne models produced from 2016 to 2019, with a total of 2,348 affected units, have a defect where the ‘brake pad worn’ warning message may not be permanently displayed, potentially leading to drivers not being informed about worn brake pads and increasing the risk of accidents or serious injuries.
  • February 2023 – Moisture leakage in the additional coolant pump’s control unit of Porsche Panamera (97A, 97B, 97C) models from 2015 to 2021 may lead to an electrical short circuit and vehicle fire, posing a risk of injury or death to occupants, road users, and bystanders.

 

Should you buy it?

If you should buy a 970 Porsche Panamera comes down to which of two groups you belong to.

On the one hand, if you have lots of money and are a little bit mad, why not, buy it as logic most likely bores you?

Chances are you’ve worked hard and have saved your cash or maybe you’re happy to put yourself in scary amounts of debt, and we thank you for being so irresponsible when it comes to the love for high-maintenance cars like the Panamera.

Cars like the Panamera aren’t about logic, they’re about passion and all the wonderful feelings and emotions that are triggered when you own and drive a car like the big Porsche and it wasn’t for people like you, special cars like the 970 would vanish from our roads and our lives.

Financially you’re potentially an idiot for buying one, but you’re an awesome idiot and we thank you because it’s people like you that keep the car industry exciting.

However, on the other hand, if you’re on a tight budget, have less money, and are quite sensible, god no, do not a Porsche Panamera!

You can’t afford to keep the bloody thing on the road, we know it’s wonderful and yes when you ignore what might go wrong and the costs to repair it, it can seem like great value plus it’s unique and does everything so incredibly well but deep down, you know it might send you broke and you know taking risks like

If you should buy a 970 Porsche Panamera comes down to which of two groups you belong to.

On the one hand, if you have lots of money and are a little bit mad, why not, buy it as logic most likely bores you?

Chances are you’ve worked hard and have saved your cash or maybe you’re happy to put yourself in scary amounts of debt, and we thank you for being so irresponsible when it comes to the love for high-maintenance cars like the Panamera.

Cars like the Panamera aren’t about logic, they’re about passion and all the wonderful feelings and emotions that are triggered when you own and drive a car like the big Porsche and it wasn’t for people like you, special cars like the 970 would vanish from our roads and our lives.

Financially you’re potentially an idiot for buying one, but you’re an awesome idiot and we thank you because it’s people like you that keep the car industry exciting.

However, on the other hand, if you’re on a tight budget, have less money, and are quite sensible, god no, do not a Porsche Panamera!

You can’t afford to keep the bloody thing on the road, we know it’s wonderful and yes when you ignore what might go wrong and the costs to repair it, it can seem like great value plus it’s unique and does everything so incredibly well but deep down, you know it might send you broke and you know taking risks like this will stress you out once the adrenaline dies down, please, do not buy it.

Should you buy it?

If you should buy a 970 Porsche Panamera comes down to which of two groups you belong to.

On the one hand, if you have lots of money and are a little bit mad, why not, buy it as logic most likely bores you?

Chances are you’ve worked hard and have saved your cash or maybe you’re happy to put yourself in scary amounts of debt, and we thank you for being so irresponsible when it comes to the love for high-maintenance cars like the Panamera.

Cars like the Panamera aren’t about logic, they’re about passion and all the wonderful feelings and emotions that are triggered when you own and drive a car like the big Porsche and it wasn’t for people like you, special cars like the 970 would vanish from our roads and our lives.

Financially you’re potentially an idiot for buying one, but you’re an awesome idiot and we thank you because it’s people like you that keep the car industry exciting.

However, on the other hand, if you’re on a tight budget, have less money, and are quite sensible, god no, do not a Porsche Panamera!

You can’t afford to keep the bloody thing on the road, we know it’s wonderful and yes when you ignore what might go wrong and the costs to repair it, it can seem like great value plus it’s unique and does everything so incredibly well but deep down, you know it might send you broke and you know taking risks like this will stress you out once the adrenaline dies down, please, do not buy it.

Need help with finance?

What is the car's build year?

