Pros

  • Private Jet levels of accommodation.
  • Shares mechanicals with locally available Toyota models.
  • Exceptional build quality and reliability.
  • Arguably the pick of people movers, especially in Hybrid form.

Cons

  • The looks aren’t to everyone’s taste.
  • Certain grey importers can be dishonest, to say the least.
  • Not as cool or sexy as a 7-seat SUV in terms of image.
  • V6 models can be quite thirsty.

Verdict

Before we answer the should you buy question, if you’re seriously considering buying a people mover over a 7-seat SUV, congratulations, it’s great to see logic wins over image for you.

But, should you buy the Vellfire or Alphard pair? Very possibly.

The Vellfire and Alphard both make so much...

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When it comes to the challenging situation of needing to transport an ever increasing population of children in your life, some seem to fight this reality they’ve created for themselves and buy a 7-seat SUV and yes the SUV option might be the sexier option compared to a people mover but things can quickly turn disastrous as you run out of actual cargo space as you pump out more kids.

However, others embrace the fact that it’s far more sensible to make a logical choice and buy a people mover.

Not only are the Toyota Vellfire and Alphard possibly THE sensible choice for transporting a family, they are often the go to set of wheels for celebrities, politicians and heads of industry in Japan, Singapore and Hong Kong. They are relatively rare here in Australia, but they are hugely popular across Asia.

While ostensibly twins, the Vellfire is marketed as the sportier version of the luxurious Alphard, not that the Vellfire isn’t luxurious in anyway, both could convincingly pass as private jets on four wheels..

The Vellfire and Alphard have existed across different generations since the early 2000’s however this cheat focusses on the 2015 to 2023 AH30 range and like any good Japanese domestic market car, it is available in a confusing range of different trim specs, all of which can vary in what they offer depending on if they are pre or post the 2018 update, through to even what dealership sold the particular Vellfire or Alphard in

When it comes to the challenging situation of needing to transport an ever increasing population of children in your life, some seem to fight this reality they’ve created for themselves and buy a 7-seat SUV and yes the SUV option might be the sexier option compared to a people mover but things can quickly turn disastrous as you run out of actual cargo space as you pump out more kids.

However, others embrace the fact that it’s far more sensible to make a logical choice and buy a people mover.

Not only are the Toyota Vellfire and Alphard possibly THE sensible choice for transporting a family, they are often the go to set of wheels for celebrities, politicians and heads of industry in Japan, Singapore and Hong Kong. They are relatively rare here in Australia, but they are hugely popular across Asia.

While ostensibly twins, the Vellfire is marketed as the sportier version of the luxurious Alphard, not that the Vellfire isn’t luxurious in anyway, both could convincingly pass as private jets on four wheels..

The Vellfire and Alphard have existed across different generations since the early 2000’s however this cheat focusses on the 2015 to 2023 AH30 range and like any good Japanese domestic market car, it is available in a confusing range of different trim specs, all of which can vary in what they offer depending on if they are pre or post the 2018 update, through to even what dealership sold the particular Vellfire or Alphard in the first place.

For example, at the time of writing, there are more than 15 different trim specs available across the Vellfire and Alphard range, and Australia doesn’t currently receive all the possible trim variations.

Aside from the the convoluted trim spec options, engine choices are far easier to navigate, all are petrol and there is a<span class=”Apple-converted-space”>  </span>choice of 3.5-litre V6, 2.5-litre 4-cylinder or 2.5-litre hybrid, all running various forms of automatic transmissions driving the front or all 4-wheels depending on those confusing trim specs.

Even in terms of accomodation, you’ll even have a choice of seating options between providing pews for 6, 7 and even 8, again depending on the model.

When it comes to the challenging situation of needing to transport an ever increasing population of children in your life, some seem to fight this reality they’ve created for themselves and buy a 7-seat SUV and yes the SUV option might be the sexier option compared to a people mover but things can quickly turn disastrous as you run out of actual cargo space as you pump out more kids.