2020

Loan Amount

$5,000

Finance estimate ~

$30

Per week*

8.49%

Comparison rate p.a#

Models, pricing & features

Porsche Panamera-15

Panamera/4 (2010-2016)

Price when new: $193,000 - $216,800

Price used: $38,200 - $103,200

Standard features:

12V Socket(s) – Auxiliary
14 Speaker Stereo
18-inch Alloy Wheels
ABS (Antilock Brakes)
Active Noise Cancellation
Adjustable Steering Col. – Tilt & Reach
Air Cond. – Climate Control 2 Zone
Air Conditioning – Pollen Filter
Air Conditioning – Rear
Air Conditioning – Sensor for Pollutants
Airbag – Driver
Airbag – Knee Driver
Airbag – Knee Passenger
Airbag – Passenger
Airbags – Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
Airbags – Head for 2nd Row Seats
Airbags – Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front)
Alarm with Motion Sensor
Ambient Lighting – Interior
Armrest – Front Centre (Shared)
Armrest – Rear Centre (Shared)
Audio – Aux Input Socket (MP3/CD/Cassette)
Audio – Aux Input USB Socket
Audio – Input for iPod
Audio – MP3 Decoder
Automatic Brake Differential (4 only)
Bluetooth System
Body Colour – Bumpers
Body Colour – Door Handles
Body Colour – Exterior Mirrors Full
Bonnet – Active Safety
Brake Assist
Brake Emergency Display – Hazard/Stoplights
Calipers – Front 6 Spot
Calipers – Rear 4 Spot
Cargo Blind – Rear
Cargo Net
Central Locking – Remote/Keyless
Centre Console – Extended
Chrome Exhaust Tip(s)
Colour Display Screen – Front
Control – Electronic Damper
Control – Electronic Stability
Control – Park Distance Front
Control – Park Distance Rear
Courtesy Lamps – in Doors Front
Courtesy Lamps – in Doors Rear
Cruise Control
Cup Holders – 1st Row
Cup Holders – 2nd Row
DVD Player – 6 Disc Stacker
Disc Brakes Front Vented Drilled/Grooved
Disc Brakes Rear Vented Drilled/Grooved
Door Pockets – 1st row (Front)
Door Pockets – 2nd row (rear)
Drive By Wire (Electronic Throttle Control)
Drive-by-Wire (ETC) – Selectable Multi Mode
Driving Lamps
EBD (Electronic Brake Force Distribution)
Electric Seat – Drivers with Memory
Electric Seats:- 1st Row (Front) with Memories
Engine – Stop Start System (When at idle)
Engine Immobiliser
Exhaust – Stainless Steel Dual System
Fog Lamps – Front
Footwell Lamps – Front
Footwell Lamps – Rear
GPS (Satellite Navigation)
Gear Shift Paddles behind Steering Wheel
Gloss Finish Inserts in Centre Console
Gloss Finish Inserts in Dash Board
Gloss Finish Inserts in Doors
Glovebox – Cooled
Headlamp Washers
Headlamps – Bi-Xenon (for low & high beam)
Headlamps – Electric Level Adjustment
Headlamps – See me home
Heat Insulated – Side Windows
Heat Insulated – Windscreen
Heated Washer Jets
Illuminated (puddle lamps) Door Mirrors
Inbuilt Harddisk Drive
Independent Front Suspension
Independent Rear Suspension
Intermittent Wipers – Variable
Leather – Armrest Front
Leather Gear Knob
Leather Steering Wheel
Leather Trim – Partial
Map/Reading Lamps – for 1st Row
Map/Reading Lamps – for 2nd Row
Metallic Finish Air Vents (interior)
Metallic Finish Dash Board
Metallic Finish Door Handles – Interior
Metallic Finish Door Inserts
Metallic Finish Instrument Surrounds
Multi-function Control Screen – Colour
Multi-function Steering Wheel
Navigation System – DVD Audio
Navigation System – DVD Video
On-board Computer
Park Brake – Electric
Phone Preparation
Power – Boot/Tailgate
Power Door Mirrors – Anti Glare
Power Door Mirrors – Folding
Power Door Mirrors – Heated
Power Door Mirrors – with Memory
Power Steering – Active (Ratio Speed related)
Power Windows – Front & Rear
Premium Sound System
Rain Sensor (Auto wipers)
Rear View Mirror – Electric Anti Glare
Rear Windows – Extra Dark/Privacy
Remote Boot/Hatch Release
Remote Fuel Lid Release
Roof Console – Front Multi-function
Scuff Plates (on door sills)
Seatback Pockets – 1st Row (Front) seats
Seatbelt – Adjustable Height 1st Row
Seatbelt – Load Limiters 1st Row (Front)
Seatbelt – Pretensioners 1st Row (Front)
Seatbelt – Pretensioners 2nd Row(Rear Outer seats)
Seats – 2nd Row (2 position)
Seats – 2nd Row (Rear) Flat Folding
Seats – 2nd Row Split Fold
Speed Dependant Volume Stereo
Spoiler – Rear Electric
Storage Compartment – Centre Console 1st Row
Subwoofer
Sunroof – Electric
Sunvisor – Illuminated Vanity Mirrors Dual
Suspension – Sports
Tail Lamps – LED
Trip Computer
Vented – Guards Front
Water Repellant – Side Windows
Central Locking – Key Proximity
Headlamps – Active (Cornering/steering)
Starter Button – Key/Fob Proximity
Tyre Pressure Monitoring – with logging/display