However, others embrace the fact that it’s far more sensible to make a logical choice and buy a people mover.

Not only are the Toyota Vellfire and Alphard possibly THE sensible choice for transporting a family, they are often the go to set of wheels for celebrities, politicians and heads of industry in Japan, Singapore and Hong Kong. They are relatively rare here in Australia, but they are hugely popular across Asia.

While ostensibly twins, the Vellfire is marketed as the sportier version of the luxurious Alphard, not that the Vellfire isn’t luxurious in anyway, both could convincingly pass as private jets on four wheels..

The Vellfire and Alphard have existed across different generations since the early 2000’s however this cheat focusses on the 2015 to 2023 AH30 range and like any good Japanese domestic market car, it is available in a confusing range of different trim specs, all of which can vary in what they offer depending on if they are pre or post the 2018 update, through to even what dealership sold the particular Vellfire or Alphard in the first place.

For example, at the time of writing, there are more than 15 different trim specs available across the Vellfire and Alphard range, and Australia doesn’t currently receive all the possible trim variations.

Aside from the the convoluted trim spec options, engine choices are far easier to navigate, all are petrol and there is a<span class=”Apple-converted-space”>  </span>choice of 3.5-litre V6, 2.5-litre 4-cylinder or 2.5-litre hybrid, all running various forms of automatic transmissions driving the front or all 4-wheels depending on those confusing trim specs.

Even in terms of accomodation, you’ll even have a choice of seating options between providing pews for 6, 7 and even 8, again depending on the model.

Exterior:

Toyotas, especially if uncared for or if left out in the sun can suffer from paint (especially white paint) fading, cracking and peeling.

Equally as concerning is that with how large the panels are, a full quality respray won’t be cheap.

There have been some reports of parking sensors around the car failing to identify objects.

Some owner’s have reported issues in regard to the rear sliding door, some of which consist of it making an excessive amount of noise when opening/closing it, or they just fail entirely.

The Sunroof can suffer from a similar fate of not opening/closing and there have been minor reports of leaks as well.

Owner’s have also reported cases of excessive wind noise when traveling at higher speeds. Although, it is a box on wheels, surely wind noise is to be expected?

Interior:

There are a few reports of air conditioning issues. Problems can range from weak airflow to warm air coming from the vents. This could be due to a variety of issues, such as a clogged air filter or a refrigerant leak.

Some owners have reported issues with the Alphard’s infotainment system, these issues can range from a frozen or unresponsive screen to connectivity problems with Bluetooth or USB, or even glitches in the navigation system. However, this isn’t exclusive to the Alphard or Vellfire, all Toyota’s can have infotainment issues.

Also, with the Alphard and Vellfire being so jam packed with tech and features, there have been reports of the battery draining excessively quickly.

Mechanically:

The 4-cylinder 2AR-FE and hybrid 2AR-FXE are all round Toyota workhorse engines that are in a host of different Toyota and Lexus models and aside from the occasional water pump and coil pack, both have very few issues.

The 6-cylinder 2GR-FE is an engine that been around for years and statistically one of the most reliable engines of all time.

The current versions are more complex than the earlier examples, but again, incredibly reliable.

As for the Hybrid, Toyota have done a great job here as well with no serious common problems to look out for. Although it is important that the cooling vents don’t get covered over with fluff and life’s filth because that can cause the batteries to overheat and eventually fail.

All the transmission options, the 6-speed, the 8-speed and the CVT in the hybrid are again amongst the most reliable transmissions in this class (or any class for that matter) and if they’re serviced properly are unlikely to give you any problems.

Servicing is cheap. There are no timing belts to worry about and the timing chains (unlike so many other modern engines) rarely cause any dramas, especially if well serviced.

As

Exterior:

Toyotas, especially if uncared for or if left out in the sun can suffer from paint (especially white paint) fading, cracking and peeling.

Equally as concerning is that with how large the panels are, a full quality respray won’t be cheap.

There have been some reports of parking sensors around the car failing to identify objects.

Some owner’s have reported issues in regard to the rear sliding door, some of which consist of it making an excessive amount of noise when opening/closing it, or they just fail entirely.

The Sunroof can suffer from a similar fate of not opening/closing and there have been minor reports of leaks as well.

Owner’s have also reported cases of excessive wind noise when traveling at higher speeds. Although, it is a box on wheels, surely wind noise is to be expected?

Interior:

There are a few reports of air conditioning issues. Problems can range from weak airflow to warm air coming from the vents. This could be due to a variety of issues, such as a clogged air filter or a refrigerant leak.

Some owners have reported issues with the Alphard’s infotainment system, these issues can range from a frozen or unresponsive screen to connectivity problems with Bluetooth or USB, or even glitches in the navigation system. However, this isn’t exclusive to the Alphard or Vellfire, all Toyota’s can have infotainment issues.

Also, with the Alphard and Vellfire being so jam packed with tech and features, there have been reports of the battery draining excessively quickly.

Mechanically:

The 4-cylinder 2AR-FE and hybrid 2AR-FXE are all round Toyota workhorse engines that are in a host of different Toyota and Lexus models and aside from the occasional water pump and coil pack, both have very few issues.

The 6-cylinder 2GR-FE is an engine that been around for years and statistically one of the most reliable engines of all time.

The current versions are more complex than the earlier examples, but again, incredibly reliable.

As for the Hybrid, Toyota have done a great job here as well with no serious common problems to look out for. Although it is important that the cooling vents don’t get covered over with fluff and life’s filth because that can cause the batteries to overheat and eventually fail.

All the transmission options, the 6-speed, the 8-speed and the CVT in the hybrid are again amongst the most reliable transmissions in this class (or any class for that matter) and if they’re serviced properly are unlikely to give you any problems.

Servicing is cheap. There are no timing belts to worry about and the timing chains (unlike so many other modern engines) rarely cause any dramas, especially if well serviced.

As we find time and time again with used cars, generally anything from Toyota has a fairly high threshold for neglect unlike some other manufactures (yes we’re looking at you Euro), regular servicing is still a must and if kept up to date should give very little trouble.

Exterior:

Toyotas, especially if uncared for or if left out in the sun can suffer from paint (especially white paint) fading, cracking and peeling.

Equally as concerning is that with how large the panels are, a full quality respray won’t be cheap.

There have been some reports of parking sensors around the car failing to identify objects.

Some owner’s have reported issues in regard to the rear sliding door, some of which consist of it making an excessive amount of noise when opening/closing it, or they just fail entirely.

The Sunroof can suffer from a similar fate of not opening/closing and there have been minor reports of leaks as well.

Owner’s have also reported cases of excessive wind noise when traveling at higher speeds. Although, it is a box on wheels, surely wind noise is to be expected?

Interior:

There are a few reports of air conditioning issues. Problems can range from weak airflow to warm air coming from the vents. This could be due to a variety of issues, such as a clogged air filter or a refrigerant leak.

Some owners have reported issues with the Alphard’s infotainment system, these issues can range from a frozen or unresponsive screen to connectivity problems with Bluetooth or USB, or even glitches in the navigation system. However, this isn’t exclusive to the Alphard or Vellfire, all Toyota’s can have infotainment issues.

Also, with the Alphard and Vellfire being so jam packed with tech and features, there have been reports of the battery draining excessively quickly.

Mechanically:

The 4-cylinder 2AR-FE and hybrid 2AR-FXE are all round Toyota workhorse engines that are in a host of different Toyota and Lexus models and aside from the occasional water pump and coil pack, both have very few issues.

The 6-cylinder 2GR-FE is an engine that been around for years and statistically one of the most reliable engines of all time.