Diesel (2011-2016)

Price when new: $194,900 - $208,400

Price used: $37,900 - $80,100

In addition to Panamera/4:

Airbags – Side for 2nd Row Occupants (rear)
Automatic Brake Differential
CD Player
Camera – Rear Vision
Chrome Rear Garnish
Control – Traction
Control – Trailer Sway
DVD Player
Diffuser – Rear
Fog Lamp/s – Rear
Gear Shift Buttons on Steering Wheel
Headlamps Automatic (light sensitive)
Hill Holder
Over-head Centre Console – Front
Paint – Metallic
Daytime Running Lamps – LED
Power Steering – Variable Ratio (more lock faster)
Air Conditioning – Charcoal Filter (Odour Reducer)
Aluminium – Bonnet
Aluminium – Doors
Aluminium – Front Guards
Electric Seats – 1st Row (Front)
Fog Lamp/s – Rear LED
Heated Seats – 1st Row
Active Torque Transfer System
Diff lock(s)
Differential Rear:- Active/Electronic
Storage Compartment – In Cargo Area

Edition/Diesel Edition/4 Edition (2015-2016)

Price when new: $204,200

Price used: $74,900 - $98,500

In addition to Panamera/4:

19-inch Alloy Wheels
Adjustable Steering Column – Power & Memory
Camera – Front Vision
Camera – Side Vision
Headlamp – High Beam Auto Dipping
Headlamps – LED
Leather Trim – (Incl. Seats, inserts) Two Tone
Radio – Digital (DAB+)
Seats – Embossed
Suspension – Active Ride (leans into corners)
Suspension – Air
Suspension – Auto Levelling

S/4S (2009-2016)

Price when new: $270,200 - $301,100

Price used: $38,700 - $146,600

In addition to Panamera/4:

Leather Trim (Incl. Seats, inserts)
Leather Trimmed – Centre Console
Seat – Driver with Electric Lumbar
Seat – Passenger with Electric Lumbar
Voice Recognition
Level Ride Suspension

4S adds:

Metallic Finish Interior Inserts
Long Range Fuel Tank

S E-Hybrid/S-Hybrid (2011-2016)

Price when new: $285,300 - $300,500

Price used: $56,00 - $103,000

In addition to S:

11 Speaker Stereo
Brakes – Regenerative
Calipers – Painted Front
Calipers – Painted Rear
Chrome Window Surrounds – Exterior
Power Door Closing Aid
Power Steering – Speed Sensitive
Rear Wiper/Washer
Seat – Ventilated Drivers Side
Seat – Ventilated Passenger Side

GTS (2012-2016)

Price when new: $315,300 - $320,100

Price used: $68,000 - $155,900

In addition to S:

Adaptive Accelerator (for driving style)
Control – Corner Braking
Control – Rollover Stability
Electronic Differential Lock
Headlamps – Blacked Out Surrounds
Headlamps – Corner (Fixed)
Launch Control
Memory Pack – Driver (most vehicle electrics)
Seat – Bolsters Active for Driver
Seat – Bolsters Active for Passenger
Seat – Ventilated Rear
Sports Exhaust
Sports Seats – 1st Row (Front)
Steering Wheel – Sports
Stopwatch – Analogue
Stopwatch – Digital
Suede Look – Headlining
Suspension – Lowered
Gloss Finish Window Surrounds – Exterior
Carbon Fibre – Interior Inserts
Disc Brakes Front Composite/Ceramic
Side Skirts
Suede Look – Seats Partial
Wheel Centre Cap with Logo

Turbo (2009-2016)

Price when new: $364,900 - $383,400

Price used: $53,600 - $186,700

In addition to GTS:

Heated Seats – 2nd Row
Suspension – Air Electronic
Keyless Start:- Key/FOB Proximity related
Woodgrain – Inserts
20″ Alloy Wheels
Leather Seats
Leather Trimmed – Door sills
Leather Trimmed – Switch Panel
Blind Spot Sensor

Turbo S (2011-2016)

Price when new: $440,200 - $444,460

Price used: $81,400 - $216,500

In addition to Turbo:

Polished Wheels
Disc Brakes Rear Composite/Ceramic
Driving Mode – Selectable
Performance Brakes

Tech specs

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S, Turbo, Turbo S, GTS)
3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel, S, 4S, Diesel Edition)
3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S Hybrid)
3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S E-Hybrid)

Power:

294kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
368kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
220kW – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4)
405kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)
184kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel)
245kW – 3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder hybrid (S Hybrid)
316kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
228kW – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
245kW – 3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol=hybrid (S E-Hybrid)
309kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
324kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
382kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
221kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel, Diesel Edition)
419kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)

Torque:

500Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
700Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
400Nm – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
750Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)
550Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel)
440Nm – 3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S Hybrid)
520Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
440Nm – 3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder hybrid (S

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S, Turbo, Turbo S, GTS)
3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel, S, 4S, Diesel Edition)
3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S Hybrid)
3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S E-Hybrid)

Power:

294kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
368kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
220kW – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4)
405kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)
184kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel)
245kW – 3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder hybrid (S Hybrid)
316kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
228kW – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
245kW – 3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol=hybrid (S E-Hybrid)
309kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
324kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
382kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
221kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel, Diesel Edition)
419kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)

Torque:

500Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
700Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
400Nm – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
750Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)
550Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel)
440Nm – 3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S Hybrid)
520Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
440Nm – 3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder hybrid (S E-Hybrid)
520Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
650Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel Edition, Diesel)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed manual, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – S
7-speed sports dual-clutch automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Panamera, S
7-speed sports dual-clutch automatic, all-wheel drive (AWD) – 4, 4 Edition, 4S, Turbo, Turbo S, GTS
8-speed sports automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Diesel, S Hybrid, S E-Hybrid, Diesel Edition

Fuel Consumption:

3.1 – 12.7L / 100km

Length:

4970 – 5015mm

Width:

1931mm

Height:

1408 – 1418mm

Kerb Weight:

1760 – 2095kg (4 door Sedan)

Body Style:

4-door sedan

Engines:

4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S, Turbo, Turbo S, GTS)
3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel, S, 4S, Diesel Edition)
3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S Hybrid)
3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S E-Hybrid)

Power:

294kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
368kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
220kW – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4)
405kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)
184kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel)
245kW – 3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder hybrid (S Hybrid)
316kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
228kW – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
245kW – 3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol=hybrid (S E-Hybrid)
309kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
324kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
382kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
221kW – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel, Diesel Edition)
419kW – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)

Torque:

500Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
700Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo)
400Nm – 3.6 litre 6-cylinder petrol (Panamera, 4, Edition, 4 Edition)
750Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (Turbo S)
550Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel)
440Nm – 3.0 litre/34kW Hybrid 6-cylinder petrol-hybrid (S Hybrid)
520Nm – 4.8 litre 8-cylinder petrol (GTS)
440Nm – 3.0 litre/70kW Hybrid 6-cylinder hybrid (S E-Hybrid)
520Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder petrol (S, 4S)
650Nm – 3.0 litre 6-cylinder diesel (Diesel Edition, Diesel)

Transmission & Drivetrains:

6-speed manual, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – S
7-speed sports dual-clutch automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Panamera, S
7-speed sports dual-clutch automatic, all-wheel drive (AWD) – 4, 4 Edition, 4S, Turbo, Turbo S, GTS
8-speed sports automatic, rear-wheel drive (RWD) – Diesel, S Hybrid, S E-Hybrid, Diesel Edition

Fuel Consumption:

3.1 – 12.7L / 100km

Length:

4970 – 5015mm

Width:

1931mm

Height:

1408 – 1418mm

Kerb Weight:

1760 – 2095kg (4 door Sedan)

Warranty & servicing

Warranty:

3 years/unlimited km

Servicing:

15,000 km / 12 months

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Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of June 30, 2023.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

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