The current versions are more complex than the earlier examples, but again, incredibly reliable.

As for the Hybrid, Toyota have done a great job here as well with no serious common problems to look out for. Although it is important that the cooling vents don’t get covered over with fluff and life’s filth because that can cause the batteries to overheat and eventually fail.

All the transmission options, the 6-speed, the 8-speed and the CVT in the hybrid are again amongst the most reliable transmissions in this class (or any class for that matter) and if they’re serviced properly are unlikely to give you any problems.

Servicing is cheap. There are no timing belts to worry about and the timing chains (unlike so many other modern engines) rarely cause any dramas, especially if well serviced.

As we find time and time again with used cars, generally anything from Toyota has a fairly high threshold for neglect unlike some other manufactures (yes we’re looking at you Euro), regular servicing is still a must and if kept up to date should give very little trouble.

Body Style:

5-door people mover (minivan/MPV)

Engines:

2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
3.5 litre V6 petrol
2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Power:

134kW – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
206kW – 3.5 litre V6 petrol
221kW – 3.5 litre V6 petrol (from 2018)
112/105kW (engine/electric motor) – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Torque:

235Nm – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
344Nm – 3.5 litre V6 petrol
361Nm – 3.5 litre V6 petrol (from 2018)
206/270Nm (engine/electric motor) – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Transmission & Drivetrains:

7-speed continuously variable transmission (CVT), front-wheel drive (FWD)
7-speed continuously variable transmission (CVT), four-wheel drive (4WD)
6-speed automatic, front-wheel drive (FWD)
6-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)
e-CVT, four-wheel drive (4WD)

Fuel Consumption:

5.2 – 10.5L/100km

Length:

4915-4945mm

Width:

1850mm

Height:

1880 – 1950mm

Kerb Weight:

1920 – 2220kg

Body Style:

5-door people mover (minivan/MPV)

Engines:

2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
3.5 litre V6 petrol
2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Power:

134kW – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
206kW – 3.5 litre V6 petrol
221kW – 3.5 litre V6 petrol (from 2018)
112/105kW (engine/electric motor) – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Torque:

235Nm – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
344Nm – 3.5 litre V6 petrol
361Nm – 3.5 litre V6 petrol (from 2018)
206/270Nm (engine/electric motor) – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Transmission & Drivetrains:

7-speed continuously variable transmission (CVT), front-wheel drive (FWD)
7-speed continuously variable transmission (CVT), four-wheel drive (4WD)
6-speed automatic, front-wheel drive (FWD)
6-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)
e-CVT, four-wheel drive (4WD)

Fuel Consumption:

5.2 – 10.5L/100km

Length:

4915-4945mm

Width:

1850mm

Height:

1880 – 1950mm

Kerb Weight:

1920 – 2220kg

Body Style:

5-door people mover (minivan/MPV)

Engines:

2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
3.5 litre V6 petrol
2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Power:

134kW – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
206kW – 3.5 litre V6 petrol
221kW – 3.5 litre V6 petrol (from 2018)
112/105kW (engine/electric motor) – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Torque:

235Nm – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder petrol
344Nm – 3.5 litre V6 petrol
361Nm – 3.5 litre V6 petrol (from 2018)
206/270Nm (engine/electric motor) – 2.5 litre 4-cylinder hybrid petrol

Transmission & Drivetrains:

7-speed continuously variable transmission (CVT), front-wheel drive (FWD)
7-speed continuously variable transmission (CVT), four-wheel drive (4WD)
6-speed automatic, front-wheel drive (FWD)
6-speed automatic, four-wheel drive (4WD)
e-CVT, four-wheel drive (4WD)

Fuel Consumption:

5.2 – 10.5L/100km

Length:

4915-4945mm

Width:

1850mm

Height:

1880 – 1950mm

Kerb Weight:

1920 – 2220kg

Warranty:

No manufacturer’s warranty (grey import)

Servicing:

12 months/10,000km

Model range, pricing & features

Toyota Vellfire-12

Alphard X / Vellfire X

Price when new: $35,000 - $42,000

Price used: $55,000 - $87,000

Standard features:

16-inch alloy wheels
Body coloured bumper bars
Body coloured side mirrors
Chrome door handles
Rear spoiler
Rear privacy glass
Passenger sliding door with one-touch function
Heat insulated glass
Stop/start system
Electric steering system
Driver and front passenger airbags
Front side airbags
Full-length curtain airbags
Driver’s knee airbag
Seat pretensioners and load limiters for for all passengers
ISOFIX points for all rear seats
Child seat anchor points
Seatbelt reminder for all seats
Active head restraints for driver and front passenger
Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
Electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD)
Brake assist
Electronic stability program (ESP)
Traction control
Hill hold control
Pre-collision system (PCS)
Drive start control
Active Torque Control (4WD models only)
Speed limiter
Rear parking sensors
Electrochromatic rear vision mirror
Electric side mirrors
Electric windows – front and rear with auto up/down function for all windows
Projector headlights
Front fog lights
LED side indicators integrated into side mirrors
Automatic headlights
Coming/leaving home function
High-mounted stop light
Daytime running lights (DRL)
Intermittent wipers with speed settings
Rear wiper
Remote central locking with keyless entry (via button on door handle)
Push button start
Tachometer
Fuel gauge
Trip computer
Colour driver’s display
Electromechnical handbrake
Handbrake auto hold function
Power steering
Steering wheel – tilt (up/down) and telescopic (reach) adjust
Multi-functional leather sterring wheel
Leather gear knob and handbrake
Dual-zone climate control
Rear air vents
Air vents in the third row
Cloth upholstery
Manually adjustable driver’s and front passenger’s seat
Second row – captain chairs (7-seat model)
8-speaker sound system
AM/FM radio
CD player
12V outlet
Front cup holders
Second row cup holders
Third row cup holders
Front bottle holders
Second bottle holders
Third row bottle holders
Centre console storage
Glovebox
Vanity mirror for driver and front passenger
Assist grips
Door scuff plates

2018 updates:

Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system
LED headlights with auto-levelling function

Alphard S / Vellfire Z

Price when new: $38,900 - $46,700

Price used: $56,000 - $90,000

In addition to Alphard X/Vellfire X:

18-inch alloy wheels
Aero body styling
Super UV protection

2018 updates:

Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system

Alphard G / Vellfire V

Price when new: $44,800 - $56,000

Price used: $57,000 - $92,000

In addition to Alphard X/Vellfire X:

17-inch alloy wheels
Fabric/leatherette upholstery
Large high grade console box

2018 updates:

Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system

Alphard S "A Package" / Vellfire Z "A Package"

Price when new: $45,000 - $58,000

Price used: $63,000 - $129,000

In addition to Alphard S/Vellfire Z:

18-inch alloy wheels
Cruise control
Passenger sliding door (both sides) with one-touch function

2018 updates:

Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system

Alphard S "C Package" / Vellfire Z "G Edition"

Price when new: $48,000 - $66,000

Price used: $65,000 - $130,000

In addition to Alphard S/Vellfire Z:

18-inch alloy wheels
UV with IR function
LED cornering headlights
Auto high-beam
LED fog lights
Steering wheel heating
Rain sensing wipers
Rear seat sunshade
Leatherette upholstery
Driver’s seat – 8-way electrically adjustable
Electrically sliding passenger seat
Electrically adjustable second row seats
Passenger seat ottoman
Door courtesy lamps
Armrest with storage holder

2018 updates:

Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system

Alphard SR / Vellfire ZR

Price when new: $51,000 - $69,500

Price used: $62,000 - $129,000

In addition to Alphard S/Vellfire Z:

17-inch alloy wheels
Aero body package
Drive start control
Mode switch
Rain sensing wipers
Rear seat sunshade

2018 updates:

Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system

Alphard SR C / Vellfire ZR G

Price when new: $56,000 - $71,000

Price used: $59,000 - $132,000

In addition to Alphard SR/Vellfire ZR:

17-inch alloy wheels
Driver’s heated seat
Electric tailgate
Fabric/leatherette upholstery
Electric ottoman – passenger’s seat
Auto high-beam
Heated steering wheel

2018 updates:
Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system

Alphard GF / Vellfire VL

Price when new: $59,000 - $70,000

Price used: $88,000 - $119,000

In addition to Alphard S/Vellfire Z:

17-inch alloy wheels
Auto high-beam
Electrically adjustable second and third row seats
Second row – Executive power seats with large armrest amd adjustable headrest
Electric tailgate
Heated steering wheel

2018 updates:

Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system

Executive Lounge

Price when new: $73,000 - $93,000

Price used: $73,000 - $93,000

In addition to Alphard GF/Vellfire VL:

17-inch alloy wheels
Auto high-beam
Pre-crash safety system
Radar cruise control
NAVI AI-SHIFT
100V/100-watt power outlet
Heated and ventilated seats
Second row – Executive Lounge Seats with reclining function, ottoman, table
Memory function – captains chairs
JBL premium 17-speaker sound system
9.2-inch infotainment system
Blu-ray/DVD player
USB/AUX input
SD slot
Digital TV
Satellite navigation

2018 updates:

Toyota Safety Sense
Autonomous emergency braking (AEB)
Lane departure warning
Blind spot detection
Automatic high beam
Pre-collision system
Rear cross traffic alert
Digital rear vision mirror
Premium Nappa leather upholstery
Rear seat entertainment system with 12.1-inch screen

Before we answer the should you buy question, if you’re seriously considering buying a people mover over a 7-seat SUV, congratulations, it’s great to see logic wins over image for you.

But, should you buy the Vellfire or Alphard pair? Very possibly.

The Vellfire and Alphard both make so much sense, with the only real potential negatives being dodgy grey importers, the immense fuel consumption of the V6 models and the polarising looks.

Just make sure you do your homework and make sure it has come from a reputable importer, get the Hybrid for fuel saving and budget for some sexy aftermarket wheels to distract everyone from the unfortunate-looking face, and it’s an absolute yes from us, you should buy one.

Before we answer the should you buy question, if you’re seriously considering buying a people mover over a 7-seat SUV, congratulations, it’s great to see logic wins over image for you.

But, should you buy the Vellfire or Alphard pair? Very possibly.

The Vellfire and Alphard both make so much sense, with the only real potential negatives being dodgy grey importers, the immense fuel consumption of the V6 models and the polarising looks.

Just make sure you do your homework and make sure it has come from a reputable importer, get the Hybrid for fuel saving and budget for some sexy aftermarket wheels to distract everyone from the unfortunate-looking face, and it’s an absolute yes from us, you should buy one.

Before we answer the should you buy question, if you’re seriously considering buying a people mover over a 7-seat SUV, congratulations, it’s great to see logic wins over image for you.

But, should you buy the Vellfire or Alphard pair? Very possibly.

The Vellfire and Alphard both make so much sense, with the only real potential negatives being dodgy grey importers, the immense fuel consumption of the V6 models and the polarising looks.

Just make sure you do your homework and make sure it has come from a reputable importer, get the Hybrid for fuel saving and budget for some sexy aftermarket wheels to distract everyone from the unfortunate-looking face, and it’s an absolute yes from us, you should buy one.

Disclaimer

Please note that pricing information is subject to fluctuations in the automotive market.

Information correct as of June 2, 2022.

The advice provided on this website is general advice only. It has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this advice, you should consider the appropriateness of the advice, having regard to your own objectives, financial situation and needs.

Read our full terms and conditions here.

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